Acid Reflux
Natural Remedies

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Top 10 Natural Remedies for Acid Reflux

Dietary Changes



Posted by Denise (Us) on 11/17/2018 56 posts
5 out of 5 stars

I have my acid reflux under control, mostly to Dietary Changes so I wanted to reply here. One huge change for me, was to eat no later than 6pm, but mainly, just don't go to bed within 4 hours or so of eating. I can eat toast as a snack, or anything that is very, easy to digest. I've had a few nights where I had eaten something I shouldn't have, pretty late, like only 2 or less hour before bed. If I do get it, I elevate my upper body, take a bit of baking soda in water usually. I did have a bottle of Gaviscon beside my bed, but no longer needed. I do eat mostly fish, poultry, and vegetables, but I'm more about moderation than anything. I do incorporate some things into my diet such as Apple cider vinegar (Mother's type) Coconut Oil, Blackstrap Molasses in my grated Ginger Tea, and nutritional yeast I just started recently. I also supplement with C, B50, extra B12, D3, Zinc and Magnesium. I love this site as I wouldn't have known all the things to try.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Olddude (Tn) on 10/16/2018 21 posts
5 out of 5 stars

I used ACV and baking soda for years, then I got into a Plant Based eating program and all my acid reflux went away,,, watch the documentary Forks over Knives on netflix when u can.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Jenny (Irvine, Ca) on 07/27/2013
5 out of 5 stars

I was vegetarian when I first started suffering from acid reflux. Apple cider vinegar, ginger chews and almonds would offer temporary relief from heartburns. The medication prescribed by doctors, a proton pump inhibitor, did not seem to make a difference. I started avoiding the foods that would trigger heartburns, which did help. But identifying these foods was far from obvious. Mine did not fit the usual list. Spicy, and fatty foods did not bother me. Some acidic foods did and others not.

But even when I did not have heartburns, I could not lay down to sleep because I would feel the burn come up to my throat, nose, ears and gums. My doctor diagnosed me with a loose lower esophagal sphincter (LES). This meant that the sphincter at the entrance to the stomach could no longer completely close up, which explains the backflow of stomach acid when laying down. Like many, I refused to take medication which lowered the level of acid in the stomach instead of addressing the real problem: the loose LES.

In the end, what really worked for me was probiotics and a dietary change. I tried the candida diet and later the Paleo diet, which have many similarities. The purpose of the candida diet is to eliminate the bad bacteria from one's body, especially from the stomach, by cutting out the foods that feed them and by promoting the growth the good bacteria. The philosphical premise of the Paleo diet is that, to be healthy, a person should eat a diet resembling what man ate before the advent of agriculture. This means primarily meat/fish/poultry and vegetables, with a few fruits and nuts. Of the fruits, one should only eat berries and avoid fruits that have been bred throughout time to be high in sugar. In addition to sugar, the main other thing to avoid is grains, since these are a product of agriculture, and were therefore not meant to be eaten (according to proponents of the diet). But the candida diet, sugar and carbs (most of which come from grains) are exactly the foods that feed the bad bacteria in the gut. The other similarity between the 2 diets I noticed is that both tended to eliminate chronic conditions of various sorts. Many followers of the Paleo diet have declared having fewer health issues and just feeling better overall.

After a month of taking probiotics and avoiding sugar and grains/carbs, I noticed I could lay down to sleep again. My tolerance for what used to be my trigger foods seemed to have increased as well. I am hoping to slowly phase out the probiotics, and just continue to eat well.

Side thought on the vegetarian versus meat-based diet: I was vegetarian primarily because I did not enjoy eating meat. However, I had IBS for as long as I could remember and the vegetarian diet did not do anything to alleviate the problem. I found it hard to incorporate what I thought was a healthy amount of veggies and ate large amounts of pasta and rice instead. But on a meat-based diet, I found that veggies, especially leafy greens, were much easier to include in meals. And I was using more spices too. I no longer suffer from IBS. And while I still do not always enjoy the taste of meat, I believe it to be the best source of protein. TVP-based fake meat products seem too processed. Soybeans has its own controversies (of which you can find discussions on the web). And the fact that beans make people fart is a sure sign that they are not easy to digest. Of course there are a lot of meat products that one should avoid. I always try to get the highest quality stuff I can find.

Finally, I would like to offer a list of resources that helped me find my way to better health:

* your doctor: only he can give you a proper diagnosis and let you know the true culprit in the matter.

* the web: this website and others like it were not only a source of information, for remedies to try, but also support

* books: there are numerous books that offer alternatives to medication. The one by Ms. Whittekin was particularly helpful and extensive in its coverage of solutions. I learned that marshmallow root and slippery elm will help heal the throat by coating it, and this was the book that initially introduced me to the candida diet. "Good calories, bad calories" is an important book that will reshape the way you think about food, especially regarding the latest opinions on what food is considered healthy and what is not.

* yourself: maintain a food and symptom diary, research your options and experiment. Good luck!


Dietary Changes
Posted by Eva (Ballymena, Northern Ireland) on 08/18/2012
5 out of 5 stars

My acid reflux started about 1 year ago. I wasn't sure at the beginning why I was so sick, had a nausea, was dizzy sometimes, tired.. Then I found out it is acid reflux. I was trying to heal it with Aloe, Apple cider vinegar and baking soda.. It did help for awhile but definately didn't heal it. Then I said to myself STOP. If I wont heal it, I can develope a cancer of aesophagus. I stopped to drink coffee, stopped to eat chocolate, began a vegan, started to make vegetable and fruit juices everyday and I feel 100% better! When I eat chocolate, I start to feel sick again. So I am better off from all these things.

I definately recomment lifestyle changes, because your body is trying to say: 'Stop to put all this rubbish to me! I need much more nutrition to keep you healthy and happy! ' I am quite glad now, that I started to have a GERD, because that made me think about my lifestyle and now I started to live healthy again with right choices of food as I used to do years ago. I make vegetable and fruit juices for my wee son as well, buy lots of vegetables and fruits everyday, try to make some new healthy vegan food nearly everyday. And I am very happy when my son eat it and like it, because I know, that I am giving him the best nutrition. So people. Don't be afraid to change your diet. It is the best think you can do for yourself in long term. I didnt want to take medicines for this, because I knew, it will only make my problem worst and then I will really get sick. I don't even need any medication anymore. Food is my medication. And avoiding coffee, chocolate and meat was the most important thing for me.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Robert (Martinez, California) on 06/21/2011
5 out of 5 stars

Barring there are no underlying conditions & there is 'typical' acid reflux then diet is essential. Poor food combining added to diminished enzymes & hydrochloric acid production causes food to rot. Enzymes & digestive acid production decline with age due to the constant eating of lifeless cooked foods. I am not recommending a raw food diet as all foods cannot be eaten raw. 1/4 to 1 tsp of air dried pink salt in a glass of water in the a.m. stimulates hydrochloric acid production. Enzymes may be taken before each major meal, not after, & followed by betaine hydrochloride after the meal. Dr. David Brownstein, M. D. wrote a small book on salt which is helpful for many ailments. Dr. Bob Marshall, PHd, CNC has a site that addresses these issues.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Kymom (Bowling Green, Kentucky, Usa) on 11/21/2010
5 out of 5 stars

Lisa,
I am 50 years old and have had difficulty with acid reflux for over a year. I, too, have noticed that beer is a big aggravator for me. There have been numerous things that help temporarily, but I have finally figured out that the acid/alkaline foods and beverages I drink seem to determine my level of reflux.

I am using 1/2 tsp baking soda with lime in the morning and at bedtime. I use more during the day if I am having heartburn or know I am going to eat acidic food. I also try to eat more alkaline foods than acidic. You can google and find a list of foods and where they fall on the list. Beer is very acidic, as is sugar, which may be why so many people find relief by eating low carb. Baking soda is very alkaline. I am also eating a grapefruit for breakfast and an apple for snack on a daily basis. Hope this helps. It is a miserable feeling to have reflux, but even worse is not knowing how to help yourself. Using the acid/alkaline food chart has helped me manage myself very well.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Paul (Lansing, Mi) on 12/10/2009
5 out of 5 stars

About 10 years ago, I went to my doctor with complaints of heartburn. Refered to specialist. Scoped and diagnosed acid reflux. Presciption. I asked the doctor if I would be taking this the rest of my life, he said yes. I determined that I would not. After 3 months and 3 different precriptions that made me feel worse I quit taking them. Felt better right away, but still had heartburn sometimes. I now know in my case it is chocolate. Just a small amount can make me feel like i'm having a heart attack hours later. Experiment, don't let them put you on a lifetime of prescriptions that will make you sicker.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Martha (Sacramento, CA) on 04/30/2009
5 out of 5 stars

I went on the Atkins diet twice in my life and both times, my GERD disappeared. I have mentioned that to all the Drs I have ever seen and they all just shook their heads and blew it off as an anomaly. I am happy to hear of someone else having that same experience. I won't go back on Atkins, but now I am motivated to once again cut most of the bad carbs out and see if it helps.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Annette (Sacramento, Ca) on 12/02/2008
5 out of 5 stars

I am writing to tell you of a discovery I made when I stopped eating carbs for weight loss. As long as I kept off carbs, I had no, zero, nada acid reflux! So, I have come to the conclusion that for myself, carbs are the cause of my acid reflux. It is hard to avoid carbs without planning and it takes a week to clear the sugars from your muscles and liver...but soon you will not have cravings for carbs and I hope, no more acid reflux. Good luck!


Dietary Changes
Posted by Ross (Port Washington, NY) on 10/23/2008
5 out of 5 stars

I have taken Prilosec or Nexium for 45 years straight, and have recently detoxed as part of a program to help my thyroid and adrenal fatigue. Long story short, I simultaneously stopped taking my Prilosec, and I was fine. My detox consisted of raw veggies, fruit, fish and chicken. When I went off detox, reflux returned with a vengeance. My Naturopath suggested that I remove gluten from my diet, and I have been completely acid free for 2 weeks without any medicines. This is unheard of for me. I strongly believe that for some people reflux is a sign of gluten intolerance or worse. By removing Gluten, everything improves...skin, brain, energy, etc.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Arthur (Arbor Vitae, Wisconsin) on 07/15/2008
5 out of 5 stars

I am age 83. I suffered from canker sores continuously my whole life until 2 years ago when by accident I discovered that I had celiac disease, that is gluten intolerance. Since going on a gluten-free diet I have not had even one canker sore. NADA! Also the acid reflux that I had all my adult life has also almost completely gone away.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Gary (Carpinteria, CA) on 06/10/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Just a note on what has helped me with acid reflux. I was really suffering badly from this for several months, I tried a lot of different diets, and also ACV baking soda and bentonite clay. None of these helped me significantly. I came across an article from a natural health practitioner who stated that he was able to cure many of his clients from acid reflux by giving them a strict low carbohydrate diet to follow. I immediately went out and bought a couple of the low carb books and read them as fast as possible to learn how to do this type of diet. I started the next day, and I have not had any major problem since (3 years) -- I do occasionally still get some acid reflux if I eat too many starchy foods. If I follow a low carb diet reasonably strictly, I have minimal problems. Once you learn how, it is easy, and also keeping your insulin levels low helps with many other health conditions.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Lisa (London, England) on 05/14/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Acid Reflux: I was given a prescription for antacids from my doctor to deal with acid reflux. I was suffering from a persistnet cough, mainly in the morning and often throughout the day. I could tell it was not a flu-related cough. My naturopath friend advised me to stop drinking and eating at the same time. I tried it for a week and my cough stopped. I drink at least a half hour or more before or after a meal or even after something as small as a donut. I am very concious about separating the two processes. Try it, it works! It is all to do with the fact that the stomach can not digest food properly with liquid in it. As a result the acid builds up and causes reflux. Simple.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Robert (Martinez, California) on 03/19/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Meats stay in the digestive system for many days.To increase digestive acid take 1/4-1/2 tsp. "pink salt" with meals per day.Stay away from pasteurized dairy, & sugar.Eat more raw greens than cooked.Baking soda will work in emergency however the salt content is too much for frequent use. Try "Raw" unheated honey,2 tbsp.in 1 cup Perrier or other naturally carbonated water. Penta water is alkaline.Take "Megazymes" after meals for routine maint.Turmeric is very good for digestion,1/2-1 tsp.& promotes healthy flora.Great herbs are thistle leaves as a tea or calamus root, a small 1/4-1/2 dried root tucked between lip & gum works very well & is great for bad food from restaurants.Allow to disolve in mouth.


Dietary Changes
Posted by Joanne (Titusville, Florida) on 03/17/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Doctor said I probably had acid reflux and prescribed the "purple pill". It made me sick and I never used it again. My husband suggested that I check my Ph balance. Low and behold I was on the acidic side. I then researched the internet and found foods that are acidic and avoided them. I also found out that we lose our good bacteria in our stomach due to the antibiotics we have taken over the years. To solve this problem I take acidophillis each day. I also take a few "Chorella" pills daily.(the green pills) As long as I avoid the "acid" foods, my body does well. There has to be a balance of acid/alkaline foods eaten daily. I am 65 years young and have advised my children that they had better watch their diets. I find that the majority of folks can't seem to part with their "SODA" or "COLA"(caffeine) each day. Beware, this is one of the major culprits of acid reflux. When you go into a restaurant always order water with lemon. This will help your stomach before you indulge.



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