Insomnia
Natural Remedies

Natural Remedies for Insomnia, Tried and True

Eliminating Wheat

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Carrie (Livonia, Mi) on 12/31/2014
5 out of 5 stars

Since giving up wheat my insomnia has completely subsided. I'm not fully gluten free, just giving up wheat has made an incredible difference in my quality of sleep and life!


Flax Seeds

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Lily (Los Angeles) on 08/06/2015
5 out of 5 stars

Whenever I can't sleep, I take about 3 tablespoons of ground flaxseeds at night in rice or almond milk or cottage cheese and I instantly feel calm and can have the best night's sleep!


Gelatin

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Beryl M. (Nottingham UK) on 03/17/2019
5 out of 5 stars

I came across this remedy quite by accident. At the time I couldn't lose weight and wondered if it had anything to do with my thyroid (it didn't) but a particular website recommended taking a tablespoonful of gelatine in orange juice before going to bed. I tried this and discovered that it helped me sleep. I now get between seven to eight hours sleep a night, apart from one trip to the loo! The gelatine is readily available from your local superstore, and mine come in individual packets containing one tablespoonful. It does not dissolve easily, but keep stirring. I have mine mixed with a small amount of milk. Worth a try, and it certainly will not harm you.


Ginger Tea

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Famcoll (Tennessee) on 10/23/2017
5 out of 5 stars

I discovered quite accidentally that a strong cup of ginger tea brewed from fresh ginger slices taken one hour before bedtime makes me sleep. After years of using medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, to induce sleep I found that ginger tea, for me, has a soporific effect. Since I couldn't find anything on the web explaining this phenomenon, I looked up information on some Chinese language websites. Only one explained the use of ginger as a sleep agent. Apparently, it works only for people who are "pa leng" or "afraid of cold." This means, if you have the tendency to have cold fingers and toes you may benefit from ginger tea as a sleep agent. Anyway, it works for me.

Replied by Jean H.
(Us)
04/14/2018

Ginger also lowers cortisol levels.


Gluten-Free Diet

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by BBHE (NYC) on 10/26/2019
5 out of 5 stars

I had insomnia for about 10 years and it nearly killed me.

I finally realized that whenever I had any gluten at all, even a micro dose, it would pop my eyes awake in the middle of the night, reliably. I think it's really weird. I always thought, yeah yeah cut back on gluten dairy etc. and try to eat healthy. But that's not what's going on. I can eat unhealthfully but as long as I don't get ANY gluten, I sleep like a baby. I don't know why it took me so long to figure it out, Maybe it was that I was sleep deprived. Also it seems like whey in whey protein shakes sometimes hurts my sleep and I've given that up as well. But gluten does seem to be the big culprit.


Herb Tea

Posted by Nicholas (Edison, Nj Usa) on 09/01/2011

I've not been getting good sleep for a couple of weeks. I had no problem falling asleep, but slept only a couple hour, on and off. Very dissatisfying... left me weary.

I checked this fabulous website and saw it recommended different teas to help sleep. I found I had two ... Yoga brand "Bedtime" tea and Sunrider brand Calli "night" tea. I boiled both of them separately... 3 cups of water each pot. I slowly sipped a full cup of the Yoga tea after my evening meal, and then slowly sipped a full cup of the Sunrider during the hour before sleep.

I had a good night's sleep, had great dreams and awoke in a positive mood. Tonight I will drink only one of them to see if it's sufficient to the task.

Replied by Jc
(Boston, Ma)
09/22/2011

I have and still use the Yogi Bed Time tea from time to time. I helps a little bit for me but not a significant difference. If you drink too much after 8pm it may wake you to urinate. This effect needs to be balanced with many herbal bed time teas.

I find the Nighty Night tea by Traditional Medicinals to be a biy more effective. But again, nothing dramatic, sublte and no urge to urinate at 4 AM.

Can anyone recomend any Chinese Herbs for sleep?


Honey

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Bwhiskered (ON) on 10/17/2021
5 out of 5 stars

A spoonful of Honey before bedtime. If you waken though the night a spoonful will usually get yo back to sleep,


Honey and Cinnamon

3 User Reviews
5 star (2) 
  67%
1 star (1) 
  33%


Posted by Bonnie (Long Beach, US) on 12/13/2007
5 out of 5 stars

I was looking on your site a couple days ago and saw a remedy with honey to help lose weight. I tried it and found that i had more energy during the day, had less of an appetite, and fell asleep faster at night!! i love it! the remedy i found was every morning, a half hour before breakfast, as well as right before bed at night, drink a tablespoon of honey in one cup of boiling water with a teaspoon of cinnamon. It has only been four days, but man, what a difference!!!

Replied by T.Srikantharajah
(Wimbledon, England)
12/04/2007
5 out of 5 stars

Daily in the morning, 1/2 hour before breakfast on an empty stomach and at night before sleeping, drink honey and cinnamon powder boiled in one cup water. If taken regularly it reduces the weight of even the most obese person. Also drinking of this mixture regularly does not allow the fat to accumulate in the body even though the person may eat a high calorie diet.

Replied by Kimmi
(Park City, Ks)
06/14/2011
12 posts
1 out of 5 stars

i tried this last night for my insomnia.... And nothing... How disappointing... Sigh... But I may still try it for weight loss.. ;-)


Horlicks

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Beth (London, UK) on 06/01/2009
5 out of 5 stars

My mum is 65 years old and has been experiencing lack of sleep at night for about 3-4 years. She would drop off to sleep but never have any sound sleep as she would hear everything happening at night and had difficulty falling asleep after getting up at night. She now takes a drink of Horlicks every night and sleeps quite soundly that I have to wake her up in the morning. She gets up in the early hours of the morning to go to the toilet then drops back to sleep quite soundly that she can't hear my radio playing music in the morning. She started with 4 teaspoons of horlicks in a cup of milk as the label states but now sleeps even with taking one teaspoon. She also uses the light, medium and strong types and they all work the same. On the nights she doesn't take horlicks, she doesn't sleep. What I can't understand is that she used to take vitamin B complex tablets, which horlicks is mainly made of, every night but never slept. Does anybody know of any side effects for long term usage of horlicks?

EC: Horlicks is a malted milk hot drink: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horlicks

Replied by Lorayne
(Sun City, Az)
01/23/2012

I wouldn't use Horlicks, since it contains milk which means it probably contains rBGH (genetically modified bovine growth hormone). Go to www.mercola.com to read up on the dangers of GMOs. They are in dairy, soy, corn, canola, zucchini, yellow squash, Hawaiian papaya, cottonseed and alfalfa at present. Organic food cannot be GMO. So if you want to eat these things, choose organic. The Environmental Working Group has a petition of it's website to force labeling of products that contain these poisonous GMOs. Go to www.ewg.org to sign the petition.


Hot Milk

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Deirdre (Ct) on 08/26/2020
5 out of 5 stars

My mother, for her entire lifetime, would make herself a hot cup of milk if she got up in the middle of the night and couldn't get back to sleep. (1 cup of milk contains 300 mg of calcium. ) She also added a touch of honey. She said it never failed to knock her out after 15 minutes. She also used to give this to us as children about 30 minutes before bedtime. I haven't done it in a long time, but perhaps I shall again. Great night-time ritual memory.


Hot Water Bottle

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Rural Girl (Central Texas) on 07/02/2015
5 out of 5 stars

I used to take a long time to go to sleep or wake up shortly after falling asleep. I had read on Dr. Mercola's site that the lowering of body temperature acts to put us to sleep, so my hypothyroid, too-low temperature didn't allow more lowering. I guess I was wide awake to preserve life when my temp was 95.9 - 97.2F. (In cold survival situations people who fall asleep die.)

I have had some 1,2 and even 3 hot bath nights to get back to sleep. I used to monitor my temperature frequently at night. Now I just take a hot water bottle to bed. I go right to sleep and sleep all night long. Electric heating pads are not recommended. They put off harmful EMF, ElectroMagnetic Fields, plus I got a fatty tumor where I fell asleep on one set on low. Sweet dreams!


Hypnic Jerks

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Hayley (Washington State) on 07/29/2014

I've had severe hypnic jerks at least 6 nights a week for close to 8 or more years that disrupted my sleep to no end. Even when I could sleep, I couldn't because the jerks kept me from falling asleep. I've spend hours researching the underlying cause to no end. Magnesium oil helped to a limited to degree, but that's about it until I read a few comments about Benadryl causing hypnic jerks. After reading this, I researched it, and found it's true so I went off it--I had been taking it on a daily basis for allergies and migraine headaches for years. Since I went off the Benadryl, I've had 3 hypnic jerks in the nine nights I've been off it.

I'm convinced hypnic jerks are a side-effect of a lot of meds, and would urge anyone suffering from them to google everything they take with the word 'myoclonus' to see if it's a side-effect. If it is, and you're able to go off the med, your jerks should settle down as mine did.

Replied by Anthony
(Ireland)
09/30/2021
5 out of 5 stars

I too suffered from hypnic jerks, past tense. It was my medication that was causing them, taking magnesium out of the system. I would get them when trying to fall asleep and just before you dose off, they would jerk you awake again. one night I jumped out of bed with one scary. Too much tea coffee and alcohol would also take magnesuim out of the system. I would get them real bad on a Sunday night if I was out drinking Saturday night. Now I take magnesium citrate two hours before bed 400mg with a snack, magnesium by solgar best quality. Not that expensive for a month's supply. Cut back on tea coffee and alcohol.


Ignatia Amara (Homeopathic Remedy)

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Sean (Ca, Usa) on 10/18/2013
5 out of 5 stars

Hello, I've been taking Ignatia Amara when I wake up in the middle of the night and can't go back to sleep (racing thoughts and anxiety).... It seems to work but is it Ok to take it every night long term??? Thank you for your feedback!


Insomnia

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Mama To Many (Tennessee) on 08/12/2021
5 out of 5 stars

Last week I started taking some Motherwort twice a day. (2 droppers of the tincture twice daily - once in the morning and once before bed)

After a few days, I noticed that my sleep was better. I have a fitbit and each morning take note of how my sleep was the night before. It has been interesting to see what helps my sleep. Definitely, 15 mg of melatonin at night has improved the ratio of deep sleep and REM sleep to light sleep. After a few days of the Motherwort, I realized that my deep sleep is improved further. I wasn't taking it for sleep and it took me a little bit to even realize what in my routine had changed.

Motherwort is a relaxing herb. It is sometimes used for racing heart or for anxiety - I guess often the two go together. And apparently, it can help improve sleep!

I make my own motherwort tincture. I have used Herb Pharm's Motherwort tincture in the past and find it to be a quality brand if you are looking for Motherwort!

~Mama to Many~


Insomnia Treatment Centers

Posted by Shannon (Bangkok, Thailand) on 07/06/2014

Hi, I really need a place to go to help with my insomnia. I have had this for over 18yrs or so and basicly just can't sleep. I hab=ve found some good information on the site but I feel like I need some direction. I am in Bangkok, is there a brick and mortar place I can come to? Thanks so much

Replied by Gertieg
(Al)
07/07/2014

Me, too! I've tried everything and nothing works. Most supplements give me diarrhea. I just read online about a 'sleep switch' that Oxford Univ. has/is studying--says there is an exercise one can do to 'turn off' the wakefulness. I wish!

Replied by Timh
(KY)
07/08/2014
2075 posts

I recently read an article stating that liver disease is often associated w/ insomnia, and I can make a personal testament of that correlation in my life. Other diseases like hormonal disturbances, chronic infections, etc are also common causes of insomnia.

I think it fair to assume that a majority of insomnia cases are simply a side effect of some other primary disease.

Replied by Kathy
(L A, US)
07/07/2014

Two things you might want to try for insomnia. Lavender essential oil, it's very relaxing and calming. Next, try a process called EFT. Sleep well!

Replied by KT
(Usa)
07/08/2014

Based on observing my husband, I think eating too much too late contributes to insomnia.

Replied by Gertie
(Va)
07/08/2014

I have tried lavender essential oil and EFT. Neither worked for my insomnia.

Replied by Karin
(New York City, New York)
07/08/2014

Sorry to hear people are suffering with this. Have you tried deep breathing and meditating at night before you go to sleep? The idea is to get into your right brain which will deeply relax you. It's very difficult to do when your mind is racing, but the more you practice, the easier it gets. You need to give it 20 - 30 minutes. Eventually the brain recircuits itself and sleep gets easier. I also know a few women who feel hormone balancing herbal formulas helped a racing mind!

Replied by KT
(Usa)
07/08/2014

Dear Karin I think you hit the nail on the head describing a racing mind---now I can justify mentioning the MSG factor. MSG is a nerve stimulant. All foods contains some source of MSG. Many sources are hidden under names you would never suspect.

Replied by Mmsg
(Somewhere, Europe)
07/09/2014

Gertie, read up on magnesium for insomnia.



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