Coconut Oil
Natural Remedies

Coconut Oil Cures

Refined Vs. Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

Posted by Cary (Phoenix, Arizona) on 11/07/2007
5 out of 5 stars

Most commercial grade coconut oils are made from copra. Copra is basically the dried kernel (meat) of the coconut. It can be made by: smoke drying, sun drying, or kiln drying , or derivatives or a combination of these three. If standard copra is used as a starting material, the unrefined coconut oil extracted from copra is not suitable for consumption and must be purified, that is refined. This is because the way most copra is dried is not sanitary. The standard end product made from copra is RBD coconut oil. RBD stands for refined, bleached, and deodorized. High heat is used to deodorize the oil, and the oil is typically filtered through (bleaching) clays to remove impurities. Sodium hydroxide is generally used to remove free fatty acids and prolong shelf life. This is the most common way to mass-produce coconut oil. The older way of producing refined coconut oil was through physical/mechanical refining (see Tropical Traditions Expeller Pressed Coconut Oil.). More modern methods also use chemical solvents to extract all the oil from the copra for higher yields.

RBD oil is also sometimes hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated. This happens mostly in tropical climates, since the natural melting point of coconut oil is about 76 degrees F, and already naturally a solid in most colder climates. Since coconut oil is mostly saturated, there is little unsaturated oil left to hydrogenate. Hydrogenated oils contain trans fatty acids.

Virgin Coconut Oil

Virgin Coconut Oil can only be achieved by using fresh coconut meat or what is called non-copra. Chemicals and high heating are not used in further refining, since the natural, pure coconut oil is very stable with a shelf life of several years. There are currently two main processes of manufacturing Virgin Coconut Oil:

1. Quick drying of fresh coconut meat which is then used to press out the oil. Using this method, the coconut meat is quick dried, and the oil is then pressed out via mechanical means. (see our Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil)

2. Wet-milling. With this method the oil is extracted from fresh coconut meat without drying first. "Coconut milk" is expressed first by pressing. The oil is then further separated from the water. Methods which can be used to separate the oil from the water include boiling, fermentation, refrigeration, enzymes and mechanical centrifuge. (see our Traditional Virgin Coconut Oil)

If you would like so see how they process the extra virgin oil, then go to youtube and you'll find it under.
The Cocovida virgin coconut oil production process...Take 11


Ringworm

Posted by Suzeeq (Port Saint Lucie, Florida) on 03/16/2013

Noticed a rash that looked like ringworm, found this site and decided to go with the coconut oil, can anyone tell me how long it takes to go away if I'm applying twice daily?


Saturated Fat in Coconut Oil

Posted by Tish (North York, Ontario, Canada) on 07/25/2010

Hello everyone at EC. This website has taught me so much regarding my health. For the past week I've after reading so much good abt EVCO started taking it, however I came across this article which has me worried: http://www.healthcastle.com/coconut-saturated-heart.shtml

I need some help here. Any insight will be appreciated. Take care all.

Replied by Francisca
Michelbach-le-bas, Alsace, France
07/28/2010

Hi, maybe you should consider reading some books on the subject. . . . . That is what I did after getting some great information from Bill from the Philippines. I have recently posted a review on a book called Cholesterol and Fats are good for you but there are others specifically on coconut oil and coconut products. There is a lot of misinformation out there. . . . . I have started cooking with coconut oil, doing oil pulling with it too and using it as sun cream. So far, so good. . . . . . . We were in England last week and I got a magazine offered by the chemists (mainstream ones) where they had an article about how good coconut oil is for the health. I am going to read a few more books soon.

Replied by Tish
North York, Ontario, Canada
07/28/2010

Hey Francisca, thank you for the reply. You are right one should read all articles available to be sure. I have been on VCO for the past two weeks :) and have also started cooking with VCO, so far I feel great. Earth clinic was a blessing for me and I would like to thank everyone for taking the time and posting their progress on this website.

Replied by Francisca
Michelbach-le-bas, Alsace, France
07/30/2010

Hi Tish, I have started reading a book today which I think is very interesting and which gives a lot of information: Trick and Treat. It is not only about fats but about health in general and how we are all getting more and more ill. Maybe I will post here a review at the end although I haven't understood yet whether people are interested in reading books.


Posted by Robert (Moreno Valley, Ca) on 02/08/2010

Ive just started trying the Organic Virgin Coconut Oil and have read quite a bit here on your website and have read almost every single letter/email or comment. But Ive also read on another site that the oil is pretty high in saturated fat which is normally very bad for you and can cause heart disease and high cholesterol so how is it that so many people have claimed that it does the exact opposite? Is there a difference between the fat is from a fruit versus from an animal? Thanks and Im looking forward on seeing in the next few days how it will affect me.

Replied by Graham
Englewood, Florida, Usa
06/29/2010

The saturated fats in coconut oil are medium chain rather than the long chain version in meats. Saturated medium chain fats are very healthy.

Replied by Tom
Regina, Sk
06/29/2010

Graham: Not true!
http://www.scientificpsychic.com/fitness/fattyacids1.html

You are confusing terms, and also propagating another myth as bad as the cholesterol myth, and one that goes back even farther.

A glycerol or glycerine 'backbone' can attach one (mono), two (di), or three (tri) fatty acids, and each of those can be any degree (short, medium or long; un-, mono-, poly-)of unsaturation. Saturated fats are NOT bad for you in any amount or way or shape or form, and there are zero properly conducted scientific studies ever done that show them to be bad! If they were bad, then there would have been no 'primitives' living on the tropical islands for Dr. Weston Price to study in the 1920's for their superior health! They used coconuts almost exclusively for their dietary fat.

Coconut has MCTs, medium chain triglycerides, which are shorter than 'long chain', and MCTs are burned preferentially by the cells for energy. The reason is that the body uses the saturated fats as an essential building block in such things as cell membranes. But note that in the table in the link, coconut oil is very predominately composed of saturated fatty acids (over 90 %)!

Yet the tropical residents whom Dr. Price studied were among the very healthiest he'd ever seen,and especially compared to the First World people in the USA, Britain, etc. Of course since then the average First Worlder diet has gone way downhill, and there are almost no peoples extant still living the simple unprocessed food life that Price found quite common in the 1920's.


Seizures

Posted by Holli (Kansas City, MO) on 06/17/2009
4 out of 5 stars

When I found out the long list of benefits for coconut oil, i bought some. Primarily for my 5 yr olds seizures, but figured we'd use here n there. My acne is clearing up- by moisturizing with it. My hair looks better-hot coconut oil treatment. And best yet, my 5 yr old has had noticibly fewer/calmer seizures this week! I'm just a geek on the net, not trying to sell anything, but wow. read up on it's versatility.

Replied by Faithinhealing
Forest Park, Ohio, Usa
03/01/2010

Three years ago I started using raw coconut oil for my seizures after reading about the ketogenic diet which has helped people control their seizures. I kept my seizures away for three years until one day I stopped to detox with smoothies. That day I had a seizure and have since then gone back on a high fat diet to control them! I use coconut oil, olive oil, and real butter.


Shelf Life

Posted by Evelyn (Denver, Co) on 05/12/2011

Hi. I just read a whole lot about 'oil pulling' here on your site, what a strange idea... But with lots of valid uses! So, while considering giving this a try, I remembered that I still have a whole gallon of virgin coconut oil that my Dad bought, after much research on it's benefits, he never used it at all. You know, he was "old school". I believe he likely opened it, saw it as a gallon of really pricey fat, not quite remembering all the good claims it had made to it's use... Felt rather ashamed he'd probably been ripped off... Through no one's fault but his own, and closed it back up thinking... "~no way! ~"
The thing is... This was a few years ago. He has since passed, & adding that my daughter is highly allergic to coconut, I just felt it was better left alone, for the time being. (to rot?) OK, my daughter has now moved out. This gallon of fine virgin fat has been with me this whole time. I have been storing this gallon of (quite expensive) coconut oil, .. And yes, still I have it, sitting on the floor of my pantry.
OK, so I just now finally opened it up... yes, in the middle of writing this... But thought if it were rancid, I could save the trouble of asking/posting, here... But to my surprise, it was just as fine as could be. The surface hadn't even been touched! (I'm SO thankful that little furry green coconut babies didn't come oozing out..!! & I'll bet I've just stirred my dear old Dad's soul when I too, noticed that it looks just like a tub o' lard! ) Sorry, I don't mean to delay my point, or question, rather. I'm just in one of those writing modes, I guess...

So my question is: No harm in trying it out... Is there? Even being "aged", as it is? It doesn't smell like anything at all, but when I dipped some out into a smaller container & rubbed it into my hands and arms it got a light coconutty sweet smell to it, but not strong at all... Quite pleasing, really. Not at all rancid, sour or otherwise spoiled. I almost feel silly even asking, now that I've tested it out topically... & I suppose, if nothing else, I could make some kind of skin preparation from it! But since I've gone and typed all this out .... Maybe it will save someone else from having to ask. Or... Otherwise let the world know that it is probably ok to use even "aged" for... Ok, 2007, is when he floated on outta here, so... I'd give a likely guess at probably 6 or 7 years old, now. That's quite a long shelf life! Only due to its appearance, am I almost already comfortable with its future use, but, really, I know nothing about any kind of longivity for its health benefits to remain... I still value the opinion of an expert or knowledge of experience... Whichever...

So, please, do let me know if you see any adverse reasons for using this product!!! While I can't yet see myself spreading it on my toast, I don't forsee any harm if I were to swish it and spit it! I must say, it feels good to have that feeling of, "I just KNEW I'd find a use for ~that~.. someday! " I Thank you so much in advance for your consideration, and subsequent opinion/advice.

Replied by Anon.
Uk, Europe
05/13/2011

It would be a real shame to use the coconut oil for pulling (use sesame or sunflower oil instead) - you should use the coconut oil neat on your skin like moisturizer or better still as you would vegetable oil. It melts at 75 degrees F and, unlike many other oils, it can withstand the high temperatures undamaged. If you like the taste, you can eat it any way you like.


Sinus Infection

Posted by Theresa (Ireland) on 02/22/2015

I'm am writing to let you know I am using coconut oil for the last week, external use on my chest area and face and it has worked wonders on my sinus and chest infections. I suffer a lot with chest infections and I have noticed this is getting rid of the infection from chest and head area. I just started to use it for skin condition and noticed it was getting rid of infection. So now I am going to start taking it internally to reap the benefits.


Sinus, Allergy and Asthma Issues

Posted by Mary-Ellen (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) on 08/08/2006
5 out of 5 stars

I'was totally fed up with the above symptoms. I spent 4 months of last year fighting my health problems... did some research into evco.. and thought why not.... well let me say i cannot believe the difference this oil has made to my overall health... look truly i recommend anyone to give it a go..... you have nothing to lose and so much to gain....!


Skin Issues

Posted by Joy (Battlegound, Wash) on 03/10/2013

Hi, I read the book by Mary Newport on Alzheimers and she talked about coconut oil and I then started reading web sites to find out more.

I was hit by a car in the abdomen at 3 and flew 15 feet and hit a firehydrant with my head, so I have trauma to the brain, ADHD , Dyslexia and memory problems and learning challenges... so I followed some things I read and started on a tsp a day in my oatmeal and put a little on my skin and it soaked right in. My skin is EXTREMELY SENSITIVE , but NO Problems with the coconut oil. I am up to 3- 7 tsp. a day and coat my face neck hands and feet daily. dry heels are GONE.

I got a little acne at first and I've always had some but I haven't had any in a while , just kept putting the oil on the outbreaks. Hope it helps.


Posted by Vic (Niagara Falls, Ontario. Canada) on 01/22/2013
5 out of 5 stars

I have been using organic virgin coconut oil for quite a while now and must say... wowwww... I aIso use it for cooking, and applying it on my lips and face and have noticed the great changes.. I eat from the jar around 3-4 teaspoons a day and love it not to mention the great favor it adds to tea. I can only say anyone that is having problems with it especially in their bowel movements must be using a cheap imitation brand. I have tried both the jar brand and also by the bulk at bulk barn in canada. It's also a little cheaper at around $8.75 per kilo or 2.5 pounds.. I will be using it for ever now and everyone I talk to loves it in cooking with their foods and also in their salads by melting it down in a pan.

Replied by Melanie
Wanganui, New Zealand
07/23/2013

The best way to heat coconut oil is to put some in a eggcup and put that in a cup of hot water.

Replied by Shigure
Poland
10/26/2018

How do you drink it with tea?


Posted by Jayjay (Atlanta, Ga, Usa) on 06/01/2010
0 out of 5 stars

I am new at this so hopeful this makes sense. I really need some information on using VCO. I have a skin condition that is like psoriasis, but worse. Having tried so many prescription medication that did not work (now I don't take any prescription medication for the condition), I wanted to try a natural remedy. I have been using VCO for about a week all over my body. At first my skin seems to get smoother. Now it is tightening and then swelling. If you can imagine having a bump with a head on it that is being squeezed, well that is how my face and neck feels. The VCO seems to be drying my skin. I have been applying the VCO literarily day and night.

1. Can you use too much VCO on the skin?
2. Have anyone's condition gotten worse before seeing results with VCO?
3. Should I take the VCO internally?
4. What are the side effects, if any, of using VCO externally?
5. How long should I be using the VCO before I see postive results?

Replied by Rainman
Central, Vt, Usa
06/02/2010

First of all... make sure you are not allergic to coconut oil. If anything... it makes my skin to oily/greasy if I apply it frequently... same with my wife.

I have Keratosis Pilaris Rubra and have been using VCO for the past few weeks. However, I have not applied it nearly as much as you. What I have found that works really well with my skin condition is to not use soap on the affected areas. No soap at all! I know there are really good organic/natural soaps out there. But, I have simply replaced soap with apple cider vinegar for these bad skin areas.

This is what I do: Before I get in the shower, I spray a 50/50 solution of ACV and filtered water all over my skin and pat it dry with a CLEAN towel (if needed). Once my skin is completely dry, I apply a thick layer of VCO and really rub it in. Of course, this is really oily looking, so I jump in the shower and continue to work it in with the warm water. After I get out of the shower I use another clean towel to pat myself dry. It doesn't take much toweling because the oil makes the water beed right off. I have only done this a few times so far about every 3 days. So far... my skin is really starting to look better than it has in years (since as long as I can remember). The bumps are smoothing out and the redness is fading. Suprisingly, I do not have the body odor I used to have when I was constantly using soap.

I have read that a lot if not most of these skin conditions are somehow related to stuff you eat.... In many cases, it comes down to gluten and dairy as the main culprits. My wife has suffered with psoriasis for years and we are just now starting to realize all of the possible poisons we have been feeding ourselves. So, possibly take a look at your diet to see if you can improve it. For instance, starting next week... I am going to try an experiment. I am only going to eat RAW food (especially no gluten/dairy) for a few weeks and see how I feel. I have an idea that it's probably going to be a life changing experience. But, we'll see. :)

Replied by Jimjim
Central Alabama
10/06/2014

Try covering the affected area with aquaphor healing ointment every morning after shower and again before bed time.

Replied by Sonam
New York, Ny
04/12/2015
5 out of 5 stars

So for anyone who's a seasoned VCO user, you already know how powerful its antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal properties are.

I have eczema (I've had it since I was a baby), and I recently had a flare-up after consuming too much dairy and gluten for a period of 2+ months. I started using coconut oil on my eczema patches, and I had the same experience as you -- my skin got worse (a lot worse, actually, because it literally looked like it was peeling and getting even more inflamed than before). But the main thing to realize is that this is SUPPOSED to happen when you use a natural substance like VCO. It works by drawing out toxins through your elimination organs, and for a lot of people - especially those with prior skin abnormalities - the way those toxins come out is through the skin. Hence the temporary worsening of symptoms. My skin got way worse for a little over a week, as my skin condition was pretty severe, so the healing took longer than it would for most people. But once that week passed, it was clear as day. No redness, no dryness, no itching. I noticed it recently started to get worse again, but that's because I've been lenient with my diet over the past 2 weeks, so I plan to get back on my strict dairy-free, gluten-free, sugar-free meal plan.

Anyway, the main point is that yes, it's normal, and even encouraged, for your condition to get worse before it gets better, as this is a sign that deeper internal cleansing is occurring. Good luck!


Posted by Cat (Austin, Tx) on 05/10/2010
5 out of 5 stars

Grandmother Guffys Method for forever soft, clean, ageless skin.

My grandmother Guffys skin was as soft and smooth as a babys butt till the day she died at 94. One day, when I was a younger woman constantly on the go, she noticed how dry and ashy my skin was and elected to tell me about her method of bathing. It was the only thing she said she did to keep her body clean and soft. First, she never took long baths (and NO, she did not smell). She said bathing dried out skin. Second, she never used hot water on her skin. Third, she never needed lotions. I listened; yet, despite the evidence before me, I did not take her advise. Hot showers were invigorating, I exclaimed. Who ever heard of not bathing, I secretly thought. Why do not the young listen! For years now I have suffered with extremely dry and itchy skin. FINALLY! I recalled my grandmother Guffys bathing method for clean, itch-less, soft, ageless skin. Here it is:

1) Massage 2-3 tablespoons of (antibacterial, anti-fungal) coconut oil over your entire dry, naked body, but not your face. Be sure to include your private areas and feet - get utterly greasy with it! Let it soak 5 minutes.

2) Take a clean, white, DRY bath cloth, folded in fours and scrub your entire body. When one side of the cloth gets cruddy, refold to a clean side of the same cloth. Don't forget private areas.

3) Shower/rinse in very lukewarm to cold water and ONLY wash your private areas with diluted baking soda and water or an organic non-soap or as I sometimes do, diluted ACV.

3) Get out of the shower and barely pat dry.

Believe! This works! People who touch my skin always exclaim at how soft it is AND my husband who has scratched my back many a time has taken to gently rubbing my arms a lot. Just try it! It is not real expensive or hard to do and results are quick. If you are allergic to coconut oil, switch to a light olive oil or sesame oil. Soon you will do as I did - throw away all your bathing soaps and bottles.

Replied by Kathy
Panhandle, Florida
11/12/2010

It is recommended to use virgin coconut oil for the body but not the face. What do we use on the face to help the skin look and feel softer?

Replied by Merryanne
Orange City, Florida, Usa
11/13/2010
120 posts
5 out of 5 stars

Hey Cathy, I don't know why some say not to put it on your face. I clean my face with 1/2 strength acv, I use cotton pads soked in it and rub my face really briskly all over, and don't forget your nose, then rinse with warm water, let dry, then take a pea size piece of Virgin Coconut Oil and melt it in my palm. Rub my hands together and put it on my face, neck, hairline, behind my ears, and take Q-tip and clean my ears, etc, etc get the picture- and if my hair is dry after that I rub both hand over my hair. All on one pea size vco, I eat 2 or 3 Tablespoons a day on my food, I am 63 and have no wrinkles- other women my age hate me :)

Replied by Francisca
Michelbach-le-bas, Alsace, France
11/13/2010

I do often use VCO on my face (I am 53) especially while sunbathing and I have never had a problem. But now I am trying a new eye cream I bought in my health shop: sequoia cream. I had never heard of it but the lady told me that it gives you energy and advised me to also put it on the skin inside my elbows. Other than that I often also use jojoba, or rose oil after first having cleaned my face with ACV (not diluted). People often say I look like I am my daughters' sister......

Replied by Ellen
Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada
11/13/2010

If you are using coconut oil on your face, then I would think this is what is making you look so much younger. I had this exact experience. I only use coconut oil on my face and would never use anything else as I have learned how many toxins are in moisterizers. Coconut oil is a safe moisterizer that is afforadable and not only moisterizes, but heals rejunates and protects your skin. I have a dog who had a skin condition that I cured with coconut oil and quickly. If people only knew how simple and easy it is to cure skin conditions such as ezcema, scabies, etc. With coconut oil. It's is truly a remarkable gift from God. Good luck, Ellen

Replied by Mimi00429
Los Angeles, Usa
01/06/2011

Dear Merryanne from Orange City, Florida,
How long have you been using the Virgin Coconut Oil on your face? Your information is appreciated. Michelle

Replied by Denniece
Colorado Springs
08/04/2016

Hi Merryanne, what is ACV? I want to try this VCO because I have tried everything on my skin. As I have gotten older my skin is no longer my friend. Now I am 60, my skin has problem with cool weather. I break out with welps that then have me just scratching all over. I pray I can find this work because the doctors are just making me spend on money on creams that have not worked. waiting for your reply Merryann, Thank you Denniece

EC: ACV = Apple Cider Vinegar


Posted by Sarika (Abu Dhabi, U.A.E) on 07/27/2009

I have been looking for a remedy for smooth skin. Tried olive oil but found it too greasy and had breakouts on my face. I want to try coconut oil on the skin. would be glad if anyone has used it could share their experience with me. Thanks.

Replied by Tavora
Brooklyn, NY
07/28/2009

Hi Sarika - coconut oil is a woman's dream (or at least for me!)...I sometimes use as it as an all over body moisturizer but mainly on my face. I wish I had taken before and after pics. Before VCO my skin was ruddy and blotchy - had dark marks, large pores and uneven tone. But NOW - not so! It's smoother, more toned, dark marks are gone and is nice and taut! I can see that "glow" people have commented about.....only thing is it doesn't seem to be clearing up my dark circles all that well. I've read drinking at least a gallon of water can help.

Tip: To ensure the oil is deeply saturated and is hydrating the skin - place a warm washcloth or small towel on your face after you've rubbed it on. Your skin will feel like butter! :0)

Replied by Lana
Destin, FL
07/28/2009

I like to use coconut oil for my body, but for my face it is a bit too oily, even in small amounts. I think it all depends on your type of skin.


Posted by Sia (NYC, NY) on 03/07/2009
5 out of 5 stars

I have heard coconut oil works well for some ppls acne but avocado oil is great for acne and overall nourishig your face. It an antibacterial, natural sunscreen and helps in the collagen process. Organic extra virgin cold pressed olive oil is also great for skin, been using it for over a year now although, I am 31 and ppl think I am 23. Will try the coconut oil for my slight cellulite though, thanks.


Posted by Shannon (New Glarus, WI) on 03/04/2009
5 out of 5 stars

After reading miraculous things about coconut oil a couple of years ao, I gave it a try. I read suggestions for what sounded like huge dosages, but instead I just started using it instead of butter on toast, and for cooking, and in hot cereal and baking--just to taste, like any other food. Other times I use olive oil, and I take fish oil sometimes. I like coconut oil a lot, and feel good with it, but my most interesting observation is that these past two winters have been the first in a long time when I've needed no hand lotion, and even doing lots of dishes doesn't dry my hands like it used to. And in general I notice that my skin seems much softer and smoother. But I can't imagine eating it straight off the spoon, or in the quantities some people talk about... Maybe some of the bad reactions are just *overdoses*, from eating more fat at once than the body's able to digest?

Replied by Mamasita
Vancouver, BC, Canada
04/20/2009

Thank you Shannon from New Glarus, finally reading some common sense here. I take cocunut oil in my food at normal doses, (the amount you would use any oil in your cooking) and i have not experienced any of these problems that i am reading so many people are having. I have noticed that most of these people are mentioning that they mix it in their tea or take it straight. You have to treat coconut oil like any other oil and use it wisely. Cook with it, mix it with your food in sensible amounts and you will experiece the true benefits. In countries that coconut is widely used, eg, India, south pacific ect..., you will never see the people eating it straight or mixing in their tea, they only use it to cook with and use to massage into their skin and skalp. They have used it in their cooking for thousands of years and never experience problems like we do in the west, we are too extreme. Its simple, be sensible dont overdue it, use it like you would use any other oil and you will be amazed by the benefits.

Replied by Jimmyjaya
Sibbu, Sarawak, Malaysia
04/08/2010

I was taken aback by the popularity of the VCO recently and the wide variety of its benefits recently when I read it on the web. We over here have been using it for time immemorial and little do we realise its true potential. Our method of extraction: boiling. The oil is mixed with other herbs for external application while the pressed milk is an ingredient in cooking. My grandmother used to choose different species of nuts for specific ailments. What we seldom do is to take the oil straight from the spoon and is what interest me in this thread. These are new ideas and experiences are learnt.Thanks everyone!



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