Bloodroot: A Medicinal Plant

Skin Cancer
Posted by Eric (Manvel, Texas) on 03/29/2007
1 out of 5 stars

One danger of using bloodroot paste on skin lesions (apart from risks of severe scarring) is that the user has no way of knowing if a tumor has been completely removed. As a pathologist, I know that malignant tumors often spread well beyond what's visible to the naked eye. Incomplete removal with bloodroot could result in extensive tumor spread or metastasis (a PubMed literature search (available online) turns up a number of cases where this has happened).

The aftermath of home use of bloodroot could be extensive surgery, plastic surgery repair and treatment for metastatic cancer. Physicians would prefer not to pursue these costly options, but to take care of the problem right away with simple procedures so that patients do not suffer unnecessarily. Please reconsider your endorsement of bloodroot products, as they are dangerous and ineffective.


Skin Cancer
Posted by Ally (Montreal, Canada) on 02/25/2007
1 out of 5 stars

The problem with bloodroot is that no research was done on it. I think you should check this out, it might make you change your mind about using this "miraculous cure": http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/Cancer/eschar.html