Natural Cures for a Bee Sting

Mud

3 User Reviews
5 star (3) 
  100%


Posted by Michelle (Lamora, Mexico) on 03/06/2008
5 out of 5 stars

rub wet mud on the bee sting. also frsh garlic clove cut in half, also we've used charcoal internally and rubbed on the bite, these have always worked.


Multiple Remedies

1 User Review
1 star (1) 
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Posted by Suzanne (Chattanooga, Tn) on 07/23/2018
1 out of 5 stars

Ambushed by yellow jackets! Can't see them all but think I have six stings, behind my knees and on my calves. Both legs. Since last night, I have tried Tecnu gel, lavender essential oil, internal and external ACV, crushed garlic, even took CBD oil. My muscles are really tight, hurts to walk. Ideas? Thanks!

Replied by Mmsg
(Somewhere, Europe)
07/23/2018

Suzanne, try a paste made of baking soda and water, or wet clay or wet activated charcoal (very messy).

Replied by Anon
(Usa)
07/23/2018

Ideas:

Magnesium, maybe soak in the tub with epsom salts

Rub isopropyl alcohol on the stings

Activated charcoal poultice

Rub castor oil over the stings

Rub cayenne on them, mix with castor oil?

Peppermint oil

Take antihistamine

Take vitamin c, e

Tea tree oil

Oregano oil

For mosquito bite rubbing salt grains into the bite makes it stop itching and go away

Maybe hold ice cube against bite.

Replied by Jim
(Frostburg, Md)
07/24/2018

I also heartily recommend MMSG's advice. A paste made with just water and baking soda has never failed me. Keep the paste wet for a half-hour and within a few minutes, it will greatly (greatly) reduce the pain and resultant swelling.

Replied by Jim
(Frostburg, Md)
07/25/2018

This remedy I gave is for use immediately after being stung or bitten. In the original poster's case, however, the effects are already manifest- and so this baking soda paste far too late to combat the venom. Perhaps a long soak in the tub with Epsom Salts?


Onion

2 User Reviews
5 star (2) 
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Posted by Mike (Missouri) on 12/09/2014
5 out of 5 stars

Onion does work very well for bee or wasp stings- simply cut in half, score the onion surface until juicy, and apply directly to skin/sting site.

It does not "draw out" the toxin, rather the onion juice/ phenolic compounds actually break down the proteins of the bee/wasp venom.

My 4 year old had a wasp sting on his back at one point- I held the onion to the site for 10 minutes, and swelling and pain were nearly gone... when I removed the onion, the redness and swelling visibly began to reappear (venom proteins were still present causing the reaction). I re-applied the onion again for 30-45 minutes, and pain and swelling reduced immediately, and permanently after that period of time. It's a great natural remedy... keep some on hand! :)


Onion
Posted by Leslee (Milburn, Utah) on 08/23/2007
5 out of 5 stars

Slice of onion took the pain away from a bee sting.


Peppermint Oil

1 User Review
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Posted by Ky Mama (Clinton, Ky) on 01/28/2013
5 out of 5 stars

We have a terrible wasp and yellow jacket problem. We usually use lavender essential oil for mild stings and charcoal poultices for more serious ones. But my children get tired of poultices and find them inconvenient, so they take off the poultices and they end up swelling up. I have found peppermint essential oil, undiluted, takes out the heat and swelling very well, even on bites that are a couple of days old and still bothering them.


Plantain

1 User Review
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Posted by Judy (Baltimore, USA) on 07/09/2007
5 out of 5 stars

The leaf of the common lawn broad-leafed plant known as plaintain will stop the pain from a sting in seconds. Just grab a leaf, or several if they are small or dehydrated, tear into small pieces, rub several stacked torn edges into the welt (first make sure the stinger is not in the welt; if it is, use something to gently scrape it out; do not use fingernails to pull on it because that will squeeze more venom into the welt). Plaintain also works for the itch of mosquito bites. In desperation I put 24 mid-sized leaves and 1/2 cup of water in small food processor and processed until it didn't have to be strained. Messy but effective. Less messy if you add 1/4 cup hand cream and shake it into the mixture (I used one with vit E, A and C). I kept the concoction in a jar in the refrigerator for over a year before it deteriorated, i.e., got watery and smelly; I used it many times


Rust

1 User Review
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Posted by Anj (UK) on 10/06/2006
5 out of 5 stars

In my mum's days they used to have most of the things made of iron so they used iron rust. Mostly people have honey in their homes. She used to say if a bee stings you in the garden or park you don't have anything there with you than the best alternative is the soil mixed with water but the black soil/ mud better results and this is used as a poultice which dries in few minutes so you don't need any bandages or tapes.


Sugar

1 User Review
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Posted by Suzy (BC) on 11/05/2006
5 out of 5 stars

I read it in a book then tried it myself the next time I got stung. Because I swell up so large around my stings and they last at least up to a week before my body rids the swelling. Now as soon as I can after I'm stung, I make a thick sugar water paste. I get a spoon and scoop out some sugar, then I add a tiny bit of water enough to make a paste that is not too juicy (not leaky) and not too dry to be crumbly. I apply it generously on top of the sting. Within 1 minute you will not feel the sting and there will be no stinging. I leave it on for about 20 minutes. That's it. It works beautifully!


Tea Bag

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
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Posted by Diana (Atlanta, GA, USA) on 08/23/2007
5 out of 5 stars

I, too, can vouch for the wonders of Benadryl, for dogs, people, and horses alike. I'd like to add that, having been stung on multiple occasions by wasps, I've found that a warm, wet teabag applied to the area of the sting will usually keep the pain at bay (I think it's the tannins in the tea). I don't know if it has the same effect on bee stings, but I've used it (in combo w/ Benadryl) on my dogs when they've been stung, and it really seemed to help. Thanks for your site!


Tobacco

6 User Reviews
5 star (6) 
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Posted by Robert Henry (Ten Mile, Tn) on 04/01/2017
5 out of 5 stars

My Tractor Driver now thinks I's a bright guy. With spring in the air we are leaving the doors open to soak in the fresh air. With that comes wasps. She just got stung on the finger and I told her that I had a 20 year old pack of cigs in the drawer just for this. She soaked one and made a pack with a paper towel. I wrapped this on the sting with Scotch tape and within minutes, she exclaimed, " Wow, this works".

The problem with tobacco is that it got polluted with Arsenic to kill the boll worms and the processors sprayed it with insecticides, fungicides, and pesticides. Is it any wonder this great herb now causes you grief? The American Indians used it in moderation for thousands of years. Us educated folks turned it into a death wish.

ATS====ORH======

Replied by Mama To Many
(Tn)
04/03/2017

Robert Henry,

Moist tobacco was what my granddaddy used on bee stings many years ago!

~Mama to Many~


Tobacco
Posted by Misty (Kingston, Ga) on 07/24/2008
5 out of 5 stars

This works great! My son got stung repeatedly in the yard one day. I put tobacco on all of them except one I didn't see. Only the one without it swelled. The others were completely without swelling.

Replied by Antonio
(Tuscumbia, Alabama)
05/22/2009

yea i just got sting by a wasp and the first thing i thought of was tobacco

Replied by Michelle
(Cairns, Far North Queensland Australia)
10/19/2010
5 out of 5 stars

I have recommended tobacco for years on bee stings. Just moisten & place on sting, & any pain & swelling will go within minutes. It works for bee stings - one anecdote was when my young nephew was stung on the foot. I immediately applied tobacco moistened with a bit of spit (I had no access to water at the time! ). Five minutes later I asked him how it was feeling & he had actually forgotten he'd been stung! Another anecdote - this time I was stung by a paper wasp (common in my area) whose sting packs a bit of a wallop. I immediately applied moist tobacco, & was grateful when 10 or so minutes later, there was no swelling & no pain. The only indication I had been stung was a small red dot where the wasp had penetrated the skin with its stinger. I highly recommend this remedy.


Tobacco
Posted by Susan (Humboldt, TN) on 07/30/2007
5 out of 5 stars

Tobacco is the best thing for insect stings. I always try to keep a pack of cigarettes and I don't smoke. But if you tear up one and dampen the tobacco and put it on the sting area it sucks the poison out and it quits hurting. It doesn't swell or itch either. If someone is chewing tobacco that is best (uck!). My Grandadday used it on me one day and it worked great.


Tobacco
Posted by Brenda (Vicksburg, MS) on 11/08/2006
5 out of 5 stars

My grandfather always wet tobacco and applied it to wasp or bee stings and it works immediately to stop the pain and swelling.

Replied by Texaninsweden
(Siknas, Norbotten, Sweden)
01/20/2010
5 out of 5 stars

Swedish Snus (steamed tobacco leaf), it is already wet and acts fast. I was stung below the ear and on the ear I applied the snus immediately. The pain was alleviated immediately and there as no swelling the next day.

Replied by Diane
(Lonsdale, Mn)
01/24/2010

We have used tobacco poultices since I was a small child for infections. I also used to feed a cigarette monthly to my goats and pigs to worm them. Works overnight!

Replied by Shampoogirl
(Jacksonville, Al)
07/06/2012

Snuff works too if it's applied IMMEDIATELY after a sting. I carry a small can with me when out, otherwise I'll have to go to the doctor for a shot after a bee sting.


Toothache Drops

1 User Review
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Posted by Pete (Brisbane, Australia) on 04/18/2009
5 out of 5 stars

Toothache drops: If you have been stung by a bee, ant or any other insect use a few drops of toothache remedy from your local pharmacy on the affected area. It numbs the area in seconds, no more pain.


Toothpaste

1 User Review
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Posted by Iluvigs (Springfield, Mo, United States) on 07/27/2010
5 out of 5 stars

I had read that toothpaste would relieve the pain of bee stings... Have used it myself, my husband and even used it on a dog with great success. Also worked on wasp stings .It does not relieve itching but does relieve initial pain. It was recommended to use paste rather than gel but if gel was all I had, I would sure try it. We keep a tube of paste clearly marked for stings only.



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