Itchy Skin Cures

Krill Oil



Posted by Shary (Centennial, Co) on 07/31/2010
4 out of 5 stars

Along with various other health issues, I've had chronically itchy skin for the past 2 years. The area affected is mainly around my torso. This is not a dry-skin itch. Scratching makes it worse. Sometimes there are tiny bumps or pimples, but often there is nothing noticeable at the site of the itch. I've switched soaps, shampoos, lotions, laundry detergents, the food I eat, etc. I shower with luke-warm water and don't use soap at all on that part of my body. I've also tried Apple Cider Vinegar, witch hazel, tea tree oil, you name it and I've tried it. Nothing really helped. Then about a month ago I started taking krill oil because it's supposed to be good for muscles and joints. Supposedly it has properties that ordinary fish oil doesn't have. I haven't noticed any difference with my joints, but within just a few days of starting the krill oil, almost all the itching and pimply rashes around my waist disappeared. I haven't stopped taking the oil so I don't know if it just medicates or if it eventually cures the problem. Either way, it's a big sigh of relief to get rid of the itch without using topical drugs. Take one krill oil softgel twice a day. Be sure to get 100 percent krill oil. Some brands are better than others. Check the list of ingredients on the bottle to make sure it isn't mostly fish oil.

EC: Excerpts from Wikipedia's entry on Krill Oil here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krill_oil

"Several studies have shown toxic residues in Antarctic krill and fish..."

Ecological Concerns

..."The harvesting of antarctic krill is relatively new. At present, no limits have been placed on the amount of Krill that can be harvested. This has caused a number of Marine biologists to express concern over the lack of research into the effect that such exploitation of Krill may have, not just to the long term survival of several species of baleen whales and the Adelie Penguin; but also in terms of other animals further up the food chain. In this regard, Antarctic Krill is fundamental to the survival of almost every species of animal that lives in the Antarctic or sub-Antarctic waters and island groups .[5]