Yeast Infections
Natural Remedies



Yeast Infections - Editor's Choice

Over the years, Earth Clinic readers have sent us many reports about their treatments for Yeast Infections. The editors at Earth Clinic consider the below posts to be some of the most helpful and informative and have named them 'Editor's Choice'. We hope that you will find this useful.

White Vinegar  

Posted by Sharon Marshall (Clearwater, Fl) on 11/04/2017
5 out of 5 stars

Jean!! You are absolutely correct. (Jean from San Marcos, Ca on 03/15/2012)

My veterinarian told me that my dog would have problems for the rest of his life with chewing on his legs and infections. He also has very stinky ears and the vet prescribed antibiotics!! So then his body and ears smelled terrible due to the yeast infections. We did out internet research- gave him a bath and sprayed him down with the white vinegar with water rinse that you leave in (50/50). The white vinegar has worked so very well it's amazing. I thought he was going to smell terrible with the vinegar but the vinegar smell quickly went away and so did the yeast smell and he is so much happier now!! I'm not too happy with my vet but glad your baby and mine are doing better! 😊


Dakin's Topical Solution  

Posted by Mommadd (Florida) on 01/25/2016
5 out of 5 stars

I love homemade Dakin's Solution - for external use ONLY - it dates back to its use during the Civil War. It is a stellar bacterial killer and it is very effective on yeast. It is also great for cleaning your dog's ears. It doesn't burn. The over-the-counter stuff is costly (for people and for animal use) BUT you can make it at home for pennies.

I started using this solution for a son who developed cystic acne - great results. I then realized this stuff will kill yeast!

I dab the solution on the dog's yeasty spots with cotton balls and the next day, scrape off the dead yeast and apply another dose. It takes a few treatments and my dog is large - so it takes some time. It's so worth it as the yeasty smell is gone instantly and itching is calmed.

Making Dakin's Solution

1. Wash your hands with soap and water.
2. Measure 4 cups of water into a clean pan.
3. Boil the water for 15 minutes with the lid on the pan. Remove from heat.
4. Measure 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda into the boiled water using a sterile measuring spoon.
5. Measure bleach, based on the strength chart below, into the boiled water using a sterile cup or measuring spoon. For my dog's thinner skin, I use the 1/2 strength* recipe vs. the full strength:

Full Strength – add 3 oz bleach
*1/2 Strength – add 3 Tbsp + 1/2 tsp bleach*
1/4 Strength – add 1 Tbsp + 2 tsp bleach

1/8 Strength – add 2 1/2 tsp bleach

6. Place the solution in a sterile jar. Close it tightly with the sterile lid.

Allow to COOL before use. I shake the jar before use to ensure the baking soda is dispersed.

Store the solution at room temperature. It will keep in dark storage for a month. Once opened and exposed to air, the solution deteriorates. Throw away any unused portion 48 hours after opening -- and make a fresh batch.

Obviously don't add more bleach than what is listed. Do not use if there is an allergy to the ingredient(s). Stop using the solution if the situation worsens and get to a vet.

I hope this helps someone else and their beloved dog.


Borax  

Posted by Em (San Francisco) on 11/09/2015

Hello,

In response to Raine (Marsh Harbour, Abaco, Bahamas) on 06/20/2013

Please know that your pup can recover from a serious yeast infection. My pup is an 80lb, 13 year old Australian Shepherd mix. Late last year my pup had been attacked by fleas which brought on the yeast infection. A couple months later he had taken a dose of antibiotics for an eye infection (unrelated to yeast infection) which in my opinion aggravated the yeast condition. He had an yeast infection head to toes, especially under his arms, the groin area, paws and even his nails beds. Not to mention he had blepharitis and mucousy eyes.

I've had to wash him once a week with a natural shampoo (I use braggs but I don't think it matters) plus borax most important. I sprinkle on 10 Mule brand borax found in laundry section and rinse with diluted equal portions white distilled vinegar and water (50/50).

I add borax to the rinse as well. You can spray his yeasty body parts with this rinse mixture a couple times a day. Let the pup air dry. In my experience, I think you have to wash your pup once a week with borax at least while he has the yeast infection.

I've also alternated using diluted 1 portion hydrogen peroxide (3 percent) to 3 portions water plus borax to spray infected areas. I've also used diluted iodine to rinse his paws.

You'll see an immediate improvement after the first wash but if your pup has a serious infection then it may take months. My pup is 90 percent better and I expect that he'll be fully recovered by the end of the year.

I added a little borax or baking soda to his drinking water. Pls check Ted's protocol on this. Hope this helps.


Multiple Remedies  

Posted by Debbie (Portslade, Uk) on 01/07/2015
5 out of 5 stars

Yeast Infections in Dogs: I can only tell you what worked for me.

I have 4 Shihtzus. When one of them was a puppy, he started to become quite poorly. Took him to the Vets. Who diagnosed severe Yeast issues. They started pumping him full of steroids and antibiotics. We kept going back to the vets. He was getting worse, to the point, I thought I was going to lose him.

He was fed on commercial puppy food.

I started, doing loads of research. And, discovered that steroids and antibiotics actually 'feed' the yeast!!

So, no more Vets........ I also researched dog food. And that anything with wheat/grain in, was feeding the yeast also. That's when I changed to raw feeding. No fruit or veg for him either as there are natural sugars in many. For that reason, I don't use ACV for him. I started bathing him in a good quality anti-fungal shampoo. Rinse well. And then with a mixture of half water/half, distilled WHITE vinegar. Soak the dog in it. 'Dunk' the paws in a bowl of it. Flush out the ears also with the mixture. (As long as the ear drum is not perforated).Then leave it on the dog, to dry. DON'T rinse off. Get a spray bottle and make up a new solution. Use this every day where there are any skin issues and spray inside the ears. Clean out any 'gunk' with it. Dunk the paws daily in a new solution. Doing it, just before bed time, is the ideal time to do it. Also, after a walk etc.

The crucial thing is diet. Add some probiotic yogurt. Garlic. Good quality, Virgin coconut oil. Every day. Plus of course. Raw meat/Offal/Tripe/fish. Some bone. But, find out about raw feeding, so you know what to give. Minus, fruit and veg for a dog with yeast issues. NO treats or biscuit. Unless home made. For a dog with yeast issues. It has to be done for the lifetime of your dog.

If you need to heal any sores before you get it under control. Use a mixture of neem oil and coconut oil.

If antibiotics are needed. Use Colloidal Silver. Or, it will flare up again.

Don't give tap water to drink. Only, bottled or filtered. NO, table scraps. I now have a very healthy 5 year old.

When he has a bath, it's always with the anti-fungal shampoo, followed by the white vinegar/half water rinse. I also, always clean his ears with it. He has an issue with one ear, because his ear canal is VERY narrow. So, I also shave his ears, inside and out. So, he has no hair irritating his ear.


Dietary Changes  

Posted by Mypapagaio (Newport Beach, Ca, Usa) on 06/04/2012

I am shocked at the number of replies from people on here that do NOT fully know what they are talking with regards to yeast infections in dog. I just read somebody suggested a lady whose dog is suffering be put on a strict diet of no meat? What? This person obviously does not know that yeast infections "thrive" on sugar. So, just like us humans, anything we eat in which our body converts to sugar will only feed the yeast. Ideally the dog should be on a raw food(meat) diet but it is very tricky to get the righ balance so it is highly recommended you do not attempt to do this on your own. High quality pet stores offer premade raw meals for your dog. However, they are expensive. SO, a kibble dog food that does NOT have starch or grains is what your dog needs. RESEARCH, RESEARCH, RESEARCH!!! Yeast is a serious thing because most vets will just assume it is allergies or some other type of infection and inevitably do the worst thing... They will put your dog on anti-biotics. This is the absolute worst thing imaginable for a dog that has yeast infection.

So, start googling all over the place and read everything you can. I don't have time to go into it all here. But, a permanent diet switch to a meat based food with no starch or sugars. Also, antifungal remedies for weeks and weeks if not months as your dog will be purging his toxins through his skin and it itches something terrible. He MUST get daily supplements to rebuild a healthy level of pro-biotics in his system.

Now, move on to another 10 blogs and keep reading up!


Multiple Remedies  

Posted by Sierrahennessy (Fairfax, Usa) on 10/01/2011
5 out of 5 stars

Joanne in Buffalo, NY

I have been reading about your dog with my heart in my mouth. So much of your story reminds me of my own struggles with Sierra, my 12 1/2 year old dog. Sierra has always had yeasty ears ever since we got her at age 8 weeks. We had it under control until her mate King died of DM a few years ago. Then it exploded in our face. We tried everything, were at the vet's multiple times, spent thousands on meds, including steroids and antibiotics. Finally, I switched vets and came with Sierra, who was in agony from joint pain, vaginal infections and loss of hair, black skin, stink and ulcers everywhere! Her coat was matting from the oozing. I told Dr. Lynch point blank I wanted everything in the arsenal for attacking YEAST, which hadn't been done before because nobody listened. He gave me ketoconazal, an antibiotic for the infections in the ulcers and vagina, medicated anti-fungal shampoo to be used twice weekly and a drying powder for taming the ooze. He diagnosed her with severe systemic yeast infection. He also said based on her pain levels, we might have to euthanize her in a month. I came home depressed.

Later that night, I started research. I was prepared to lose my dog in any number of age releated causes. But NOT to a stupid fungus. I began with the lessons I learned from King's DM, when the vet told me when he was 8 that western medicine had gone as far as it could. I took King to an alternative vet, who gave him another 3 amazingly good years using herbs. I decided to take that approach with Sierra. It's been two weeks and the turn around in her heath, her outlook and the decrease in her pain level is nothing less than amazing.

Here's what I learned and did.:

First, food change. I got really picky, went ONLY for low glycemic no grain food. Sierra was on Wellness chicken her whole life, which I still believe to be a quality food for dogs without yeast issues. Her lifetime of good food and medical health may have saved her life (more on that later). I moved her off that and onto Hund n Flocken by Solid Gold. She only eats the can and sometimes not even that, but I believe elimination of sugar and simple carbs has helped with starving the yeast. I don't think its possible to be picky enough about her food. No more Mother Hubbard treats for Sierra. Just duck jerky, which she likes. No more bones, which will contribute to her gut issues.

She had a full set of bloodwork. I read that yeast and thyroid issues go hand in hand. Have both T3 and T4 checked. Every time she has a blood test, the Drs. call me up amazed, saying she has the bloodwork of a dog half her age. It is this organ strength that I believe allowed the Dr. to attack the yeast with his full arsenal at full strength, I gambled on her lifetime of health.

Including pain pills, Sierra is on seven pills in the morning and six at night. We give her pill pockets to get them down her. We use the drying powder three times a day for her ulcers. Only 2 persistant ones (in the armpit) of about 20 remain.

Additionally, after research, I decided to give Sierra Bovine Colostrum, the first milkings from a cow that gave birth. Colostrum is believed to assist in healing the Leaky Gut syndrome, sealing the holes in the intestinal wall and replacing the mucosal lining. I also decided to give her Black Walnut tincture, a major anti-fungal of nature.

We wash Sierra twice a week with the medicated anti-fungal shampoo.

I have two more weeks until we see the Dr. I think we've acheived nothing less than a bloody miracle. The black skin is slowly disappearing and hair I thought I'd never see again has already returned. Her joint inflamation is significantly reduced, and she goes up and down stairs better than in years. Her crusty oozing eyes have cleared completly. She's stopped licking at anything other than normal brief cleanings.

Her ears are still yeasty and likely always will be, despite the fact they are upright and they are correctly formed in the ear canal. (we had the vet look a long time ago).

Here are some other things folks might find useful, by the way, the great dane lady website is fantastic.

Natural Treatment Ideas

Use probiotics/digestive and dietary enzymes to keep the pH balance of the stomach in proper balance. This in turn helps prevent yeast overgrowth.

Use raw apple cider vinegar or lemon juice - 2 teaspoons per day on food or in water, to help keep the pH balance where it should be in the gut and make an environment, which is not conducive to yeast proliferation.

1. Bathe in sulfur-based or medicated shampoo
2. Prepare a 50/50 mixture of Apple Cider Vinegar & Water
3. Rinse or wipe affected areas with 50/50 mixture daily. Note: Do not use Apple cider mixture on open lesions

For pets with itchy skin from yeast infections, use a Baking Soda rinse alone or after shampooing your pets body with the appropriate pet shampoo for fungus infections (see vet). It will be quite helpful with the overall itchiness, skin problems and inflammation. Ask your veterinarian for his recommendations.

Baking Soda Recipe:
Mix two (2) teaspoons of Baking Soda per gallon of warm water; make sure to mix it so it completely dissolves - pour over pet, do not rinse off.

A mild spray from Tea tree oil will discourage your dog from digging at the skin (because the bitter taste). Aloe Vera, Omega fatty acids, and Neem oil are effective treatments. In mild cases it already can be helpful to wash your dogs skin with apple cidre vinegar or use aloe vera.

If you are not sure about the nutritional values, and biochemical processes in the body, add a high-quality nutritional supplement to your dogs food which contains vitamin B complex, folic acid, vitamin C, zinc, magnesium, selenium, iodine, biotin, echinacea, and potassium.

Neem
The most important characteristic of Neem (neem tea, neem leaf) is, boosting both the lymphocyte and cell-mediated immune system. Neem boosts the production of T-cells, which defense your dogs body when attacks to the immune system occur.

Vitamin C
Vitamin C is crucial for boosting your dogs immune system. Vitamin C has essential antiviral and antibacterial activity, but its main effect is improvement of host resistance.

Omega Fatty Acids
Omega fatty acids are important for your dogs immune system, skin and coat health. Omega fatty acids boost food utilization and energy production. Evening primrose oil is most effective (omega 6 fatty acid), followed by flaxseed oil and fish oil (omega 3 fatty acid).

Zinc
Zinc deficiency increases the risk of infection. Studies show that zinc supplements can boost the immune system, promote wound healing, and help develop white blood cells.

Dog food diet for immune system related dog skin disorders:

Dogs with skin disorders and skin rashes need a special dog food diet, low in carbohydrates.
Whole grains and fiber in the dog food are advisable, to boost the immune system on a long term basis. You can serve the same kind of meat or vegetable for 3 to 4 days, then switch if possible.

Basic dog food: Mainly oats; whole grains; barley, for variation: smashed potatoes

Meat: Mainly duck; for variation: rabbit, turkey, lamb, fish, veal

Vegetable: Garlic, parsley, carrots, watercress, alfalfa sprouts, zucchini, avocado, artichoke, celery - they are great toxin relievers for the body. For better digestion mix the raw vegetable in a blender , and add it to the dogs food.

Fruits: Chopped coconut, apple, banana

Dairy: Plain yogurt or cottage cheese to re-colonize the intestinal flora

FOODS TO AVOID FOR DOGS:

Commercial dog foods and treats which contain the following ingredients:
Meat-by-products, poultry-by-products, meat meal, wheat flour, wheat gluten, corn meal, corn gluten, rice flour, brewers rice, BHA, BHT, Ethoxyquin

- Rice, MSG, chicken, pasta, milk (because it contains lactose), bread, cookies, crackers,
- Peanuts, yams, sausage, bacon, corned beef, smoked meat and sausages.
- Onions, tomatoes, mushrooms, salt, ketchup, grapes, raisins.
- Sugars, sucrose, fructose, corn syrup, fruit juices, honey, chocolate, or maple syrup

Probiotics

Probiotics (beneficial yogurt like bacteria) keep the flora/fauna of the gut at good levels in the digestive track. When this flora/fauna is killed off due to antibiotics we must re-seed the gut with probiotics at the same time!! .

But Probiotics/Prebiotics, keep fungus/yeast at lower levels in the gut as long as it is supplied daily in your pet's diet and we can't fully depend on it on some dog foods. Once there is yeast overgrowth, probiotics alone will not push the levels back down. It requires supplements to alter the pH of the environment, kill off the yeast, remove the yeast die-off from the body, and probiotics to reseed the gut with beneficial microorganisms.

Chlorexidine at 2 to 4 percent might be effective against yeasts, 0.5 to 1 percent is not effective.

Miconazole (Dermazole ®, Resi-zole® leave on conditioner) is also effective.

Vinegar/water rinse (1/5 to 1/10) is a cheap and effective long-term maintenance treatment to prevent relapses in dogs that are predisposed (swimmers).

Colloidal silver may be administered to dogs as an oral supplement in liquid form, through IV injection, in a nebulizer cup, as a spray or topically as a liquid or cream. It may also be combined with a powder for dry application or to create a paste. It can be used to flush out wounds, as ear drops, eye drops or applied directly onto the skin of your dog. It can be applied to your dog's gums or used as a toothpaste to help eliminate bad breath and tooth decay.

Dogs: 70 to 120# canines can tolerate 1 to 2 tbsps. of colloidal silver 3x/daily during illness. If fever is present or the dog has gone off feed, we will dose a high initial loading dose and then back off to 10 to 15 cc's/day (2 tsp. to 1 tbsp).

Aloe Vera: Aloe Vera has long been used to treat skin ailments. It has many nutrients and properties beneficial to the skin. Aloe Vera is used as an anti-inflammatory agent. It also provides anti-bacterial and anti-fungal aid. Once again, going straight to the source will provide a more potent treatment. Apply the gel from a leaf of the aloe vera plant directly to the skin rash. If you are not able to find one or do not wish to extract the gel yourself, you can find aloe vera extract at many stores. Apply at least 3 times a day.

Baking Powder: Rub baking powder over the skin rash. Baking powder will dry up the rash and help relieve the itching.

Olive Oil: Olive oil is recommended to soothe dry skin and restore moisture. The skin can also benefit from the healing and renewal properties of olive oil. Skin rashes can be treated by applying olive oil to the affected skin. (Me: Coconut Oil, organic, cold pressed also works well, internally and externally, its a great anti-fungal and dogs love it.)

I have a whole lot of further info. Regarding recipes for these things, if anyone is interested. I also have aromatherapy suggestions that really helped, but honestly, I think I've gone on enough! I wish everyone a safe and fantastic cure.