Bladder Infection, Chronic
Natural Remedies

Chronic Bladder Infection Remedies

| Modified: Jul 04, 2018
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Frequent or chronic urinary tract infections can be wearisome to the body and mind. Finding the cause, changing some habits and adding some natural remedies to the routine can prevent and even bring permanent resolution to long term bladder infections.

Risk Factors Chronic UTI’s

  • Anatomic abnormalities
  • Poor immune function
  • Hygiene oversights
  • Dehydration
  • Low estrogen levels
  • Continuous catheterization
  • Kidney stones
  • Diabetes
  • Neurological diseases

Making use of one or more of the following remedies on a daily basis can make all the difference in avoiding chronic UTI’s or preventing frequent attacks.

1. Hydration

Keeping the body well hydrated is important for general health and in keeping the urinary system flushed in particular.

Using quality liquids for the majority of the fluid intake is important. Plenty of pure water daily is essential.

Coffee and soda should be kept to a minimum and may need to be avoided all together for sensitive individuals.

2. Herbal Tea

Plantain or dandelion tea are teas that can be used daily that benefit the urinary system.

For occasional use, cornsilk, horsetail, and juniper berry also benefit the urinary system.

3. Cranberry

Quality cranberry juice is used daily as a UTI preventative for many.1 For prevention of infection 3 ounces of pure cranberry juice (make sure it has no extra sugars or artificial sugars) can be used. It is easiest to take added to another juice like 100% grape juice or apple cider. Cranberry capsules are another option for those who do not enjoy cranberry juice or need to keep sugars to a minimum.

4. Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar, a top bladder infection cure can be used daily to prevent UTI’s. 2 teaspoons are added to a tall glass of water. Consume this tonic daily. Or use the following tonic:

Earth Clinic's UTI Prevention Tonic

  • 3 ounces of pure cranberry juice
  • 2 teaspoons raw apple cider vinegar
  • 5 ounces 100%  concord grape juice

5. D-Mannose

The simple sugar D-Mannose prevents bacteria from sticking to the walls of the bladder and allowing them to be flushed out of the system. D-Mannose supplements are easy to take daily as a preventative.

6. Vitamin C

1 gram of vitamin C, in the form of sodium ascorbate powder, can be taken several times daily to optimize immune function.

1 gram of Vitamin C before and after intercourse is another way to use vitamin C to prevent bladder infections.

7. Zinc

Zinc is often deficient in the diet. A simple zinc supplement supports healthy immune function.

8. Vitamin D

Vitamin D is another important vitamin for the immune system. Because vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin (and will not be flushed out of the system like water-soluble vitamins) it should not be taken in large amounts over long periods of time due to the risk of Vitamin D toxicity.

If daily sunshine is not an option, a modest supplement of vitamin D may be appropriate. Having vitamin D levels checked through labwork if wise if Vitamin D supplements are taken long-term or in high doses.

9. Helpful Hygiene Practices for Chronic UTI’s

The admonition to wipe from front to back after emptying the bladder is important to heed to prevent bacteria from reaching the bladder entry.

Emptying the bladder after intercourse (within an hour) is also crucial.

10. Topical UTI Prevention Salve

Topical use of coconut oil and tea tree essential oil after intercourse can also be used to prevent chronic UTI’s.
Here is Earth Clinic's simple recipe:

  • 20 drops of organic tea tree oil
  • 2 tablespoon of virgin coconut oil

Keep this oil mixture in the bathroom and used daily, after intercourse, or as needed.

Everyone responds differently to remedies. It may take time to figure out the best cure or combination of cures to keep UTI’s at bay. Be encouraged to persevere and please share your remedy (or combination of remedies) for chronic UTI’s when you have figured it out!

Sources:

1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4519382/