Traditional Chinese Medicine Remedies at Home!

Last Modified on Jan 18, 2014

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is far more than acupuncture. The holistic herbal and energetic treatments of TCM are exceptionally effective and increasingly well-regarded by patients and modern medicine alike.

While traditional Chinese medicine has ancient roots, it probably is more popular than ever especially as it expands more vigorously into the West. Chinese herbalists, massage therapists, and Gi Gung practitioners are increasingly available throughout the world.

Chinese medicine does incorporate the ideas of balance described by the principles of yin and yang as well as the concept of chi; however, TCM is likewise very concerned with six other principles including trying to balance the body's "hot" and "cold" influences and with the interconnected nature of the body's organs along its energy meridians. The Chinese medicine expert is always seeking a healthy homeostasis.

Natural Cures: As opposed to Western healthcare models, Traditional Chinese Medicine sees the appearance of disease as a failure of medical practice to prevent illness in the first place. Thus TCM is always concerned with keeping the body in proper balance and therefore good health.


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User Reviews




Adaptogens   0  0   

Posted by Lisa (Thousand Oaks, Ca, Usa) on 11/03/2012

Hi Everyone, I know a few of you have expressed an interest in Chinese herbs. Also, that you would like to learn more. I just received this video of Ron Teeguarden a master Chinese herbalist speaking on what determines how fast we age.

http://www.longevitywarehouse.com/Articles.asp?ID=540

I am finding my health becoming stronger, my energy even and calm and my mind clearer from taking Chinese tonic herbs. They build the body and the adaptogens work in both directions and regulate the body to find its homeostasis. It has been just over 6 months in which I have been taking them on a regular daily basis and it is amazing! I found it very interesting and I hope you do too. Lisa

Replied by Sara
Sacramento, Ca
11/04/2012
Thank you so much for sharing this video. I am glad your health is getting better. Can I ask you what tonic herb are you taking for your health? I know it is a combination of so many herbs. You may live long and thrive.
Replied by Lisa
Thousand Oaks, Ca, Usa
11/04/2012
Hi Sara, I'm so glad you enjoyed the video. I thought it had some valuable information and it is what I am adhering to these days. I have found the Chinese herbs to be so effective. The tonic I take is called 8 Immortals and is quite powerful. It has wild Chinese ginseng, wild American ginseng, duanwood reishi, wild mountain reishi, pure cordyceps, wild Tibetan rhodiola, wild schizandra, goji, wild snow lotus and ho shou wu. As you can see it contains many adaptogens and builds strength and all three treasures- jing, qi and shen.

I recently also added a goji and schizandra tonic with this because the benefits of these two fruits are amazing. I am seeing my skin really change. I have stopped taking all other supplements except betaine with my meals lypospheric vitamin c and shilajit. I don't think I've ever seen the results I'm having with other supplements. Here's to health! Lisa

Anti- Aging   0  0   

Posted by Lisa (Thousand Oaks, Ca, Usa) on 08/15/2012

Hi everyone, I just wanted to comment on the latest newsletter which referenced the healing power of buckwheat. I just learned that afternoon after receiving the newsletter that ho shou wu otherwise known as fo-ti is part of the buckwheat family. It is a Chinese herb highly revered for its healing abilities and maintenance of health. My friend who is a Chinese herbalist posted this info on his FB page of which I will give excerpts from. I know some of you are interested in learning about Chinese herbs so I thought you might enjoy reading about it. :

"This anti-aging herb is commonly known in the west as Fo-Ti root (or Fo-Ti-Tieng) and is a member of the buckwheat family. This western nickname was given to it in the 70's and is now its most commonly recognized name. The latin name for the Fo-Ti root's whole plant is polygonum multiflorum. The Chinese name is He Shou Wu which roughly translates as Mr. Wu's hair stays black. This should give you an idea of the potential that fertility herbs can have on your health, especially as you supposedly "get older".

Traditional properties:
He Shou Wu is a premier yin tonic and anti-aging herb that can be consumed daily to increase your human longevity potential. It is sweet, bitter, astringent and slightly warming. It affects and tones the liver and kidney meridians. He Shou Wu will increase your energy levels, however it is not a stimulant. It is in fact a Jing herb and slightly sedative. It stands out among the top fertility herbs and builds sexual staying power for men and women (as all yin tonics do)."

This is only a small excerpt from what he wrote so for those of you interested in reading the article in its entirety, you can find it here:

https://www.facebook.com/SovereignTea

I always love learning new info so hopefully, you found this interesting too! BTW, he is an amazing healer and someone I look to for health maintenance! Lisa

Bloody Nose   1  0   

Posted by GT (Vero beach, Florida) on 08/24/2007

[YEA]  Old chinese meds method of stopping a bloody nose. I have used this many times: Take a snipet of your own hair or someone elses hair. Burn this to ashes, mix with a drop of water into a paste. Apply on top of the nose not in the nose. Bleeding stops in seconds!

Chinese Herbs   0  0   

Posted by Loraine (Orlando, Fl) on 04/18/2013

Hey Lisa/Bill....I'm curious to know what is your take on herbs like Rehmannia/cordyceps/schizandra. I have adrenal/thyroid issues that does not seem to respond to anything I use. I recently learned about these and am anxious to try them but I figured why not run them by EC before I do. I trust you guys that much. Lol. Help please!!!

Posted by Sara (Sacramento, Ca) on 12/01/2012

Dear Friends, I bought some Shazindra, Goji Berrry and Radix Astragali from a local Chinese store today. I know how to take Goji berry, but I do not know how to take Schazindra and Astragali. Do I need to soak the Schazindra in the water over night or boil it in the water to make tea out of it? I will appreciate if you guys share your knowledge or experince here with me. Thanks, Sara

Replied by Lisa
Thousand Oaks, Ca, Usa
12/01/2012
Hi Sara, Schizandra is a very unique berry, highly prized in Chinese medicine for its adaptogenic qualities. It is a potent general tonic, decreasing fatigue, enhancing physical performance and promoting endurance. It's also known for improving concentration, coordination and preventing mental fatigue. You can eat a couple of berries a day for its benefits. You could just soak them in water and drink the water and eat the fruit or you could also make tea from them. My husband and I take a goji and schizandra tincture daily. So you could also make a tea with both of them together.

One thing about Chinese herbs is that they will often put them in food to raise the overall health value of the food. You could add the radix astragali in soups which is what I do when we make chicken soup. There's actually a "kit" of adaptogen herbs we used to always get in Chinatown which we would add to our soup.

Anyway, hope this helps. Enjoy your Chinese herbs! Lisa

Replied by Sunrose
Altadena, Ca
12/02/2012
I use 1 cup berry to 1 gallon water. I was told to bring to a boil then simmer for at least 40 minutes. not sure on the others.

Cold Showers   2  0   

Posted by Dave Murray (Derby, Uk) on 08/31/2011

[YEA]  I recall reading that part of the Spartan regime at Gordonstoun School in Scotland is/was cold showers. HRH Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh attended this school and he has recently reached his 90th year. The cold showers haven't done him any harm have they! As for me, I have just discovered them. Kind people have given me a shower head, curtain etc so it's only cost me a few pounds to make my cold shower. It's great!

Posted by Dave Murray (Derby, Uk) on 08/31/2011

[YEA]  I recall reading that part of the Spartan regime at Gordonstoun School in Scotland is/was cold showers. HRH Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh attended this school and he has recently reached his 90th year. The cold showers haven't done him any harm have they! As for me, I have just discovered them. Kind people have given me a shower head, curtain etc so it's only cost me a few pounds to make my cold shower. It's great!

Posted by Linda (York County, Maine) on 03/12/2009

Hi Chris... I've done a little cold showering and I'm not as dedicated as a lot of folks, but I like to start with a warm (not hot) shower in order to wash up...also, I haven't used soap in ever so long and haven't missed it, just scrub really well with a shower brush...once I'm finished washing, I turn the water just a little colder for a couple of minutes exposing my pulse points to the cooler water first, then allowing the rest of my body to be bathed in the cooler water...after 2 or 3 minutes, the water begins to feel not so cold - kind of like going swimming in the lake - once the water feels warmer, I turn it another notch colder for 2 or 3 more minutes, etc. until I feel like getting out of the shower. I read that it takes 3 minutes for our blood to completely circulate through our bodies; I have no set time that I stay in the shower but always feel really good afterward. When I do this in the evening, the boost in my circulation energizes me enough to finish my bedtime routine, get into some warm jammies and enjoy a good night's sleep!

Posted by Linda (York County, Maine) on 03/12/2009

Hi Chris... I've done a little cold showering and I'm not as dedicated as a lot of folks, but I like to start with a warm (not hot) shower in order to wash up...also, I haven't used soap in ever so long and haven't missed it, just scrub really well with a shower brush...once I'm finished washing, I turn the water just a little colder for a couple of minutes exposing my pulse points to the cooler water first, then allowing the rest of my body to be bathed in the cooler water...after 2 or 3 minutes, the water begins to feel not so cold - kind of like going swimming in the lake - once the water feels warmer, I turn it another notch colder for 2 or 3 more minutes, etc. until I feel like getting out of the shower. I read that it takes 3 minutes for our blood to completely circulate through our bodies; I have no set time that I stay in the shower but always feel really good afterward. When I do this in the evening, the boost in my circulation energizes me enough to finish my bedtime routine, get into some warm jammies and enjoy a good night's sleep!

Posted by Chris (crip52@hotmail.com, Alberta Canada) on 03/11/2009

You wrote, "Cold showers, used properly, are a tonic for the entire body." Sould you please elaborate more on how to use them properly? Thanks, Chris

Fever   4  0   

Posted by Tia (Oaxaca, Mexico) on 01/12/2011

[YEA]  Tried this on my husband as he had a fever, with chills and aches. After about 15 minutes, his fever broke and he started sweating. It's been two hours and he is still cool to the touch and says he feels stronger. Amazing! Thank you so much for sharing this great remedy!!

Posted by Tia (Oaxaca, Mexico) on 01/12/2011

[YEA]  Tried this on my husband as he had a fever, with chills and aches. After about 15 minutes, his fever broke and he started sweating. It's been two hours and he is still cool to the touch and says he feels stronger. Amazing! Thank you so much for sharing this great remedy!!

Posted by Karina (Munich, Bavaria) on 11/07/2009

Dear Helen, I just heard from a Chinese friend about this method in order to heal upset stomachs and was fascinated. Do you still remember some of the knowledge of your grandma in order to bring the ying/yang into harmony? If you ever find resources about this kind of treatment I would love to hear about it. It is so simple and effective. Blessings & Thank you!

Posted by Karina (Munich, Bavaria) on 11/07/2009

Dear Helen, I just heard from a Chinese friend about this method in order to heal upset stomachs and was fascinated. Do you still remember some of the knowledge of your grandma in order to bring the ying/yang into harmony? If you ever find resources about this kind of treatment I would love to hear about it. It is so simple and effective. Blessings & Thank you!

Posted by Helen (Southport, Australia) on 08/21/2008

[YEA]  This is another way of applying egg white for reducing fever that I learnt from my Chinese Grandma. Hard boil the egg and remove the egg yolk. Put the hard boiled egg white including the shell in a handkerchief. Twist the content into a ball and massage body from head to toe. Brings the temp down instantaneously. My Grandma would also insert a silver ring in the egg white content when massaging. Silver would change to different colours when rubbed on different patients. This was used to diagnose the cause of the fever and then she would use (ying/yang) herbal treatment for the illness. Sadly, I am unable to read the silver ring. My children always ask for an egg massage when they have high temperature and it always does the trick.


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