Anal Gland Remedies for Cats and Dogs

Last Modified on Sep 15, 2014

Anal gland problems occur when our pet's feces are too soft, and while passing through the glands, do not empty them completely. If the glands produce too much liquid, it can thicken and clog they will become clogged. Dogs and cats have two anal glands beneath the skin near their anus. You will know that your pet is having a problem when they begin to lick themselves frequently and attempt to drag their bottoms along the floor. Luckily for you, this is a situation that you can look after at home! However, if the glands have become infected, which would include signs such as, the glands themselves appearing red or discolored, the animal experiencing severe pain, developing a fever, loosing their appetite and becoming lethargic, it is at this point that you need to get some immediate medical help.

How to Clean Your Pet's Glands: Here's how you can clean out the glands yourself. Enlist the help of another person to help hold the pet and make sure that you both change into some old clothing and wear some disposable gloves. Use an old blanket or sheet to lie underneath the animal as the material that is removed from the anal glands will be smelly and can cause stains on carpets etc. Clip away any long hair beneath the tail so that you can see what you're doing. With one hand, lift the tail way up over the animal's back so that you can expose the glands (these will be located at 5 and 7 o'clock positions on the anus). You will be able to feel if they are full. The ducts that will actually empty the glands are located a little bit higher at 4 and 8 o'clock. In a milking type fashion, use your thumb and forefinger to squeeze the glands in a C-shaped sweeping movement. The fluid will probably be a dark brown to clear color, however if it is yellow or blood tinted, it is likely that your pet has an infection and should see a veterinarian immediately.

After you have finished, sooth your pet's anal area by applying a warm, wet cloth to it. Once the cloth cools, warm it again with water and repeat the process for at least ten minutes at a time, three times per day.

In an effort to eliminate problems of impacted glands, there are a few changes that you can make to your pets regular diet. Increase their fiber intake by adding a fiber supplement to the food. You could also offer your pet some fresh vegetables such as Carrots, Cabbage or Celery. However, you should be aware that increasing the fiber in your pets daily diet will in addition to helping them express or clear their anal glands, also increase the size of their droppings.

Print Print

Most Popular Remedies:

Pumpkin8 YEAS

User Reviews



Carrots   2  0   

Posted by Kathryn9 (Owings, Md.) on 04/13/2014

[YEA]  I have an update to another post about this issue. To date, I have been giving my poor old dog 1/4 large carrot chopped up over his dry dog food, a half tsp. of this glucosamine powder with Omega 3 6 9 also.

No anal gland stop ups ever so far on this routine every day!!!

Posted by Cathi Watson
East London, South Africa
05/13/2014
Good Afternoon. My female Boston Terrier has serious anal gland blockages. You mention 1/4 carrot every mealtime. Do you cook the carrot or grate it over the dogs food raw?
Posted by Theresa
Mpls., Mn
05/13/2014
586 Posts
Hey Cathi!

Raw is preferred if your dog will accept it.

Posted by Kathryn4 (Lanham, Maryland, USA) on 03/05/2013

[YEA]  My old beagle mix dog would get this all the time. Drove me crazy. What works finally is always give him 1/2 of a chopped up carrot over his food. I also give a squirt of the salmon oil so he won't scratch anymore. I had tried apple for many eyars but noticed his glands would always get blocked anyway. Switched to carrot and it has been much much better! Let us reduce the vet's salary:).

Coconut and Coconut Oil   3  0   

Posted by EVELYN (TAMPA, FLORIDA) on 03/11/2009

LOVE THE WEBSITE IS VERY UPLIFTING TO KNOW THERE IS A CURE FOR THIS PROBLEM THAT POOR DOGS AND CATS CAN FIND RELIEF AT LAST THROUGH THE TESTIMONY OF OTHERS IT REALLY TOUCH MY HEART BECAUSE WHEN OUR ANIMALS SUFFER WE SUFFER WITH THEM TOO I JUST STARTED TO USE THE COCONUT OIL AND PUMPKIN ON MY POMERANIAN THANK YOU FOR THE INFO

Posted by Terri
Ravenna, Ohio
04/06/2009
Dear Evelyn from Tampa; How much pumpkin & coconut did you feed your pom? I have a pug who is having the same problem. I remembered hearing about this so I looked it up, but now I need to know "exactly" how much you use... Thanks, Terri from Ohio
Posted by Belinda
Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
08/28/2009
I have a 5 month old miniature dachshund that was experiencing discomfort associated with blocked anal glands. I read on a website to feed them pureed pumpkin as the fibre helps to clear the blockages. I boiled the pumpkin in plain water, then drained and pureed. Once cool, I gave him 1/2 a cup that night and 1/2 a cup the next morning. It worked a treat!! He has had no more symptoms.

Now i will freeze a batch in portions and give him some each week.

and he LOVES it!

Posted by Mary Ann
New Delhi, New Delhi, India
11/17/2009
Belinda, I have just read your mail and am going to try the pumpkin remedy on my 2 yr old dachshund, the poor little mite has been so ill over the last week. I am Mary Ann from New Delhi, India. Will let all know the results. Cheers!
Posted by Lorayne
Sun City, Az
01/23/2012
Dogs can develop pancreatitis from high fat foods. That's why they shouldn't be given turkey skin or avocado for example. I would be very careful with the coconut and coconut oil. Other things that are poisonous to dogs are: onion, garlic, walnuts, macadamia nuts, chocolate, avocado, turkey skin, grapes, raisins, xylitol, any sugar alcohol, artificial sweetners. Almonds and brazil nuts are O.K. in extremely small quantities as they too are high in fat and can cause pancreatitis.
Posted by Kate
Charlotte, Nc
05/29/2012
2 Posts
Lorayne your post about dogs developing Pancreatitis from high fat foods has one error with regard to Coconut Oil. CO is different, it is a healer and likely the best oil on the planet. On The Whole Dog Journal website in an article from Nov 2008, Mary Straus details about Canine Pancreatitis. In the article she discusses how to heal naturally and one snippet is about Coconut oil where she says: "Dogs fed a very low-fat diet may become deficient in the fat-soluble vitamins A and E. Adding fish oil and coconut oil to the diet can help with this. Dogs with damage to the pancreas may also suffer from vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency" Coconut oil has been misunderstood for many years.

For others petalive.com has an herbal formula for topical application with many testimonies. I have it now and am using it with my dog (GSP).

Posted by Stephanie
Douglasville, Georgia, Usa
06/18/2012
7 Posts
In response to...."Lorayne from Sun City, Az

I disagree with some of your foods listed. Actually Garlic is not only SAFE for dogs it is good for them. It helps repel fleas, mosquitos and clean the intestinal tract of parasites (worms HATE garlic) We give all three of our pitties one 1000mg liquid-gel every day (regular human vitamins) They love it and actually beg for it. My girlfriend has to sprinkle powdered capsules on her dogs food and some people chop raw cloves for thier dogs. We give the pills to ours straight and can hear them pop the pill and chew it up! Also walnuts are not toxic either. You just limit them because of fat. We give these on occasion when we are snacking on them.

Avocado is controversial, from my research the skin and the pit are toxic, the meat is the controversial part... Some authorites say its perectly safe and even nutritious and others say it is also toxic. There is even a dog food that contains avocado. So to err on the side of safety our family has decided not to give avocados to our dogs. There are too many other options that are known as safe.

I have also given our dogs coconut oil but I suspect a link between it and nail fungus in dogs with a weaker immune system. They get it very rarely as a treat for example with thier monthly worming which is 1 can of tuna fish (if packed in oil I don't add extra oil) 1 capsule of Black Walnut Hulls - Heart Worm prevention (found at health food store or cheaper online) 1 tsp finely chopped raw green pumpkin seed - Intestinal wormer (found at grocery store, health food store or online) 1 capsule of echinacea, 1 capsule acidopholis and 1 capsule of ginger. It does not look appetizing but they gobble it up.

Tuna fish or canned chicken has been the best thing I have found to get anything in them, they always lick their bowl clean. I have three larger dogs weighing an average of 60lbs so adjust to your dogs weight. I learned all of this right here on EarthClinic.com. Thank you to everyone who contributes!

Posted by Linda
San Francisco, Ca, Usa
09/14/2012
45 Posts
I don't think avocadoes are toxic to dogs, and here is why:

One of my family members has an avocado tree in the backyard (It's huge and produces masses of fruit). As soon as those avos are ripe, the dogs (5) will swipe those avocadoes the minute they hit the ground and eat them totally, leaving nothing behind. They wait for them and love them. These dogs have done this for many years, we all have sat and laughed about how they love those avocadoes, and how one has to act fast if you want to get any from that tree.

They eat the skin, the meat, the pit, the whole thing. Entirely. No sign left that there was ever an avocado there.

PS: These are Organically grown avocadoes and are unsprayed with any pesticide nor chemical fertilizers. That may have something to do with it.

Namaste, Linda

Posted by Nell
Oxford, England
03/12/2013
I am here to correct you all, as you have it all so wrong! I am qualified in animal care, canine nutrition and have worked with dogs for 11 years.

It is a total housewives tale that dogs cannot have avocados!! There has been no proof of toxicity for dogs at all, the pip is to be kept away from them purely for choking reasons, avocado however is really rich so it should be given in tiny amounts and gradually to most dogs. Some dogs may always get an upset tummy on it due to its richness.

Coconut and coconut oil again are NOT toxic but they are a natural laxative so it should be avoided for this reason only with dogs.

Turkey skin, meat skins in general in itself CANNOT cause pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is either commonly specific in some breeds, like spaniels are prone or can be caused by food intolerances/ allergies, or thirdly by feeding FAT trimmings, a little bit of fat that marbles in meat is good, but giving dogs lots of fat scraps/trimmings will cause pancreatitis is most. Dogs shouldn't be fed skin on a regular basis as it is simply a little too fatty for a regular EVERYDAY diet.

It is high time people stop spreading these ill advised rumors about. My dog is currently under a holistic vet who specialises in canine nutrition too, together we are making a great team! He confirms everything I say here today, and on the case of advocado he suggested I try my dog on a little for his dry skin problem, however in my dog's case it was too rich for him even in a spoonful quantity!

Dogs are like people, some foods will just not get on with them for whatever reasons, my dog has colitis, a severe chicken allergy and is allergic to beef, pork and most farm animals! He has low B12 levels and hayfever as well as other allergies. Which is why I am working wit a holistic vet. We do not put pharmaceuticals and toxic things like flea sprays in my dogs system due to their cancer causing chemicals. Also over vaccinating has been proven to cause many conditions like colitis. A vaccination these days stays in their system for up to 3 years.

While you are all worrying about silly little foods, the SLS and sles chemicals in your dogs shampoo and chemicals in flea sprays and household cleaners are the real things to worry about!

The main foods to avoid in dogs are;
- Chocolate (DEADLY ESPECIALLY DARK, theobromine in the chocolate can cause death)
- Macadamia nuts (no one knows why)
- Onions (highly toxic)
- wild growing mushrooms (toxicity levels vary)
- grapes (highly toxic)
- Alcohol
- caffeine
- marijuana!
- De icer- MASSIVELY TOXIC

Again to the people who argue that their dogs have had the above and been okay, all these items have been proven to definitely be toxic AT SOME LEVEL to dogs, like anything or anyone you occasionally have a dog lucky enough to have eaten these items and been okay, also it varies due to the quantity eaten, if a tiny chihuhua eats just one small square of chocolate it will most likely die. If a great Dane did then he probably won't even get a bad belly. My dad told me when he was a kid they gave their dog chocolate ALL the time! Yet I witnessed a small spaniel die from eating half a box of maltesers last year.

Posted by Elaine (Edmond, Oklahoma, USA) on 06/04/2008

[YEA]  My little chihuahua would yip whenever he would have a bowel movement. His stool was also hard and light in color and hard to pass. Thank God for this site it saved me a vet bill. I remembered reading about coconut oil for people. I went to the kitchen and got a small amount on my finger, pried his mouth open and smeared in his mouth. I thought he would really protest, but he seemed to like the taste. Sure enough the next day he had a very healthy bowel movement. It turned out he had a swollen anal gland. I put witch hazel and hydrogen peroxide on it. It ruptured, drain and his fine now. I LOVE THIS SITE!

Posted by Peggy
Delbarton, Wv, Usa
08/18/2011
15 Posts
Elaine, did you have to take your pet to the vet to be diagnosed with anal gland issues? I am using the coconut oil with my biggest dog whose had some problems with her AG. The vet wants her shots updated before seeing her. I do not want her to, so I'm trying to take care of things myself. The "perfume" smell she emits lets me know it's these glands. She loved the coconut oil and I even glazed the pan with it before baking her yam treats. I realize it's been a few years since your post but I'm hoping like me you check back here often. :)
Posted by Apryl
Aiken, South Carolina
01/02/2012
I have the same problem with my dog. He is a fairly big male (70)pds. He seems to have anal gland problems often. He has expressed them on my bed a couple times.. Puhhhhh!!! I feed him "Halo" dog food and put some brown rice in it as well, but it doesn't seem to be helping him! So, I thought of going online to enquire about.. Here I am! I will try these (coconut & pumpkin) and see how it goes. I'm so glad I found this page, thank you!
Posted by Katherine
Townsville, Queensland
02/22/2012
Hi, could the lady that treated her dog for the absessed anal gland that ruptured let me know if it cleared up on its own. My little chi has a ruptured one as well and I am just bathing it with warm salty water to keep it clean. Did she have to get an antibotic as well.
Posted by Julie
Bridgwater, Somerset, England
11/19/2012
Could someone please tell me how much coconut oil you give to your dog along wilth pumpkin and how often??? Also for how long (days/weeks/months) do they need to take this for their anal gland problems? Also do we give our dog this pumpkin/coconut instead of her food or mixed in with her food? All answers gratefully received.
Posted by Kathy
Charleston, Wv
05/07/2014
I can't recall the site, but I believe it was 1/4 teaspoon of coconut oil for every 10 lbs of weight. This was the dosage for overall health, digestive, shedding, cleaning plaque from teeth, etc. I was giving to my dog daily but I have reduced it to 2-3 times a week. My dog's weight is 60 pounds and I usually give her a heaping teaspoon (a little under the recommended dosage). Her coat is very shiny, and her shedding has decreased. My cats won't take, I liquify the coconut oil and use a syringe to give to my cats once a week. The solid will liquify at 72 degrees or warmer, make sure if you melt it, that it is not too hot to give by mouth. They also have a coconut oil softgel that is easy cosumption and to put in ears to clear up mites or parasites in the ear. I suggest you research yourself -- just "Google" coconut oil uses for pets. PSS - I take coconut oil myself.

Posted by Wendy (Lacey Township, NJ) on 02/08/2008

[YEA]  My Golden had a problem with emptying her anal glands, which led to several trips (quite often) to the Vet. My first approach in solving the problem was adding canned pumpkin to her diet. She got 1/4 cup twice a day, with not much success. I heard about using coconut in her diet and after using it for two months, the problem has resolved itself. I I still give the pumpkin and have added 2 TBS of organic, low fat, sugar free coconut twice a day. No scooting in this house!

Posted by Sue Ann (Beachwood, NJ) on 11/17/2006

[YEA]  I read an article in a natural dog publication I receive about giving a dog with anal gland iissues unsweetened coconut and coconut oil (both can be purchased at a health food store). The coconut bulks up the stool with fiber and the coconut oil softens the bulked up stool a bit. For a dog about 30 lbs., you work up to 1 teaspoon of the coconut oil, and work up to 2 teaspoons of the unsweetened coconut. The coconut has to be soaked in water until its wet so it can be digested more easily. I only began this remedy 2 weeks ago, but don't notice my dog "scooting" as much as he used to.

Diet   0  0   

Posted by Tttailor (Worcester, Ma) on 08/18/2012

My Toy Fox Terrier has the same problem and I switched her food to Science Diet WD which is a precription diet food from her vet. She no longer has any problems. I did try switching her to an organic dog food and her glands flared up a few months after the change. Went back to Science Diet and not messing with her food again!

Garlic   1  0   

Posted by Tony (California) on 05/23/2014

[YEA]  The first time I found out about anal glands I went to the vet and the wanted to do surgery. It was so bad that he was bleeding out of his butt. I said no to the surgery and they put him on antibiotic. And then had to see the vet again. It was costing too much and he was not getting better. Some one here mentioned that garlic was bad for dogs. Wrong! In desperation to make him better I cruched and put three cloves on his food, since he would not eat it I called my other dog who was healthy and will eat anything and he cleaned up the ill dogs bowl. The next morning the ill dog did not wait for the competition and cleaned up his bowl. I kept both dogs on this routine of garlic in the morning and at night neither one had any ill effects, and the infection cleared up. I do not do it on a regular basis because I have an inside dog, but I know of people that regularly feed their dogs garlic to keep fleas away.

General Feedback   1  0   

Posted by Sandi From Texas (Caldwell, Texas, Usa) on 06/17/2012

In May of 2008, Sue from Ontaga, New Zealand posted her vet had prescribed a medication that healed her dog's fistula and that she was going to find out the name of the drug. I cannot find another post from her. Am I just overlooking it.... has anyone heard from her.

I am in a desperate situation with my dog and am going to try several of the ideas from this website, but would still like to know what Sue got from her vet.

EC: Here's where you'll find her post: http://www.earthclinic.com/pets/anal_gland_issues.html#HOMEOPATHICGUNPOWDER3X

Posted by Lucille (Mahwah, N.j.) on 08/17/2011

i'D LIKE TO KNOW WHAT KIND OF COCONUT, DO U GIVE UR DOG. I HAVE A 7YR. OLD POM, & HE'S ALWAYS , SCOOTING. I CAN'T FIND THE PUMPKIN, I'LL LOOK AGAIN, BUT WHERE DO I GET THE COCONUT?

Posted by Peggy
Delbarton, Wv, Usa
08/18/2011
15 Posts
[YEA]   "I found the coconut oil at Walmart today. It's not in the typical oil container so you have to look. The unsweetened coconut can be found in the baking isle or a health food store. I have three dogs and they all three love the taste of coconut oil. The post above yours gave the dosage and said to soak the coconut in water, so the dog can easily digest it. As for the oil I just put some on my fingers and they eat it off. I also glazed a few dog treats that I made myself with some c.o. they really like the taste of it.
Posted by Lori
Appleton, Wi
10/06/2011
I have a Springer with Anal gland issues. About every 3-4 months I have to take her in to have them expressed. The vet now told me to try 1-2 TBSP of Pumpkin (Not pumpkin pie filling) 2 times a day. I will be trying that after we get over the infected gland issue. (I find the pumpkin in the grocery in the aisle with the pie fillings in). You just need to be sure it is 100% pure pumpkin. Until reading this site today I have never heard of the coconut oil remedy. I will have to look into that also. Thanks for the tips!!
Posted by Bonnie
Littlestown, Pa
01/05/2012
You can find pumpkin in the aisle with the pie fillings. At least that is where it is in our store. Don't get pumpkin pie filling make sure the can says 100% pumpkin. There is a big difference. My son gives his dog pumpkin regulary and I am going to try it for my dog. I take her to the vet today to have her glands drained and then am starting with the pumpkin. I hope this helps get rid of the smell...

Homeopathic Gunpowder 3x   1  0   

Posted by Dharma (Phoenix, Az) on 04/17/2007

[YEA]  Hi, About 20 years ago I spent thousands on antibiotics for my Borzoi's anal gland infection. I finally had a radionic analysis done and the homeopathic, Gunpowder 3x was prescribed. It can be highly antiseptic/antifungal. Since then I have seen that in animals if antibiotics do not work it is often fungal. For whatever reason gunpowder 3x has saved more than 1 animal from dangerous surgeries and amputation.

I do have a challenge I am working on and would like some advise if any have suggestions. What would you use for a deep anal fistula in a German Shepherd? What is generally used is an immune suppressant such as cyclosporin and it works well at close to $300 a month forcing many owners to have to make terrible choices and with cyclo it is evident that the animal feels awful and soon will begin to limp and become very weak. This is common in Shepherds and is quite a challenge.

I have tried the standards such as Silicea, Arnica Calc Sulph. Some temporary relief from Glyconutrients mixed with Three Lac but then it fights back and gets considerably worse. I thought primal defense or Ohira's would do it but not so.

Posted by Sue
Otago, New Zealand
05/14/2008
I also have a german shepherd with an anal fistula. It was the size of a pea and growing - opening fast. The vet put him on some over-the-counter drugs, (Very very Inexpensive) about $20 worth, and it closed up like magic. Since then he has been on a low dose of prednisone for about 2 years, I am now wanting to get him off that so have started weaning him very slowly and at the same time changing his diet to include coconut oil, kelp milled flaxseed, acv, yoghurt and a few other bits and bobs. So far so good. Every time I googled "Fistula" up popped thousands of sites on Crohns Disease in Humans. It appears to be very similar, so in the end I searched for natural cures regarding Crohns disease. If you want the name of the drugs I initially used to HALT and SHRINK the fistula, I will find out for you.
Posted by Ruth
Wichita, Ks.
01/06/2009
Tell me about the radionic analysis....

Question on dog anal glands. I am going to try the pumpkin and coconut. My Murphy (Shi-TZU) has very small openings on his glands. I feed him raw diet meat and veggies. His stools are solid, but I'm guessing it is because of the small openings that the glans need expressing so often. Can't be expressed from the outside. Tech or vet has to go in internally. Poor little guy. Now only 3 weeks apart and had a litlte infection last time. Hoping the coconut and pumpkin work on him. He loves the pumpkin right out of the can!

Posted by Saida
Fort Collins, Colorado, Usa
02/03/2010
My 9yo German Shepherd has severe perianal fistulas. Atopica (cyclosporin) helped at first but it came back. Now it is really bad, he is on Protopic (topical immuno-suppressant?) and it doesn't look like the fistulas are healing. The treatment is very expensive!

For Sue from Otago, New Zealand: Could you please give the name of the drug you used? Thank you!!!

Posted by Angelina
Redondo Beach, Ca
07/09/2011
SUE! Please do let us know what is the name of the drugs I initially used to HALT and SHRINK the fistula, I will find out for you.
Posted by Shelly
Garden Valley, Idaho
07/16/2011
I am also interested in finding out the name of the inexpensive over the counter drug used to cure the perianal fistules. Sue from Otago, New Zealand, I hope you are still checking in and will send the info.
Posted by Sharlynn
Sprague, Washington
09/01/2011
Yes Sue please would really appreciate the names of those meds.
Posted by Diana In Tx
St. Hedwig, Tx
03/27/2012
My cocker spaniel has been scooting for a few months. The vet said he just needed his AG expressed. That hasn't worked. Then they thought he might have worms. So they de-wormed him, he's back to scooting. When I took him to the groomer last week she pointed out that the glands in his neck (like our lymph nodes) and on the back of his legs were huge like maybe he was going to get sick. Do you think this is due to the AG issue? Should I start giving him pumpkin and coconut?

Homeopathy   2  0   

Posted by Maria (San Francisco, CA) on 03/31/2009

[YEA]  One of my dogs (I have 2) has had problems with her anal glands since she was a puppy so, I learned to empty her glands myself. I can't afford relaying on Vets and their assistants for that. They just look after money: Veterinary is a big business. Just that.

Occurred twice that my dog's glands got impacted and when I pressed it, pus came out from there, she was also scooting her but a lot so... I treated her with homeopathy. On the first day: I gave Belladonna 6X , 1 pearl each 2 hours (at least 15 min. apart from meals, water or treats), direct on her mouth. She was kind of quiet but eating normally.

On the follow day I started with Silicea 6 X, 1 pearl each 2 hours again apart meals. Within 3 days she started to come back to herself and in 5 days she's good as "new" but the treatment is supposed last for total 10 days.

When they are nervous or agitated for any reason I give Flowers of Bach, which is usually the "Rescue Remedy" (3 drops on their mouth) Few hours later they're fine.

Posted by Cynthia
Chennai, India
06/18/2010
2 Posts
You said that you used Belladonna. What symptoms did your dog have that had you decide that?

I only had Silica 30C and it seem to make it worse, so I went back to Heper Sulf. From what I've read, the Silica pushes stuff outside of the body and the HS makes it go away.

My dog has been getting better with HS 30C three times a day.

From what I have learned in Classical Homeopathy, I don't give a "course of treatment," but I observe the symptoms and that rule what I do.

Oh, and I had my dog on heavy antibiotics and they were no miracle cure for this.

The Silica 6x is supposed to be good for pushing stuff out of the body. I need to get some and try it. It would be good to hear experiences that people have treating the anal sacs. I could see that you might need to alternate them. Of course again, we go by the symptoms. Also, a trained homeopath would go by more than just the problem with the anal sacs and look at the dog as a whole.

Another thing, I feed my dog only raw meat and meaty bones. This is the first time he has ever had this problem in six years. I had to leave him for two weeks just after he was bitten and getting rabies shots. Google the raw meat diet and that might be something you want to consider.

Posted by Mccavalier
Mckellar, On Canada
05/29/2011
[YEA]   "My understanding in treatment of anal gland abcess is to give low potency hepar sulph first up to 3 x daily until the abcess breaks, then use Silicea to clear it away. I also use a cue tip to keep the hole open until all the pus drains away. In addition I use a warm water and natural soap compress several times a day. This procedure works very well.

Probiotics   1  0   

Posted by Lori (Maryland) on 09/30/2013

[YEA]  As I read through the article on anal gland issues and then comments, I didn't notice anything on probiotics. My dog had several instances with impacted anal glands including them getting infected. The vet prescribed an antibiotic. But the second time he prescribed an antibiotic, the infection went away but came right back (like a child's ear infection would). So I thought about my kids and decided to try a probiotic. It worked great. In fact, it worked faster than the antibiotic. And now I add it to his food about once a week. He was already getting a healthy Merrick brand food, carrots and a little olive and or coconut oil. I have to be careful with olive oil and coconut oil. More than just a little and they will actually cause the impaction. My dog also can't have any steak fat or too much apple.

Prunes   2  0   

Posted by Cindy (Reese, MI) on 01/06/2008

[YEA]  A few years ago, German shepherd was very smelly and vet had to express his anal glands. After the 2nd trip to the vet in less than a year, plus the fact that the dog greatly dislikes going to the vet, did some research on Internet and found out someone recommended prunes. I give my 88 lb dog 2-3 prunes per day and have had absolutely no problems since. Was concerned that prunes might be in the same family as raisins (which are toxic to dogs) and possibly toxic but have not been able to find definite information. If there is a problem with giving dogs prunes, I would appreciate if someone would post something to that effect.

Posted by Brandie
St Louis, MO
09/10/2008
I just wanted to say that prunes are NOT related to raisins. Raisins are dried grapes, and the grape seed is what is toxic to dogs. Prunes are dried plums. Since plums have a large pit, before drying they remove that pit. I dont think there is any problem feeding a dog prunes. I'm not sure if you will see this, I noticed that it has been quite a while since you posted, but I thought I would tell you anyway.
Posted by Liondogsden
Big Spring, Texas
12/30/2011
Raisins are dried grapes, grapes can ferment into wine that is why they are toxic.

Prunes are from prune plums when dried they are prunes and not related to the grape family.

Posted by Jes
Jackson Heights, Ny
02/07/2012
[YEA]   "I started with 2 prunes for my Beagle. I now give her one prune daily and no scooting. I have to try to figure out how to get my cat to eat them since she has a scooting problem now.

Pumpkin   8  0   

Posted by Opinion02122 (Attleboro, MA) on 08/21/2014

My dog just started with anal gland problems. I spoke to two different vets and was told a teaspoon of pumpkin a day will do the job. My dog is a 27 lb. Cavachon. The size of the dog I'm sure has an impact on how much to give, so check with your vet. Also, make sure it's 100% pumpkin and not pie filling. Check the ingredients!


next page



 



DISCLAIMER: Our readers offer information and opinions on Earth Clinic, not as a substitute for professional medical prevention, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with your physician, pharmacist, or health care provider before taking any home remedies or supplements or following any treatment suggested by anyone on this site. Only your health care provider, personal physician, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for your unique needs or diagnose your particular medical history.

Copyright © 2014 | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | About Us | Contact Us | Search