Poison Ivy Remedies

Green Tomato  

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Posted by Carolyn (Milford, Ct) on 12/26/2010
5 out of 5 stars

Green Tomato: Green (unripe) tomatoes contain a compound which perfectly neutralizes the toxin found in the poison ivy plant. It can be rubbed on the skin if you know that you recently came into contact with the plant (and thus absolutely prevent a reaction) or, if you have a full-blown case of the oozing pustules (yum), it can cure them pretty quick. Just cut green tomatoes in half and rub over the affected area. If the sores are already present, do this 3-4 times the first day and once or twice the second day. Just use freshly sliced tomatoes each time. The itching will soon stop and the sores will begin to quickly dry up. I've had people come back and hug me for this tip.


Hot Water  

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Posted by Celad (Kearney, Nebraska, Usa) on 12/01/2009
5 out of 5 stars

I don't remember exactly under which ailment I first found it, but the spoon heated with hot water to stop itching for several hours is great. I needed it for multiple (maybe hobo) spider bites that were driving me crazy. As I recall there was something about the heat driving histamines away.

Therefore it also works for poison ivy, oak and sumac. There was a very helpful comment about the urushiol being the active agent and once that is washed off (of everything!) the clear fluid from the blisters is not an irritant. Thankfully I just got a very mild case (through a hole in a jersey glove I think) between my middle and ring fingers on one hand. I just ran a trickle of hot tap water over it as long as I could stand it a few times (maybe I only needed to do it once ;-) and that was way hot enough to assuage the itch, again for several hours.

Getting a child to bear the heat for even a short duration is another topic!

Thank you, Earth Clinic!!

Replied by Big T From Kc
Independence, Mo
09/02/2010
5 out of 5 stars

You are correct in your assumption. Oddly enough, I got the info straight from a physician, which you would think would try to prescribe some medication to help fund the medical establishment. This is how it was described to me and the reasoning behind why this works. Get the water as hot as you can stand, without burning yourself. (I have a higher tolerance of pain and have burned myself in the past, but over time, worked out the perfect temp. ) What the hot water does, is releases the histamines in that area of your body, that is being treated. Our body has an allergic reaction to the ivy. With allergies, what do we take? Anti-histamines. So, with the hot water releasing these histamines, that cause the allergic reaction, there is nothing there to cause the itch. I was told that it can take your body, on average, 4-8 hours to replenish the histamines in the applied area, so it depends on the person I suppose. My own personal experience, I get relief from the itching for about 8 hours. When it starts to flare up again, another hot water treatment. Another interesting thing occurs too. The use of the hot water tends to dry out the affected area as well, thus the reaction to the ivy only lasts 3-4 days and it's gone. The drawback to it though, is now you've got dry skin for a few days. I don't experience that too often, but it does happen on occasion and really isn't a big deal to me. But, you could use lotion if you were so inclined. What used to be an 8-10 day irritation, aside from the frustration of trying every over-the-counter method to no avail, is now completely gone within a 3-4 day period. Plus, water is much cheaper than anything else you purchase. I used to hate mowing the grass or working in the yard, due to the ivy that grew along my fence. Now, I go at it with wreckless abandon, not worrying about the ill effects of the reaction, because I've found the perfect way to take care of the problem. IT WORKS! Besides that, what have you got to lose, water is basically free.

Replied by Mountanpalm
Boone, Nc. Watauga, Usa
09/04/2011
4 out of 5 stars

So happy to find another living being that is on the same page as I am. Found this "hot as you can stand" remedy on the internet ten yrs. ago..... I stand by it today. I must have a high tolerance....... As people flinch when I explain the process....... I no longer do the "bathtub'.... Instead the shower...... Which you can regulate better when you get to the point of "intolerance" and move out of the way alot faster..... I get the same sensation as a good "scratch of the itch"..... With the hot water..... And revel in it. (sick, I know, but "ahhhhhh") But it works...... Lasts for 6-8 hours... Itch free for 8 hours........ I'll take it anyday. NOTHING over the counter works this good... I also use calamine to quicken the drying process...... Thanks for your comments!! [I am suffering from a terrible case as I write this......... But there is light.... at the end of this tunnel.]

Replied by Jim
Cabrera, Dominican Republic
07/23/2012
5 out of 5 stars

This is a great description of how to use the HOT water method. It works for me and takes away the itch instantly for long periods of time.


Posted by Sarah (Northampton, Massachussetts) on 08/11/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Hot water really works for poison ivy! I turned the water up almost all the way, and ran it over my arm, where the poison ivy is. It did burn a little bit of course, but now there is absolutely no itch! I am also rubbing baking soda with white vinegar in it to get rid of the actual rash.


Posted by Alan (Toronto, Canada) on 03/27/2007
5 out of 5 stars

I have had poison ivy numerous times, and while I have not found anything to cure it there is a very quick and easy way to relieve the itching for up to an hour or two at a time: hot water. If you take the infected area and hold it under VERY hot water (in a shower for example), you will get an immediate sensation of relief. I put the water as hot as I can stand it (being very careful not to burn your skin... it sounds strange but it's easy to do because even burning temperatures offer the same relief). When you're done the itch will be gone for about an hour or two at a time. If you're really getting so you can't stand the itch - try it. for the worst exposures I've had 4-5 very hot showers daily and it really makes the itch far more bearable. Again, be very careful not to burn the skin or you'll take even longer to heal.


How to Develop Poison Ivy Immunity  

Posted by Rebel (Somewhere Usa) on 05/08/2014

I have been seeing all the post about Poison Ivy and had to rack my brain to find the website that has some info on it. This website has all kinds of information on all kinds of wild plants and a video on Poison Ivy consumption to become immune to breaking out with the stuff.

http://thesouthernherbalist.com

then click on News Blog and find video on poison ivy.


Hydrogen Peroxide and Aloe  

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Posted by Keira W (Placerville, CA) on 11/25/2008
5 out of 5 stars

We live in a wooded area and no matter how often we point out the poison oak to my son he keeps getting it. He gets it so badly on his face that his eyes almost swell shut and his face swells up. Last night he said he was getting it again and sure enough his face was getting red and swollen. I came on to Earth Clinic's website because I always find great remedies. I read over the ideas and we decided to try the 3%hydrogen peroxide and freash aloe vera. I put some hydrogen peroxide on a cotton ball and gently patted it all over the poison oak (avoiding the eyes, eyebrows and hair-it will bleach hair). Then without rinsing it off we applied fresh aloe vera gel from my aloe plant. This morning I could not believe my eyes, the poison oak rash was completely gone! We have never had anything work like this. Thank You Earth Clinic!


Jewel Weed  

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Posted by Linda (Erlanger, Ky) on 05/03/2009
5 out of 5 stars

I came into contact with poison ivy ( once again ) in our back yard while helping my husband do some gardening. I have had it many times in my life, but this time was the worst! I had it on both forearms and both lower legs. In fact, I looked like I had been badly burned on my right leg. I went to the dr 3 times for this. I was given oral steroids, a steroid shot, antibiotics ( in case of infection ) and topical steroid cream. These were all ok but the thing that worked wonders for me was a tincure I picked up at a local vitamin and natural product store that contained jewel weed. After using this stuff for about 3 days, I had amazing results and I am almost healed now. I have suffered from this rash now for over 2 weeks! This stuff is amazing!

EC: Jewel Weed (aka Touch-Me-Not) often grows near poison ivy and is easy to locate. Good photos here.

Replied by Jewelweedbunnie
Washington, Dc, Usa
12/06/2010
5 out of 5 stars

I picked up a Jewelweed tincture at my local health food store too. I'd had a poison ivy rash that wouldn't go away for over 2 weeks. The Jewelweed tincture cleared it up in 3 days. Now I'm never without a bottle of it in my house. I've tried it on mosquito bites and it's *great* on eczema too.


Posted by Charles (Hillsdale, New York) on 12/12/2007
5 out of 5 stars

Jewel weed I use this every year now on poison ivy. If used right away you never get it, but if you have had it for a while, jewel weed will at least relieve itching but it does not seem to eliminate blisters. Still, when you don't itch having poison ivy seems bearable.

Replied by Janice
Washington, Pa. 15301
06/10/2013

Help! Need to find Jewel Weed in Washington, PA. Tired wasting my money on Drs. & steroids. Thanks janicecchreffler [at] yahoo (dot) com.

Replied by Mama To Many Donate

Middle, Tennessee, Usa
06/10/2013

If you can't get Jewel Weed, try some of the other things on the poison ivy page here at Earth Clinic... some really good ideas there that are easily available.

Also, I have a teenage son who has had severe poison ivy many times over the years. He has had to take steroids for it numerous times. However, this summer he has been exposed a few times and has only had mild cases. Perhaps it is because he is super careful, but I think some other things have factored in as well. A few years ago he had bad asthma. Over time we were able to get him off all prescription and over the counter drugs and inhalers. We found for him that if he took Nettle Leaf powder capsules (3-4 capsules 2-3 times a day) and a Quercetin Capsule twice a day, he no longer had trouble with asthma! If allergy symptoms increased a bit (this always set off his asthma, as did any sickness) he would take a few extra quercetin and nettles capsules.) He took this daily for a year or more. I think it actually helped to heal him. Now he just takes it as needed. But since Nettles can be used for skin rashes, I always have him take some if he has been exposed to poison ivy or if he has a little bit. All that to say, taking nettles capsules or drinking Nettle tea (at least a quart or two over a day) may help a lot, too and it is very safe.

Hope you find relief soon!

Replied by Jay
Orlando, Fl
06/11/2013
5 out of 5 stars

Externally applied DMSO will cure your rash.


Posted by Mildred (Combs, Arkansas) on 07/16/2007
5 out of 5 stars

I had poison ivy from head to toe, and had given up that I would have to go to the doctor for shots, when my cousin picked me some jewel weed and told me to try it. I made a tea from this and drank 1/2 cup, with a half spoon of sugar and it dried it up immediately. I later found an old home remedy book that said to break the stem of jewel weed and rub it on. I had it too severely to do that. I have given jewel weed tea to 3 of my grandchildren with no ill effects.


Posted by Barb (Canada) on 03/22/2007
5 out of 5 stars

At the very first sign of poison ivy, I head for the nearest milk weed plant,{Asclepias speciosa}, (I live in zone 3), and snap off a few stems and apply the milky latex like substance to the poison ivy. I do this twice daily for about 2 days. It does not have to be re-applied unless it is washed off. If caught early enough, this will stop it in its tracks. This is an old Indian remedy.


Posted by Garrett (Tenn) on 05/16/2006
5 out of 5 stars

I read a while back that a plant called jewel weed has a chemical in it that goes to the same site that the oil ( the thing that gives you the outbreak) in poison ivy does and blocks it temporarily. How you apply it is you just rub the juice from the stem on the area that you know you will come in contact with the accursed plant and it will prevent it. The plant tends to get pretty big and has these red/orange flowers the stem is a almost translucent green and is kinda red at the base. wish you luck with it.


L-lysine, Vitamin C, Aspirin  

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Posted by Mama To Many Donate
(Tennessee, Usa) on 11/09/2015
5 out of 5 stars

Well, I am back again with another "yea" for something else that works for poison ivy - this one was an accidental discovery.

One of my adults sons had a cold. I was giving him the following, twice a day:

2 capsules (total 800mg) L-lysine

2 tablets (700mg) aspirin

1 tablet (1000 mg) Vitamin C

After a few days he told me - "Whatever you were giving me for my cold really helped my poison ivy. I had some on my fingers and it was getting bad, but now it is almost dried up." (I didn't even know he had poison ivy! )

I recalled that L-lysine is sometimes used for cold sores. Something about it must be helpful when skin needs healing. Vitamin C is also helpful for skin issues. I don't know if the aspirin had any benefit at all to the poison ivy, but didn't want to neglect it, in case it did.

~Mama to Many~


Lemon Joy  

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Posted by Gail Mathena (Winston Salem, North Carolina) on 09/07/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Preventing poison ivy breakouts -- Lemon Joy put on all exposed areas, yes even around the eyes will keep you from breaking out. My husband is very allergic, and I attempt to keep it out of the yard, and off the trees. Every year, no matter how many precautions I took, I would break out, especially on my face. Last year I used Lemon joy to dry it up. This year I applied Lemon Joy like a lotion and went at it. After exposing myself for hours and clearing the nasty vines out, I showered. It usually takes 2 days for the breakouts to occur, but none did. My sister, who is highly allergic, swears by it but usually showers with Lemon joy after exposure. I decided to attempted a preventative alternative, because I couldn't get to the shower quick enough.


Lye Soap  

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Posted by Sandy (Langley, OK) on 10/19/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Lye Soap

In the early 60's my daughter who was about 7 got poison ivy. I took her to the doctor. Got shot and instructions. It got worse, between her toes, fingers, everywhere!! A little old lady in Nebraska told me to get some P&G Soap. You could buy it then. People used it for washing clothes. Bought some and it cleared up her poison ivy. They no longer market it, so when I find it at a flea market or craft shop I buy lots and give as gifts. Please believe me, this really works. Keep it in the bath or shower and see how it really destroys the oil that comes from the blisters.


Mama's Herbal Tea  

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Posted by Mama To Many Donate
(Tennessee) on 06/01/2015
5 out of 5 stars

Several in my family have been dealing with poison ivy in the last couple of weeks. We have used many natural remedies for poison ivy over the years with success. An herbal salve, oatmeal, apple cider vinegar, and many other things! But some of my children balk at salve, don't like the smell of vinegar...they want the least intrusive remedy. So I made a tea that I put into a spray bottle and kept in the fridge. They could pull it out and spray their poison ivy whenever it was bothering them. This was especially nice for my daughter, who had it around her eyes. She would spray them often for relief and the tea spray was completely safe when it got into her eyes. My son had poison ivy on his arms and legs. His arms healed faster because he sprayed them much more often since he wore jeans during the day and wasn't bothering spraying his legs.

For the child who had poison ivy all over his arms and legs, I also gave him several tea baths. I would make a gallon of strong herbal tea and add it to his bathwater. He would soak for about 30 minutes a couple of times a day. (This was not convenient to him but he was pretty miserable and therefore willing. In fact, in spite of diligent home treatment internally and externally, he ended up needing prednisone. We continued the spray even when he was on prednisone.)

Recipe for Herbal Spray for Poison Ivy

  • 1 Tablespoon dry comfrey leaves
  • 1 Tablespoon dry plantain leaves
  • 1 cup boiling water

Put dry leaves into a mason jar. Add boiling water. Let steep for 30 minutes. Strain leaves out of tea. Store in a spray bottle in the refrigerator. Make a fresh batch of tea each day.

Recipe for Herbal Tea Bath for Poison Ivy

  • 1/2 cup dry comfrey leaves
  • 1/2 cup dry plantain leaves
  • 1 gallon boiling water

Bring 1 gallon of water to boil. Remove from heat. Add dry leaves. Cover. Steep 30 minutes to 2 hours. Strain out leaves. Add to a tub of water. If water is very hot, be careful not to let very hot water hit the skin of the child in the tub, if he is in there already. :)

One morning my three year old woke up and said, "I want a comfrey bath!!! " He had poison ivy and had seen his brother have many "comfrey baths." He wasn't feeling too patient, so I put him in the tub with warm water and a cup of baking soda (which I find helpful for itching and nearly everything! ) I put 1/2 cup comfrey leaves into an old sock and tied it off, like a giant tea bag. I put it into his bath water (since I didn't really have time to make the bath tea on the stove because he wanted his bath NOW.) Periodically I would squeeze the sock to release the comfrey tea. By the end of his bath, the water was tea colored! It worked quite well. And he felt a good bit better and was in a much better mood.

~Mama to Many~



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