Organic Gardening Tips for Better Health!

Slugs and Snails

3 User Reviews
5 star (3) 
  100%


Posted by Staff (Earth Clinic) on 09/30/2012

You want to grow a nice organic garden full of pesticide-free goodness, but the snails and slugs are always claiming the first bites on everything! What's to do? From the shear number of folk remedies available to combat them, you can easily see what a problem snails and slugs can be in the garden. Their aesthetic failings aside, these munchers can ravage a plant's leaves in no time at all. Prevention goes a long way. First remove the clutter from your garden, including decorative elements that give these guys shelter. Morning watering allows the soil to dry before night-feasting snails can come out to enjoy the moist environment. Rough mulches can deter these pests as well. Then give some of those folk remedies a try, but remember that what works in one place might not be right for another set of pests and conditions. Try, try again!

Replied by Timh
(Louisville, Ky, Usa)
10/01/2012
2083 posts

A good size slug will make a catch for a fish like Bass or Catfish. Be careful to not eat fish from large rivers and reservoirs in densely populated, dense agricultural or industrial areas as the fish could contain high levels of pollutants and heavy metals. Always wash hands after handling snails as they are the primary source of the Liver Fluke.


Slugs and Snails
Posted by Susan (USA) on 04/12/2009
5 out of 5 stars

Alan from Boulder, CO writes: "No one here has mentioned the beer trap yet, so I figured I might as well post it. It works for me out here in Boulder, but I guess it's not foolproof. Anyhow, the idea is that the slugs and snails are attracted to the yeast and sugar in the beer, but the alcohol kills them. Or dries them out. Here's my set up: a Frisbee turned upside down and filled with about two centimeters of cheap beer. I push the Frisbee down into the soil a bit, so that it's easy enough to crawl into. Whatever container you like, it should be shallow and fairly smooth. Something the slugs or snails won't mind climbing on. I leave a can of beer open in the refrigerator when I'm trying to kill them off, because you want the carbonation to be out of it. Bugs don't like bubbles, I guess. Toss the beer and the trapped slugs out every morning, then refill the tray with beer every evening until the problem goes away. It's a home remedy, for sure.

Replied by Susan
(USA)
04/25/2009
5 out of 5 stars

Meg from Santa Clarita, CA replies: "My mother used the beer trap with great success!


Slugs and Snails
Posted by Susan (USA) on 03/23/2009
5 out of 5 stars

Michelle from Miami, FL writes: "After trying everything under the sun to deal with snails in my flower garden, on a friend's recommendation I tried used coffee grounds (not fresh). I sprinkle the grounds around the base of the plants that the snails love and voila, no more holes in my plants! They simply don't like the smell and move on. I like this much better than drowning the poor creatures in a can of beer or watching them melt with salt.


Slugs and Snails
Posted by Susan (USA) on 03/11/2009

T from Maryland, USA writes: "I've been 'stockpiling' egg shells for a few months now in anticipation of my new veggie garden. Rinse the shells well and air dry them, then put them in a large plastic bag, crush them up a bit, and store in the freezer. Add some to the soil for nutrients, and sprinkle some around plants as they come up to deter slugs.


Slugs and Snails
Posted by Susan (USA) on 03/09/2009

Dj from Pdx, Or writes: "Slug and Snail - Radishes, dorky but true: I have had good luck with radishes. Okay I sacrifice virgin radishes to the slug and snail gods/esses. Apparently the slugs and snails in my area are partial to radishes and will munch on those plants before they munch on my green beans, corn and cucumbers. I have a small garden so I do not know if the radishes are more attractive than say brussel sprouts. I just let the radishes grow and never pull them and the slugs seem to be happy with the arrangement. I am going to try the radishes in one of my flower beds next.


Tabasco Peppers

Posted by Mama To Many (Tennessee) on 05/22/2017

We are a little late because we have been out of town, but I finally got plants put into my garden. I don't plant a ton, just enough to have fresh basil, tomatoes, cucumbers, cilantro and peppers for the summer.

My little guy came out to help me plant. Digging in the dirt is fun! Here is a picture of him planting a Tabasco pepper plant. If you can find a Tabasco pepper plant, I would encourage you to plant one. It is the most beautiful plant in the garden when the peppers come in. They are small and upturned and look like Christmas tree lights!

Then you make Pepper Sauce. Super easy. You just put the peppers into a jar and cover with white vinegar. In two weeks you have hot pepper sauce. Not too hot. You are basically making a tincture with vinegar instead of alcohol. And this is so pretty sitting on your table.

By the way Mmsg - my son says we don't have any wild oats growing near us here like we did when we lived in Kentucky!

And Robert Henry, what is the best way to keep down the weeds? I have heard of putting paper bags around the base of the plants to keep down weeds, but should I be concerned about chemicals in the paper? Thanks!

~Mama to Many~

Replied by Mmsg
(Somewhere, Europe)
05/23/2017

Ha MtM! Just today I planted some oat groats from the health food store!! I had planted them last week, but the birds dug up every last one and ate them!! So for now I have them in a planter, covered.

Do you know if "oat groat tea" (is there even such a thing??! ) will give the bone benefits that oatstraw tea does?

Replied by Robert Henry
(Ten Mile , Tn)
05/23/2017

MAMA,,,,,,,,, you doing good and I can't add a whole lot to your program. I too, am planting tabasco pepper plants that a friend who gave us the old peppers. Just wish we still had some snot nose kids at home to help in the garden like you do.

Whatever shuts out the sun will keep down weeds. We use woven mesh, but add last years leaves to augment. As you know you don't save money by growing a garden. You just eat healthier and that the reason EC exists.

ATS ====ORH========

Replied by Robert Henry
(Ten Mile , Tn)
05/23/2017

MAMA,,,,,,,, reread your post and if you want really hot pepper sauce then add olive oil. I learned that trick from my South Louisiana Cujun friends when I worked down there in the '60's. The oil pulls out the heat from the peppers.

====ORH===

Replied by Robert Henry
(Ten Mile, Tn)
05/24/2017

MAMA,,,,,,,,, what you know... that some folk don't, is that water is not water. I have an irrigation system from a spring, but that does not have the H2O2 that rain water does. It is raining cats and dogs here in East Tenn and my garden plants are reaching for the sky. It is bettern fertilizer. Plants love H2O2.

How does rain obtain H2O2? The rain passes through the Ozone layer and picks up an extra Oxygen atom. H2O2 is an unstable compound and will soon loose the extra oxygen atom with time . That is the reason you buy it in a dark container. Light, time, and heat kill H2O2. Thus:

2H2O2----2H2O + O2

So... after awhile H2O2 turns to water and oxygen. If you pour it on a open wound and it does not fizz, then pour it out. It is no longer H2O2. It is just water.

Mama, I'll give you $3.50 for that little tow headed boy in your photo. He is precious.

====ORH=======

Replied by Mama To Many
(Tn)
05/24/2017

Dear Robert Henry,

Well, I didn't know the the difference in water that you have shared. I really appreciate the chemistry lesson!
Would something like this be the reason that farmers would plow snow into the ground?

We have had a lot of rain, too. I have a new appreciation for it.

Glad you like my little guy. I am pretty fond of him myself. He keeps me on my toes and laughing all the way.

~Mama to Many~

Replied by Mama To Many
(Tn)
05/25/2017

Dear Mmsg,

Regarding oats versus the oatstraw part of the plant- my herb books mostly discuss them interchangeably. I think their nutrient content is similar. This discussion about oats at Mountain Rose Herbs would indicate that the oatstraw tea tends to heal more over time. Both are excellent for the nervous system. Both have calcium and magnesium, making them good for the bones. I love oats and oatstraw as a healing food. Another great way to let your food be your medicine!

I have not heard of using the oats as a tea but don't see why you couldn't. It would likely be tastier than oatstraw tea, which kind of tastes like grass tea, to me. (Hmmm...but I have never actually consumed grass tea....)

https://www.mountainroseherbs.com/products/oatstraw/profile

~Mama to Many~

Replied by Mmsg
(Somewhere, Europe)
06/01/2017

MtM, around here there are tons of a plant that looks like oatstraw pictures on Google, but they have a sliver of an excuse for a seed. So I dunno if they are wild oats at all. So I planted oat groats (seeds) in a flowerpot....but they didn't grow! Makes me wonder if they are fit for human consumption. And they don't sell oatstraw for tea in health food stores here. And, I've cut down on eating grains. So I'm wondering how to get the benefits of oats. Any ideas?

Replied by Mama To Many
(Tn)
06/03/2017

Dear Mmsg,

Amazon, iherb or Mountain Rose Herbs may ship internationally. I think Fronteir has oatstraw in bulk.

I am not sure how the wild oats plant looks when it is grown.

If oatstraw ends up not being a reasonable option might nettle be available? It is another very nutritive herb. 😀🌱

~Mama to Many~


The Soil Association (UK)

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by Michael (New Zealand) on 08/04/2021
5 out of 5 stars

Hi there again you jolly posters!

Here is a follow up to my ranting and raving from a little earlier to-day.

This "Soil Association" Site has been around in the UK for long enough (1946) to have a track record to be appreciated for what it achieves. My famous Aunt liked it a lot, which has to be an enviable endorsement! Prince Charles possibly approves also.

You could do a lot worse than this one if you seriously wish to get started on your "Growing Journey".

At least their hemisphere is the same as your one and you don't have to convert Januaries to Julys etc like we do down here !!!

Scroll down to their "Top Tips for Growing at Home" for a nice succinct summary (with no padding and dross).

https://www.soilassociation.org/who-we-are/

Go/grow well.

Cheers from Down Under


Tomato Tips

2 User Reviews
5 star (2) 
  100%


Posted by Susan (USA) on 04/15/2009
5 out of 5 stars

Karl ([email protected]) from St. Louis, Missouri writes: "Pepper and tomatoes (all) plants need to be "hardened off" prior to planting in the garden. Harden off by taking the plants outside during the day. Make sure to put them in the shade. Return them inside at night, usually 3-4 days of hardening off is sufficient. Tomato and peppers usually are planted outside in the garden around the second week of may depending upon your planting zone.


Tomato Tips
Posted by Susan (USA) on 04/15/2009
5 out of 5 stars

DPK from Hoosick Falls, NY writes: "My mother has always sworn by egg shells crumbled up a bit and scattered beneath tomato plants. She says they deter insects and provide nutrients needed by tomatoes in particular. We never worried about cleaning the egg shells up before tossing them out there, but some people think it a good idea, to keep the odor down.

Replied by Susan
(USA)
04/15/2009

Matt from Burlington, VT replies: "Egg shells are also good for birds' digestion. In the winter when it's hard for birds to find grit or tiny pebbles to break down seeds, I crush dried egg shells and leave them near my bird feeders. They gobble it right up. Coarse sand also does the same trick, but I've always used egg shells.


Tomato Tips
Posted by Susan (USA) on 04/15/2009

Jane from Sussex, England writes: "When I first started gardening it was with a great boom! I read up on everything I could find at the time, (this was 40 years ago, before the days of the internet) and proceeded to scout around to see what I could find with regard to improving the soil at our new, little house in Greenwich, Connecticut. Great success story! Having been told that it was a hundred percent safe to use, I was given sludge (aka treated sewage) by the town, which was dumped at a really good distance away from the house, and also I was given a load of seaweed from the beach. The latter is also something that I believe would be preferable to keep at a distance while it rots. Eventually I carried barrowloads of my collection to where I wanted to plant tomatoes. Added all sorts of other natural items, with great and unprofessional enthusiasm! The end result was spectacular, enormously tall plants full of great tomatoes, and a bonus in the shape of a beautiful snake curled round the base of one of the plants. I vaguely remember it was called a bull snake, quite harmless. This is the story of someone attempting their first garden. Somehow I think that it was my best and most successful one.


Tomato Tips
Posted by Susan (USA) on 04/15/2009

Frank from Tulsa, OK writes: "I read a few years back in an organic gardening book to add 1 tablespoon of epsom salts to a gallon of water every time you water your tomatoes. I tried it last summer and my tomatoes grew like gangbusters. You do want to do a soil test before you add epsom salts first because you can harm your plants if you already have high levels of magnesium in the soil. Oh, one more thing --tomatoes don't like getting their leaves wet, so I always water from the bottom.


Vitamin K Vegetables

Posted by Robert Henry (Ten Mile, Tn) on 08/30/2018

HI U GOOD FOLKS DOIN,,,,,,,,,,,,, SJS, as all know, but I came upon a radish that grows 2' long and will break up your hard pan and improve your garden. It is from Japan and called a Daikon radish and is the latest rage to improve your garden. I planted my entire fall garden in them. Folks know to use a subsoiler behind a tractor to do this, but why not let nature do it for you? Tomorrow I will plant them where I will plant my melons next spring. We are still eating watermelons after using worm castings this year under my plants. This trick should make our yield even better next year.

Most know that there is a clay hard pan below the topsoil that plant roots cannot penetrate. If you break up this hard pan then your plant roots can go deeper and live longer in drought times. I thought I would be smart at 65, then 75 and maybe will make that goal at 85. Anyways, I can use this knowledge in my next life, if I don't come back as a goat.

Our fall garden consists of lettuce, radish, onions, garlic, beets, kale, rudabeggers, purple top turnips, mustard greens and collards. All loaded with Vitamin K which takes calcium out of your blood and deposits it into your bones, where it should be. Your cardiologist tells you that it is cholesterol that plugs your blood vessels up. Shame on him. It is calcium in your blood that plugs you up.

Finishing up a 'nother 30 round of EDTA CHELATIONS to clean my vessels out. I have now done over 100 chelations in the last 14 years. And no, it is not covered by insurance. Too cheap and too effective. MD's want you coming back add infinitum, which means forever.

Yo Redneck buddy............. ====ORH====

Replied by Robert Henry
(Ten Mile, Tn)
08/31/2018

HI U GOOD FOLKS DOIN,,,,,,,, might have messed up in my last post ......cause you can clean out your blood vessels with 30 treatments and that will cost you $3000 out of pocket. On the other hand, a 4 vessel bypass will cost someone about $200,000 and is just a temporary fix.

Let me tell you a secret. Go to your doctor and tell him you are having head pains and think your Carotid Arteries are the problem. Get the test done and that pluggage will tell you what is going on around your heart. If your test tells you are over 50% plugged in the neck then find you an Integrative Doctor that does EDTA Chelation and do 30 treatments and get retested. Otherwise, you are ripe for a heart attack.

What this tells you is that you are not eating right. So change that. That is the reason that a heart by-pass operation is only a temporary thing. If you don't change your eating, then you will go through this from now on. I eat best I can, but know that is not the whole picture, but Chelation is the for-giver. A heart by-pass is playing Russian roulette. You are pissen in the wind.

I have spent about 14 years going down this road and talked to some 200 people who had bypass after bypass until they found Chelation. Even then, you have to eat right or you back in deep DoDo.

I am a health preacher and have few converts. Most will only listen to their MD and that is the tragedy .

ATS ====ORH====


Volcanic Ash and Epsom Salt

1 User Review
5 star (1) 
  100%


Posted by ORH (TEN MILE, TN) on 05/28/2021
5 out of 5 stars

HI U OLE PATOOTS DOIN, ORH here, and think my 15 year old footballer is a keeper. He is in honors math and is a kid that I can mold into a savvy man. He works with my tractor driver to get our plants transplanted. I dig the holes and he puts the volcanic ash and Epsom salts in the hole. Phyllis then puts the plants in. He dug out my worm bed today and put the castings along my raised bed plants. He could not believe how much you have to pay for worm castings when you can get them for free. When he digs out weeds then they go into a bucket and then to the worm bed. This way we don't lose the rich dirt and the worms turn the weeds into fertilizer.

Today he also learned why a specific elm tree is called Ironwood. The tree has the appearance of the arm of a muscled man. Since he lifts weights, he understood that. He is coming around and it makes me proud to be a part of his education. At my stage of life, I need him more than he needs me. It is a win-win situation.

====ORH====


Weeds

Posted by Robert Henry (Ten Mile, Tn Usa) on 03/17/2012

HI YA'LL DOIN... Know this is not a gardening site but most know that I've been using numerous yearly detox's to get out what garbage I accumulate each year. I'm a gardner and I use pre-emergence herbicides. I just learned from the Texas folks that have the largest onion farm in the U. S. How they prevent grass with a corn by-product which is natural and not a toxin. Thought some on this site might like to know that and live a healther life.

When corn is processed into various things, a by-product called corn gluten remains. This is then fed to cattle and such. What has been recently learned that when this pellet is ground into a meal and spread on soil it will prevent weed seeds from germinating. Hey, but it will also prevent any seed from sprouting so you have to use it on transplants or wait until your veggie or flower seeds are up out of the ground.

This is what I'm doing this year in my garden and hope you can use this imformation for your health. This was news to me, but all know.... I's smart, jus slow.

=======ROBERT HENRY=========

Replied by Carly
(Seattle, Wa - Usa)
10/01/2012

Hi Robert Henry....That sounds like it was made from the "Round-up ready" corn if it keeps things like grasses and weeds from growing.... if so, I wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole! Just a thought.


Wire Mesh to Protect Plants

Posted by Susan (USA) on 05/07/2009

Rose from Santa Cruz, California writes: "I laid a 1/2" wire mesh before I created my raised vegetable garden beds and haven't seen any gophers so far this year.

Replied by Susan
(USA)
05/25/2009

Sandy from Carmel Valley, USA replies: "The wire mesh worked for me for several years but I was warned the mesh won't last forever and this spring I've seen several gophers back in the garden



1 2