Fleas
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Natural Flea Control

| Modified on Aug 11, 2021

Lavender Oil
Posted by Shirlena (Oakland, MO) on 02/27/2007
5 out of 5 stars

Using Lavender essential oil does get rid of fleas on the dogs just like others have said. It will also keep them from getting fleas in the first place. If they do come in contact with them outside, they won't stay on them long.

Here's what I do. I make an all-purpose cleaner for most of my house cleaning that keeps all bugs out. Here's the recipe:

1-cup alcohol
1-cup distilled water
5 drops lavender essential oil
5 drops peppermint oil

Mix in a 24 to 32 oz. Spray bottle. Shake to mix then spray on and wipe with soft cloth, if needed, use a different dry cloth to buff. Use on just about anything and most surfaces.

My dogs, since they were puppies have slept in a wire cage each. They go to bed at night at the same time and they stay in their home cages while I run errands. They feel safe and secure there. I clean the wire cages with this mix and there have been no bugs on or in the cages. We've not had one bug of any kind (not even spiders) in our house since I started using this mix.Bugs of all kinds hate lavender. This recipe can be altered without any problems. You may use only lavender oil and omit the peppermint oil. You may use different amounts of any of the ingredients and it will still work fine. Also by using this mix, everything will be sparkling clean.

Thanks for a great site.


Borax
Posted by Brett (Hawaii) on 06/11/2021
5 out of 5 stars

Once get stationed in an old house while on a job in a city, it was a duplex with a door to other side. The neighbors had used this nasty old side for their dog's house. I got eaten alive by fleas the first night, woke with blood all over my chest and went right to work cleaning then spread borax over everything the fleas might be in and on all the floors in the place. No more fleas, the next morning: NO BITES.


Garlic
Posted by Ari (Willemstad, Curacao, Caribbean) on 05/16/2013
5 out of 5 stars

Hi there, we have 3 rescued dogs and they are all on 1 heaped teaspoon of minced garlic a day. I buy the jars. Garlic in olive oil. Fresh garlic is better but it is more work! They never have fleas. The vet didn't believe they are not on frontline or something like it, until I told him about the garlic. Apperently the garlic gives off an enzyme the fleas don't like. Garlic is healthy anyway. Give it a go.

Garlic
Posted by Mark (Exeter, United Kingdom) on 11/09/2015 12 posts
5 out of 5 stars

Found on Earth Clinic's garlic for dogs page:

THE DOCTOR OF NATURAL PET CARE ND, Ph.D. AKA ........'THE EXPERT'

Garlic, the Facts,

by Lisa S. Newman, ND, Ph.D.

Since 1982, Dr. Newman has been a world renowned pioneer in the field of natural pet care. The author of nine books."

"When it comes to your pet's health, do you want to follow facts or fears? Unfortunately, garlic has come under attack. This is primarily as a result of garlic's close cousin onion's reputation for triggering hemolytic or "Heinz factor" anemia (where circulating red blood cells burst) through its high concentration of thiosulphate. With onions, a single generous serving can cause this reaction. Garlic simply DOES NOT CONTAIN THE SAME CONCENTRATION of this compound! In fact, it is barely traceable and readily excreted (not stored in the body).

Despite this fact, garlic is falling victim to mass hysteria spread through the internet. Yes, there are 51,174 sites devoted to warning about the "toxicity" of garlic, this hysteria has even prompted the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center to place a warning on garlic although there is little scientific data to back this claim other than the fact that thiosulphate is also found in garlic. Yet, there are also over 400,000 sites still proclaiming its benefits, many of them from reputable holistic veterinarians who have widely used garlic in their practice for many years! How can an herb suddenly turn so bad?!

There is no doubt that onion, due to its concentration of thiosulphate, will cause Heinz factor anemia. In addition, as stated by Wendy Wallner, DVM, "Onions are only one of the substances which can cause Heinz body anemia. Other substances such as Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and benzocaine-containing topical preparations can also cause Heinz body anemia in the dog." The latter probably accounts for many cases as it is prevalent in creams often recommended for allergy-suffering pets due to its ability to numb the itch. It is absorbed through the skin and builds up in the blood stream. This other substance is likely to have been involved in cases where garlic was suspect.

For centuries, as long as humans have been using herbs, garlic has been a primary remedy turned to in a majority of cases. For as long as people have been using garlic, they have also been feeding it to their animal companions. Its properties have proven far reaching, easy on the body and safe to use. In the past fifty years, during the rebirth of holistic medicine in the United States, garlic has been in the forefront. Every text that I have researched on herbal health which mentions pet care has recommended it, especially for its incredible anti-parasitic and anti-septic properties. In my own experience, garlic has also benefited pets with cancer, diabetes, liver, heart and kidney disease, uncontrollable staph infections and a host of other conditions, as well as been a staple in my recommended preventative protocols. It has been widely used by hundreds of thousands of pet owners with no reported negative side-effects - except its effect on their animal's breath - until now.

This is the point;

garlic has suddenly become a "suspect, " not proven the culprit.

Do not let mass hysteria determine a holistic care program for your dog or cat. Follow hundreds of years of "proven use" rather than recent "suspicions" in regards to this miracle herb, as garlic is known to be. As with anything, do use garlic in reasonable doses, and do know that you can trust history over hysteria. ------


Borax
Posted by A. O'brien (Arkansas ) on 07/15/2016

Yes! Borax kills flea eggs! You could also purchase Boric Acid, which is in Borax, since this is what kills the flea eggs! Being that it does NOT kill ADULT fleas, did you know you can combine ordinary table salt, which kills ADULTS but NOT EGGS, with Boric Acid to eliminate all life cycles at once?! It's the truth, I tell ya!!

HOWEVER----->Many pet lovers opt in favor of sprinkling Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth on their carpets since it's an effective natural remedy and safe for all furry critters- even if they consume it (it's also a natural de-wormer). Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth physically destroys the fleas exoskeleton from the outside, causing the little pest to dehydrate. AND because it works on this physical level, they will never build immunity (Yesss!! ).

BONUS: Did you know F.G.D.E. not only annihilates fleas... it efficiently 'snipers' any would-be invaders, like: Ants, Roaches, Bed-bugs, Mites, Ticks, Crickets, Lice...actually THIS AMAZING BAG OF POWDER KILL ANY BUG IN THE ENTIRE WORLD WITH AN EXOSKELETON!!!

ARE YOU FEELING MY EXCITEMENT PEOPLE?!? IT'S AN ENTIRE BAG OF "AWESOMENESS" and its uses are endless!!

How are these flea control companies even staying in business? I will NEVER study another 'flea control' box label to assess my pets health risks after use. It's just not worth it, and my pets agree.----->

"Hey...we totally agree." -the Pets

What...of course they wrote that ;)


Aloe Vera
Posted by Karmala (Templeton, California) on 01/10/2013
5 out of 5 stars

First off let me say that Earth Clinic is my "go to" site for getting informaion and answers and help. It is my starting point on whatever questions I might have. - I start here, google what I've found, and end up right back here again. This is an amazing community of people helping people.

I have recently had a bout of fleas on my poor dogs. There were only a few so I didn't know what it was for a couple of weeks. I kept checking them for fleas or mites, but never saw anything. They were miserable, would welt up, then get better. Then the cycle started all over again. After discovering the fleas, I did a test. In small, separate containers I put, hydrogen peroxide, aloe vera juice, white vinegar, and apple cider vinegar. I deposited a few fleas in each container. Surprisingly, they lasted less than 5 seconds in the aloe vera juice! The others took considerably longer... They swam in the white vinegar for about 20 minutes, in the ACV for about 5 minutes, and in the hydrogen peroxide for about 5 minutes. I had a 1 gallon container of organic 100% aloe vera juice so gave both boys a sponge bath in it... Really soaked them down. The welts have diminished quite a bit and they are finally resting comfortably.

Garlic
Posted by Angela (Maple Falls, Wa) on 12/29/2009
5 out of 5 stars

Natural Flea Treatment

Last summer we had an extreme flea problem, all of our animals were infested ! We are always more inclined to use a natural remedy instead of chemicals, as we have a special needs child.

First we started adding a small amount of minced garlic to the pets food (you can also use aged kyolic garlic found in health food stores )

Second, we washed all bedding, and sprayed furniture with a mix of 8oz water with 20 drops each of lavender/tea tree oils.

Lastly, we bathed the animals and sprayed them down with citrus water :

RECIPE : In a large bowl of boiled water , add 2 quartered lemons and 2 quartered limes , let sit covered overnight . Strain liquid into spray bottle and use to spray pets coat( avoiding the face and other sensitive areas) bonus ~ They smell great LOL. I store any left over in the fridge .

Another great idea is to sprinkle carpets with 20 mule team borax at night before bed, then vacuum in the morning . We no longer have a flea problem :0)


Garlic
Posted by Mark (Exeter, United Kingdom) on 11/15/2015 12 posts
1 out of 5 stars

@Ann Marie (Indianapolis, Indiana USA)

Hi it appears that the myth of garlic applies to cats as well as dogs.

I used to make garlic water and then store it in a 500ml glass bottle refridgerated. For my cat I was pulled up approx 0.2ml of garlic water and squirt and mix into his food. No adverse reactions, but remember having to start at a low dose and build up a little ech day. I also used to boil fresh parsley for 3 mins the strain and bottle that water using a teaspoonof that in food, as parsley would help cleanse the kidneys (Dr Hulda Clark).

Not only is garlic good for fleas but I use it successfully on myself and my dog (bitch) for tooth abcess, we both were in a bad way with a leak rendering us from 'normal' to intoxicated within seconds by posion from the tooth seeping out the tooth & down thraot, using garlic, within 24hrs I was 90% better with the next day normal again, a little longer for pugsley as I had a much bigger dosage, both sorted and with out the liver bashing and flora gut masssacre we would have endured taking 'anti-biotics', a wonderful anti-biotic for family, children and 4 legged friends.

All the nay sayers who post here have read a scare story or 2 written by profit making businesses, selling synthetic copies of organic meds, whose profits will suffer when / if garlics healing potential is whole heartedly acknowledged.

Don't you think the holistic vets and also the pet lovers who use and praise garlic hold more weight than a written statement thats regurgitated by a worry wort?? (intentions may be good but really its holding back the truth based on shoddy research quite frankly).

One more thing, Vets have access to extremely cheap medications that are just as good as the top shelf expensive meds.

Some vets will offer euthenasia if 'bills' cant be paid for due to greedy vaccine, meds extortion fees. The vaccine and pharma corps forbid them from offering the affordable meds to lower income pet homes. If they start to dish out cheaper alternatives then EVERYONE will want cheaper therefore massive profit drops!! Also a vet practice will pay little over £1 per vile of vaccine (USA approx $0.80), so a £70 injection is not only toxic un-needed abuse to your pet but also pure profit for vets. Over half a vets annual income is vaccine related-hence the yearly illegal boosters (dont even accept the 3 yearly vaccine) puppy jabs for dogs and cats WILL LAST THEM THEIR LIFETIME!! Vaccine toxicity will show its self 3 months after the injection- which removes the vaccines from accusation coz 3 months is long time but im sure lots of you will be able to marry current illnesses to a start point 3 monts after a vaccine injection.

please see .....http://www.petwelfarealliance.org/

scientific eveidence and the fight to stop vaccine abuse.

also

http://www.canine-health-concern.org.uk/AboutCHC.html

Thanks, Mark


Essential Oils
Posted by Laura (Cambridge, Ontario, Canada) on 12/06/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Skin Allergy Remedies for Pets
Lavender Essential Oil Spray.

This works so well my dogs actually ask for it! I just use about a 1/2 oz of pure lavender essential oil in a spray bottle filled the rest of the way up with water. In the summer, my bichon and lab both get 'hot spots' on their paws and seem to become a little obsessive about chewing on them, especially at night. When it gets to be too much they will walk over to my night table and whine until I open it and give them a squirt or 2 of this mixture and they calm down, stop itching and go to sleep. Lavender is a natural bug repellant too, and is also great as an antihistamine. There have even been times when my lab will go get the bottle and bring it to me... can you believe it!

Salt
Posted by Nikki (Fl) on 06/14/2021
5 out of 5 stars

Gounded up salt like popcorn salt. The salt is so fine that the flea's legs pick it up and it drys them out


Salt
Posted by Cindy (Illinois, USA) on 05/10/2021 343 posts
5 out of 5 stars

Salt. Cheapo, salt in the round box. Iodized, not iodized, it doesn't matter what kind. Sprinkle on carpet and in corners. I didn't even have to de-flea the dogs who had brought home fleas from the groomer. Always a risk with groomers who offer walk-in nail clipping because those dogs don't get a bath BUT it's not a problem PLUS it's super handy to be able to just walk in and get their nails clipped when, with a 50 cent box of salt, it's never an issue!


Borax
Posted by Barbara (Troy, Al) on 04/19/2016
5 out of 5 stars

Borax kills fleas. Just powder furniture and carpets and floors. Let it set the longer the better. I waited one week before vacuuming.


Amethyst
Posted by Theresa (Mpls., Mn) on 07/25/2014

I spoke with a witchy healer I know and she said the same; recharge the stones. It may be that the cases where the stones did not work at all simply needed to be charged before use!


Garlic
Posted by Patrick Browning (Gulf Breeze Florida, Florida) on 06/06/2012
5 out of 5 stars

Garlic for fleas:

I've breed dogs for over 20 years large, and small bread dogs. And other then bad breath me and my wife noticed that the fleas are simply gone. The chemicals were getting expensive and I didnt really feel they were really safe. I mean come on, a chemical you apply once a month. I live in florida where there is a lot of insects, period. All I can say is we see the proof with no ill side effects.

I use minced garlic that I bought at sam's club.

Salt
Posted by Crystal At (Ny) on 10/31/2011
5 out of 5 stars

Grind salt in a blender or food processor until its a powder and sprinkle everywhere even on pets. You will see the fleas jump up and then die! Wonderful, fast & cheap! Good luck. I just sprinkled my whole apt. I have 4 month old twins & a 7 yr old and we tried advantage, vacuuming & knockout. When I found out salt worked I had to try it and I watched those blood suckers die lol. They have bitten me all over my body and have started biting my 7 yr old. I was desperate and frustrated. I was about to give up my cat. I wish u the best!


Salt
Posted by Erin (Largo, Fl) on 09/16/2010
5 out of 5 stars

I've had a bad flea problem for about a week and tried everything but nothing worked. As a last resort I tried salt. Instead of sprinkling it on the carpets I mixed table salt and hot water in a spray bottle. I sprayed all the carpets, furniture and dog bedding. It worked great, as the water dried it left an even coat of salt on the carpets, was easy to spray under beds and couch and was much less messy then sprinkling a layer of powdered salt over everything. Within an hour I noticed that there was a drastic decrease in the number of fleas and it took less than 10 minutes to spray the entire apartment.

Dish Soap
Posted by Carol (Big Spring, Tx) on 09/08/2009
5 out of 5 stars

After finding and reading your web site I found the dish soap worked but I hesitate to use it too often. The night light under a pan of soapy water worked for inside the house. The flea comb has been wonderful. He likes the attention and will readily let me comb him.(Male Cat) Now I dip the comb in 7 dust He hated the dust before but he doesn't mind the comb dipped in it. I pick the fleas off the comb and put them into soapy water. They drown. The OVER THE COUNTER flea applications on the back of the neck did not work.

Salt
Posted by Sandra (Pasadena, CA) on 05/08/2007
5 out of 5 stars

Last year we had a really bad outbreak of fleas in our house. My 2 year old kept getting bites all over her body and my husband and I too. I didn't want to use all the toxic powders or even boric acid since she has asthma. I got desperate and bought 10 cans of salt from the store and sprinkled it all over the house (mainly the carpet). Let it sit for 4 days and then vaccumed with a vaccum that has excellent sucction and a HEPA filter. THE FLEAS WERE GONE!!!!!. I guess the salt dehydrates them and kills the eggs as well. IF you live in a humid climate don't leave the salt in the carpet too long as it retains water. Wash all the linens and couch cushions etc....repeat the vaccum every day for 3-4 days to get all the salt out.


Multiple Remedies
Posted by Deirdre (Connecticut) on 06/07/2021

Hi Gina,

So sorry you are going through this. Please read all the borax and diatomaceous posts on Earth Clinic in the pet flea section (where your post is located). Sounds like you need to treat your backyard FIRST and those two remedies are mentioned for treating flea infestations both indoors and outdoors. You'll have to reapply after it rains, but one of them should help. If you use diatomaceous earth, please note that it must be food grade.

Also, consider a raw food (or freeze dried raw) diet to strengthen your pup's immune system. That might help too. Quality food can make a huge difference in flea control I've discovered over the years.

Good luck. Hope you get this issue solved very quickly.


Lemon Juice
Posted by Mira (Los Angeles) on 07/26/2018
5 out of 5 stars

I found that diatomaceous earth and tea tree oil were not effective for a flea infestation. Luckily, I tried lemon juice spray and was amazed by how effective it was.

I took a few small whole lemons, skin, seeds and all, and blended them with some water (not too much) and strained the mixture. I spray some on my hands and rub it into my kitty from head to tail. I also spray it outside and indoors. Smells great. She licks it off and is perfectly healthy and much happier now that the fleas are gone.

Plz read my post under tea tree oil for more info.


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