Purslane Herbal Remedies

Sep 11, 2016

While it typically earns a great deal of contempt from the Department of Agriculture, purslane is actually a superfood. High in omega 3 fatty acids, purslane also possesses a variety of other nutritional benefits. Making appearances in farmers’ markets and even fancy restaurants, purslane should also become a household staple, as it is a potent health remedy.

What is Purslane?

Often labeled as a “weed,” purslane is actually a succulent herb. The plant is formally known as portulaca oleracea and less affectionately called little hogweed. The plant looks similar to the common jade plant and generally has fleshy, round leaves growing from a thin stalk.

The flavor components alone are often enough to make individuals try the herb. The leaves are the most important part of the plant and offer a moisture-rich bite similar to the crispness of a fresh cucumber. The leaves also render a note of lemony tang with a bit of a peppery finish.

Taste is not the only reason to eat this plant, however. It is considered by many as “a miracle plant.” Purslane literally has the highest level of omega 3 fats than any other green plants. It also boasts an assortment of other vitamins and nutrients.

Health Benefits of Purslane

In addition to its nearly 400mg of omega 3 fatty acids per serving, purslane also offers a variety of other nutrients. The tender, leafy plant also possesses a number of nutrients including vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, iron, calcium, manganese, magnesium, and potassium.

These nutrients make the plant an effective herbal refreshment for health and wellness. Its high concentrations of omega 3 fats make it an effective treatment for boosting heart health, lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, and controlling symptoms of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism. Its nutrient profile also make it an effective treatment for diabetes, asthma, migraines, and osteoporosis. The herb can even prevent cancer, promote skin health and boost immunity.

While labeled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a “noxious weed,” purslane is actually a beneficial health supplement. Besides that, it also tastes delicious.



Growing Purslane  

Posted by Wendy (Farmington, Mi) on 10/03/2009

Hi, I have not used purslane medicinally yet, but I can verify that it is very tasty! I was introduced to it in an event at Matthei Gardens in Ann Arbor which included a tour of the herb garden. Our guide had us all taste purslane, and I loved it!

I have ordered purslane seeds online to grow a more upright variety of the plant, and I have also uprooted some from public sidewalks that no one seemed to want. Be careful though! Purslane has a poisonous look alike (spurge) Purslane leaves are plump and shiny, the leaves of the lookalike are flat and not shiny at all. Spurge gives off a milky sap when the stem is broken, so if you see that, don't eat it! If you have any doubt, just buy the seeds.

If you google purslane, you will find all kinds of info on how to grow it and recipes.


Purslane Feedback  

5 star (1) 
  100%
Share your thoughts with our readers
Write a review


Posted by Deirdre (Earth Clinic) on 07/07/2009
5 out of 5 stars

I heard about purslane back in April when my husband's friend Mark was visiting from Canada and raved to us about it. Took me a couple months to get around to it, but I finally ordered the capsules from Canada (dreadfully expensive, unfortunately) two weeks ago and now can provide initial feedback on the herb. I also called Mark to ask for his feedback to post on Earth Clinic, since he's been taking it for over 2 years now.

First, Mark's feedback:

Mark has an anemic condition since having his spleen removed in his early 20s... His hemoglobin count was 80-85 for most of his adult life. Now it is 110. The only new thing he has added to his diet has been the purslane supplements, of which he takes 2 a day. His energy level has increased on it, also his sleep is better. Finally, no cold sores for the entire amount of time he's been on it.

My initial feedback after 7 days:

Increased stamina, which has shown up most obviously in karate. My energy typically ebbs by the end of the week when I am tired from training a few days in a row. Not so since taking purslane. Of course it's been too soon to know if this initial increase of energy will last, but I will report back in a few months.

Next - sleep. Yep, it's true. Deep, restful sleep. Vivid dreams too.

Will give another update in a few months, but this is my initial report on purslane for now. Hopefully some of the reputable US herbal companies will give this common weed notice and come to market with some affordable/competitive pricing. For now our choices are to pay $57 for a bottle of 60 pills from the only company producing purslane capsules, or consuming copious amounts of purslane in order to get the 500 mg!!

P.S. The only side effect I have experienced is feeling somewhat dehydrated upon waking. So increased water a night is a good idea!

Replied by Rena
Mineral Bluff, Georgia
07/07/2009

Hi Deidre From Earth Clinic, You can purchase Purslane powder for as little as $15.00 to $18.00 a pound and encapsulate them yourself. I never buy the herbs from stores anymore, so much cheaper to make them myself, Peace, Rena.

EC: Thanks, Rena! Any idea how much mg. of purslane you get from a capsule's worth of the powder?

Replied by Rena
Mineral Bluff, Georgia
07/08/2009

Hi Deidre From Earth Clinic,

It does depend on the size caps you are using, and the density of the powder since Mg is a weight measurement. I can give you approx: This was taken from the cap website.

"000" 1370 mgs.
"00" 950 mgs.
"0" 680 mgs.
"1" 500 mgs.

I only use the "00" size myself, and the machine that goes with that size. When you purchase the machine, be mindful of the size the machine says on the package, and the size caps you choose to use. The one machine does not work on all size caps, only the size indicated on the package. I can tell you from experience, a one pound package of herb powder will fill over 1,500 capsules with the "00" caps. Now talk about cost effective, Peace, Rena.

EC: Thanks so much for the info, Rena. Great to know...

Deirdre

Replied by Gloria
Brentwood, Ny
04/04/2010

Verdolaga it's a weed. My family used it for salads, it's very tasty and healthy. My grandmother used to say that verdolaga was one of the best cure-all herbs. Sadly people don't eat it anymore. I'm considering this summer to add it to every salad I make. You don't need to buy capsules or anything just go to your sidewalk and pull it just as you can do with dandelion. I laugh when I see people spending money at the supermarket from buying a bunch of dandelion and then they come home and de-weed their yard from the same plant!!

Replied by Deanna Michelle
Shreveport, Louisiana
10/15/2011

Does anybody know where can I purchase quality herb powders? Thank you in advance for caring and sharing.

Replied by Bess
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
10/15/2011

Hi Deanna - I know quite a few people who have ordered from Mountain Rose Herbs and always seemed satisfied. They have organic, non-irradiated and ethically harvested products. Their Web site is:

http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/

The other one that is very popular is:

http://www.iherb.com/

Or check your health food store - sometimes they have large glass dispensary jars with various herbs, some powdered, and you can measure out the amount you need. Be sure to get organic herbs, though.

Good luck! Bess


Where to Buy: India  

Posted by Mudassir (Hyderabad, India) on 10/19/2009

hi we are suppliers of pursline seeds in bulk quantity in india any body need please contact us to my email, [email protected] or 919392389863

EC: Pursline is the same as Purslane, we hope?!


Where to Buy: Uk  

Replied by Dawn
Yorkshire, Uk
09/10/2016

Would be nice if someone else supplying UK could link as this supplier seems to have removed his listing. Thank you.


Where to Buy: USA  

5 star (2) 
  100%
Share your thoughts with our readers
Write a review


Posted by Merryanne (Orange City, Florida, Usa) on 04/26/2010 120 posts
5 out of 5 stars

Hello, This is Merryanne in Central FL,,I just found Purslane for sale in my neighborhood,,I went to an open air market, it is always there on Saturday and Sunday,but I had not been to it in several years, well I was looking at the Mexican tables of produce and was schocked!!! There lay stacks of bundled purslane for $1.75, I was shocked,,I have spent a lot of time online looking for it and it is in my own neighborhood,,,If anyone is looking for it try you spanish stores, especilly the Mexican stores,,The man there said it is farmed just like there other crops. So I am going to start eating it and learn to make smothies.

Replied by Nancy
Deland, Fl
04/28/2011

Merryanne, I too have been looking for Purslane! I live in Deland, FL. Where exactly in Orange City did you find the Purslane?? Thanks very much.

Replied by Purslane
Farmington, Mi
09/15/2011
5 out of 5 stars

Hi! I am Mexican, and also a chef. Purslane is a common herb in traditional mexican cuisine. Almost every ethnic mexican store that carries fresh vegetables will carry it. Purslane is known by its high content in iron, which is higher than in spinach.

A common way to eat it is in a dish called "cerdo con verdolagas" (pork with purslane). It is made by making a green sauce with tomatillos, and then adding cooked and fried pieces of pork, and lots of purslane stems. All this is simmered until the purslane its cooked. I have made my US colleagues tried it and they loved it!! They would hardly believe that they were eating what in here, the US, is considered "a weed".

Replied by Dan
Colorado Springs, Colorado
12/04/2011

If you are in the market for purslane supplements, go to Natural Plantation.com They have several different products using purslane. All the best.

Replied by Amyg
Houston, Texas, Usa
12/30/2011

Is this is same type of Purslane that is sold at plant nurseries? My family owns a small nursery, we mainly sell bedding plants for the landscape. (begonias, petunias, pansies, ect. ) We also sell common purslane, it comes in several colors. I was wondering if this is the same kind that is being used medicinally or if it is a different variety. Thank you for your feedback!

Replied by Joyce
Joelton, Tennessee
01/06/2012
516 posts

Amy, the answer to your question is probably yes, but if you want to be positive just type "purslane/pictures of" in your search window. I know I have eaten the plump little leaves off some of the purslane that I bought from a nursery with no problems.

I have also eaten some leaves off moss roses and other purslane plants growing wild with no problems.