12 Natural Remedies for Fibroids

General Feedback
Posted by Ec Fan (California, US) on 12/02/2014
1 out of 5 stars

Warning

I was someone who had a big fibroid (8-11 cm) but little did I realize how big that really is until a doctor pointed it out to me. I didn't believe any of my doctors who said that I must consider surgery. I thought they just want to make money, that's all! I kept coming to this site most of all and read bleeding experiences of women whos bleeding would miraculously stop on ACV etc. None of these women reported their condition a few months from their severe bleeding episodes. So I kept hoping my fibroid would just disappear or at the most the symptoms would come to an end. I was WRONG. I would just keep looking for & trying natural remedies one after another while my condition kept getting worse and I ended up in the ER 4-5 times, with profuse bleeding, gigantic clots, high pulse rate (you can die if the bleeding isn't controlled) and was given blood transfusions multiple times, my levels had dropped as low as 6! Finally I relented for a surgery after struggling with pain, anemia, fatigue and bleeding for 5 YEARS! I have been the happiest since, with my energy back and am no more anemic for the first time in life and my blood levels are in the range of 12-14 without taking iron pills! My request to all women is, if you are consistently having severe symptoms, don't take health into your own hands or even surrender it to naturopaths. Just go to the traditional doctors! You'll be glad you did. Mainstream medicine and doctors saved my life! Please be smart to know when to stop trying natural remedies and when to trust the medical industry. This site is a great resource otherwise!


General Feedback
Posted by Maria (Baltimore, Md, Usa) on 02/13/2012
1 out of 5 stars

A hysterectomy may lead to a prolapse about 5-10 years down the road. The uterus is not just there for holding a fetus; it's very important in helping support the abdominal organs such as the intestines and the bladder. The abdominal organs stay in place due to a network of ligaments and pelvic floor muscles. When the uterus is removed as in a hysterectomy, this support system is greatly weakened and so these other organs have a lot less support, and tend to fall down or move into spaces they normally don't. (please google images) If you have a partial hysterectomy, the top of the vagina could fall down; sometimes the bladder herniates and sometimes the bowel moves into places it should not- all these lead to more surgeries down the road.

Interestingly, when my OB suggested hysterectomy to me for my fibroids, I do not remember her saying one single word about a prolapse down the road. I wonder if she is shilling for the OB surgeon. It's also possible that prolapse happens more often if you have a weak pelvic floor to begin with; but, as a woman ages, her ligaments and muscles get weaker anyhow, and chances of prolapse get higher even if she has a normal pelvic floor. I do not want to contribute to that by having a hysterectomy- not if my fibroid symptoms aren't that bad.