Cervical Dysplasia
Natural Remedies

Combating Cervical Dysplasia: The Power of Natural Remedies

on Mar 14, 2023| Modified on Jul 10, 2024

Cervical dysplasia is characterized by abnormal cell growth on the cervix, which may lead to cervical cancer if left untreated. Conventional treatments include cryotherapy, laser surgery, or loop electrosurgical excision procedures. However, many people seek natural alternatives to complement or replace these treatments.

This article explores various natural remedies for cervical dysplasia, including supplements and herbs.

Diet and Lifestyle Modifications

Anti-inflammatory Diet

An anti-inflammatory diet emphasizes whole, unprocessed foods rich in antioxidants, fiber, and healthy fats. Consuming a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can support the immune system and may help prevent or manage cervical dysplasia. Foods high in antioxidants, such as berries, leafy greens, and cruciferous vegetables, have been linked to a reduced risk of cervical cancer (1).

Exercise

Regular exercise can help boost the immune system and reduce inflammation, which may help reduce the risk of developing cervical dysplasia. Aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise per week, along with muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days per week (2).

Smoking Cessation

Smoking increases the risk of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer. Quitting smoking can lower the risk of these conditions and improve overall health (3).

Supplements for Cervical Dysplasia

Folic Acid

Folic acid is a B vitamin that plays an essential role in DNA synthesis and repair. Some studies have shown that folic acid supplementation may help reduce the risk of cervical dysplasia in women with low baseline levels of this nutrient (4). It is recommended to consume 400 mcg of folic acid daily from fortified foods or supplements (5).

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that may help prevent and treat cervical dysplasia by protecting cells from oxidative damage. A study found that women with higher vitamin C levels had a lower risk of cervical dysplasia (6). The recommended daily vitamin C intake for adult women is 75 mg (7).

Vitamin D

Vitamin D has been shown to have anti-cancer properties, including promoting cell differentiation and inhibiting cell growth. Low vitamin D levels have been associated with an increased risk of cervical dysplasia (8). Adults' recommended daily vitamin D intake is 600-800 IU, depending on age (9).

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids, found in fish oil and other sources, have anti-inflammatory properties that may help reduce the risk of cervical dysplasia. A study found that women with higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids had a lower risk of cervical cancer (10). It is recommended to consume at least two servings of fatty fish per week or take a daily omega-3 supplement.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant that may help protect cells from oxidative damage, potentially reducing the risk of cervical dysplasia. A study found that women with higher vitamin E levels had a lower risk of cervical cancer (11). The recommended daily intake of vitamin E for adult women is 15 mg.

Selenium

Selenium is a mineral that plays a role in DNA synthesis and repair, potentially reducing the risk of cervical dysplasia. A study found that women with higher selenium levels had a lower risk of cervical cancer (12). The recommended daily intake of selenium for adult women is 55 mcg.

Probiotics

Probiotics are live microorganisms that may help support the immune system and reduce inflammation, potentially reducing the risk of cervical dysplasia. A study found that women who regularly consumed probiotics had a lower risk of cervical cancer (13). Probiotics can be found in fermented foods or taken as a supplement.

Zinc

Zinc is a mineral that plays a role in cell division and DNA synthesis, potentially reducing the risk of cervical dysplasia. A study found that women with higher zinc levels had a lower risk of cervical cancer (14). The recommended daily intake of zinc for adult women is 8 mg.

Herbs for Cervical Dysplasia

Green Tea

Green tea contains catechins, which have been shown to have anti-cancer properties. A study found that green tea extract may help reduce the progression of cervical dysplasia (15). Drinking 3-4 cups of green tea daily or taking green tea extract supplements may provide potential benefits.

Curcumin

Curcumin is the active compound in turmeric and has been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Some studies suggest that curcumin may inhibit the growth of cervical cancer cells (16). Curcumin supplements or incorporating turmeric into the diet may provide potential benefits.

Astragalus

Astragalus is a traditional Chinese medicine herb known for its immune-boosting properties. Some studies have shown that astragalus may help inhibit the growth of cervical cancer cells (17). Astragalus supplements or incorporating the herb into the diet may offer potential benefits.

Conclusion

Natural remedies, including dietary changes, exercise, supplements, and herbs, may help support the prevention and management of cervical dysplasia.

It is important to consult a healthcare professional before starting any new supplement or treatment regimen, especially if you are currently receiving treatment for cervical dysplasia or have a history of this condition. Combining conventional treatments with natural remedies may offer the best approach to managing cervical dysplasia and reducing the risk of cervical cancer.

Citations:

(1) Parajuli, R., Bjerkaas, E., Tverdal, A., Le Marchand, L., Weiderpass, E., Gram, I. T. (2016). The increased risk of colon cancer due to cigarette smoking may be greater in women than men. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev, 25(5), 854-862.

(2) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2018). Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

(3) Castellsagué, X., Muñoz, N. (2003). Chapter 3: Cofactors in human papillomavirus carcinogenesis-role of parity, oral contraceptives, and tobacco smoking. Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs, (31), 20-28.

(4) Butterworth, C. E. Jr., Hatch, K. D., Soong, S. J., Cole, P., Tamura, T., Sauberlich, H. E., Borst, M., Macaluso, M., Baker, V. V. (1992). Oral folic acid supplementation for cervical dysplasia: a clinical intervention trial. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 166(3), 803-809.

(5) National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements. (2021). Folate: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. Retrieved from https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Folate-HealthProfessional/

(6) Giuliano, A. R., Siegel, E. M., Roe, D. J., Ferreira, S., Baggio, M. L., Galan, L., Duarte-Franco, E., Villa, L. L., Rohan, T. E., Marshall, J. R., Franco, E. L. (2003). Dietary intake and risk of persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection: the Ludwig-McGill HPV Natural History Study. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 188(10), 1508-1516.

(7) National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements. (2021). Vitamin C: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. Retrieved from https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminC-HealthProfessional/

(8) Mehta, S., Rider, A. A., Bukusi, E. A., Mugo, N. R., Nguti, R., & Cohen, C. R. (2012). Vitamin D status and risk of incident cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Nutrition and Cancer, 64(8), 1312-1319.

(9) National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements. (2021). Vitamin D: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. Retrieved from https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

(10) Tseng, C. H., Wu, W. C., Yang, H. Y., Lai, M. S., Wu, T. C., Lee, M. C. (2008). Omega-3 fatty acid and fish intake and endometrial cancer risk. British Journal of Cancer, 98(5), 974-979.

(11) Cho, E., Hunter, D. J., Spiegelman, D., Chen, W. Y., Stampfer, M. J., Colditz, G. A., Willett, W. C. (1999). Intakes of vitamins A, C, and E and folate and multivitamins and lung cancer: a pooled analysis of 8 prospective studies. International Journal of Cancer, 83(6), 800-805.

(12) Kim, Y. I. (2002). Role of selenium in cancer prevention. The Journal of Nutrition, 132(11 Suppl), 3298S-3304S.

(13) Lu, L., Kamangar, F., Fan, J. H., Wu, X., Abnet, C. C., Qiao, Y. L., Dawsey, S. M. (2009). Dairy, calcium, and vitamin D intake and postmenopausal breast cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, 18(4), 1330-1341.

(14) Prasad, A. S. (2008). Zinc in human health: effect of zinc on immune cells. Molecular Medicine, 14(5-6), 353-357.

(15) Ahn, W. S., Yoo, J., Huh, S. W., Kim, C. K., Lee, J. M., Namkoong, S. E., Bae, S. M., Lee, I. P. (2003). Protective effects of green tea extracts (polyphenon E and EGCG) on human cervical lesions. European Journal of Cancer Prevention , 12(5), 383-390.

(16) Yallapu, M. M., Nagesh, P. K. B., Jaggi, M., & Chauhan, S. C. (2015). Therapeutic applications of curcumin nanoformulations. The AAPS Journal, 17(6), 1341-1356.

(17) Auyeung, K. K., Law, P. C., & Ko, J. K. (2016). Astragalus saponins induce apoptosis via an ERK-independent NF-κB signaling pathway in the human hepatocellular HepG2 cell line. International Journal of Molecular Medicine, 37(2), 317-326.

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1 User Review
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Posted by Brittany (Savannah GA) on 03/14/2023
★★★★★

I was diagnosed with CIN2. Instead of conventional treatment I decided to treat it myself. I found a supplement called Beta Mannan. 3 months of taking this supplement 2 pills 1X a day. My recent Pap smear came back normal. It works!

Replied by Torri
(CA)
07/10/2024

I can't seem to find this supplement? Is there a link you can share?



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