Tachycardia Remedies and Natural Cures

Last Modified on Dec 19, 2014


Iron   0  1   

Posted by MzM (Chicago, IL) on 06/12/2009

If your tachycardia is due to an insufficient due to not eating properly its probably because your iron intake is low. good sources for iron intake are red meat or dark leafy vegetables high in Iron. Multivitamins or even iron supplements (Slow release iron) is helpful. Iron is responsible for carrying and binding oxygen to red blood cells. Low Iron = low absorption of oxygen = your heart needs to beat faster to supply your body with oxygen.

Replied by Chris
Raumati South, Wellington, New Zealand
03/31/2013
It's not true that if you have palpitations it's (only) because your iron is low. This is one case but not all. I suffered from palpitations for years and I eat a very healthy diet. I have since found out I have SVT. No extra iron helps me. Food avoidance is key for me e.g. oils, chocolate, caffeine, alcohol, etc. Also supplements which are aimed at "heart health" can have bad effects on tachycardia sufferers e.g. Co-Q10 will trigger an SVT episode for me & I have found others the same. Magnesium is the same too. I have to avoid multivitamins with too much magnesium in them.
Replied by Lou
Tyler, Tx
08/15/2013
[NAY]   I ate two spinach salads in the last 48 hours and I had an episode (my first one that was noticeable). Spinach has a lot of iron.

Magnesium Water   1  0   

Posted by Rick (New Bloomfield, PA) on 07/03/2007

[YEA]  No particular ailment, but I have been interested in Magnesium supplementation ever since I had a couple of "racing heart" episodes several years back, and discovered that I could calm things down by taking Epsom Salts (Magnesium Sulfate) in water... awful taste and also a powerful laxative. I began to wonder how I could get the same effect in a more palatable way, without the laxative effect. Eventually I found the"Magnesium" webpage and learned the following:

How to make your own Magnesium water [like the 'Noah' water being sold by a certain company, which bottles water from a spring that is naturally rich in bicarbonates of Magnesium].

The assumption is that we could all use more magnesium in our diet, which may help reduce blood pressure, reduce the likelihood of kidney stones, etc.

Here's how to make your own Mg-rich drinking water:

Buy a bottle of Carbonated Seltzer water - NO SODIUM, just carbonated "fizz" water, unflavored. Refrigerate for a couple of hours.

Get another, larger bottle, and pour 2/3 of a capful of PLAIN (no-flavor) Philips Milk of Magnesia (which is Magnesium Oxide, an alkaline laxative) into the large bottle. (The bottle comes with a plastic measuring cup which is what I mean when I say 2/3 capful.)

Now quickly open the bottle of carbonated water (water carbonic acid) and empty it into the large bottle containing the 2/3 capful of Magnesia.

Shake well.

You will have a bottle of milky/cloudy liquid which is in the process of neutralization between the carbonic acid and the magnesium oxide-- leaving a neutral salt, Magnesium Bicarbonate.

Let the cloudy mixture sit for a while at room temperature, until the liquid clears; there will be some white precipitate at the bottom. Shake again and let sit again. When clear, refrigerate. THIS IS YOUR MAGNESIUM BICARBONATE CONCENTRATE. Unlike the chalky taste of straight Milk of Magnesia, or the biting-fizzy taste of seltzer water, your concentrate will have a strong, sweet, slightly "soapy" taste. You will be DILUTING it in water for drinking purposes.

When it has chilled, pour a small amount into an empty 1 liter bottle (approx. 1/2" of concentrate at the bottom) and fill the rest of the bottle with pure drinking water.

You have now created a sweet-tasting, Magnesium-enriched drinking water, and you're also getting your Bi-carbs without all the Sodium you'd be getting from Baking Soda.

I have been making and drinking this Mg water since Nov. 2006 (I write this in July of 2007) and have not had any bad effects from it. I take a bottle to work and sip it during the day. My resting heart rate seems to have gone down and I feel more relaxed in general. I can't say it has greatly improved my high blood pressure, but it has helped some, and I know I am getting enough Magnesium. Probably would be beneficial to supplement with Calcium for balance.

Try it and see what it does for you.

Magnesium, Potassium   1  0   

Posted by Sonya (Dfw, Tx) on 12/16/2013

[YEA]  I have been increasingly stressed at work lately, such that when I log off the computer (when working from home) I go upstairs and lay down in my bed to 'hide' from it. I have been having tight chest, mild- to medium anxiety attacks, heart palpitations, shortness of breath, and most recently, tachycardia.

This weekend it was the worst. I just couldn't catch my breath all weekend, and finally I decided to take my pulse. 108 bpm! Crazy, it's never that hight and all the symptoms going with it are very unusual for me -- until about a month or two ago, this kind of thing was something I only thought happened to other people since I have always been 'text book' in the pulse / blood pressure / etc departments.

Anyways, for some reason I had a flash of an idea -- I am a regular taker of potassium and magnesium, mostly due to muscle stiffness and soreness, but I had run out of potassium several months back, and continued on with the magnesium until about 5 weeks ago when I ran out of that too. I was doing ok, so I figured I would buy some when I got to the vitamin shop. Well - I kept forgetting. I mentioned to my husband to look up magnesium in conjunction with heart rate -- and the second article he found said that heart rate is governed by magnesium (foremost) and potassium (secondly). Then he asked if I had any put away in the emergency box. And I knew I did.

I took 400 mg magnsium, and 198mcg Potassium and within 20 minutes I was down to 86 bpm. Another 20 minutes after that, I was down to 76 bpm. I am normally around 70 bpm, resting, so I was reassured.

I had to take more when I woke up in the morning as I was back up to almost 90bpm, but I know that both potassium and magnesium are cumulative, and I figure I must have been seriously depleted.

Now the interesting conundrum -- was I really as stressed at work as I thought I was? Or was my 'stress' actually a result of depleted Magnesium and Potassium stores? I feel much better today, but only time will tell, I suspect.

Replied by Dave
Fountain Inn,sc
12/16/2013
To Sonya,

Re your question about fast heart rate and how magnesium and potassium helped you...after the good news that your heart rate went way down after starting back on those two and the pressure at work seemed more manageable...you ask: Could the lack of the two (magnesium and potassium) have caused you to be LESS able to handle the stress?????

VERY perceptive, Sonya and the answer is absolutely YES. Having enough magnesium and potassium enable the system to handle stress much more efficiently and you can easily "roll with the punches" if your system is fortified with those two miracle working supplements.

In the "olden times" our great grandparents would joke that if a person was tense and agitated then that anxious individual "needed his salts" meaning a long series of soakings in "Epson salts baths" which is Magnesium sulfate. Multiple baths ( two cups of Epsom salts ) poured into a very warm bath and the person soaks for twenty minutes therein; such to be repeated four or five times in the following ten days until a slight bit of the salts remains on the skin indicating that the magnesium saturation is met. But also one should consume the tables orally too as you said you do.

The point is you are right in your question; Life is just flat out better with consumption of magnesium and potassium and the heart works better too. Any Afib problem...90 of them...are magnesium and potassium depletion related. (Add natural ...NOT synthetic Vitamin E...only found in a health food store, not drug store...and the cardio problems diminish greatly.)

Motherwort and Hawthorn   2  0   

Posted by Jerry (Seal Beach, California, Usa) on 11/14/2011

[YEA]  I have found hawthorn and motherwort together to be a reliable cure for my PSVT's (paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia) in which my heart would race at speeds of 160 to even over 200 per minute.

First, I use a liquid extract, alcohol free if possible. I used to use an alcohol extract but it did not work anything like the alcohol-free. After experimenting with different manufacturers I settled on Nature's Answer alcohol-free hawthorn and Nature's Answer low-alcohol motherwort. These people are based in Hauppauge, New York, and I have no connection with them whatever except as happy user of their products. After a couple years, Nature's Answer turned their hawthorn into hawthorn berry (which it was originally), leaf and flower. On the Net I found this combo supposedly reinforced the properties of the hawthorn berry. I found it had no different ability to stop my cardiac arrhythmia. Same speed.

Nature's Answer motherwort is about 15 percent alcohol. Some experimentation with different manufacturers years ago made it clear you can't put motherwort in solution without using some alcohol, or it will come out of solution. Even so, you still need to shake the motherwort extract to get it evenly distributed.

This stuff can get rid of an attack of PSVTs like lightning. I keep a quarter ounce bottle with glass eye dropper on me at all times, mixed with a 50% hawthorn-50% motherwort mixture. That 50 percent is by volume, not weight, say a full level teaspoon of each. And I shake each one thoroughly before adding to the mix.

Once in a while I will get a warning jump in my chest saying my heart could go into fast heartbeat. I will sit down as soon as possible, take out my bottle of herbs, shake it well, and fill the dropper about 1/3 to 1/2 full. I always sit or lie down whenever I get a heart incident so I don't have any strain on the heart, and I will stay down for maybe ten minutes.

If I have gone into full tachycardia, where my heart is beating 160-200 beats a minute, I don't care where I am, I lie down. I get my bottle of herbs out, shake it thoroughly, and put a dropper full into my mouth. How fast is it? Once when I couldn't lie down, I was in my car on the freeway, I parked it as soon as I could and took my dropper full. I couldn't get the dropper back in the bottle fast enough to beat my heart getting back to normal. It took one second for my heartbeat to resume normal beating.

This remedy has NEVER failed me. I have gotten into the habit, over the years, of taking 1/3 dropper full after breakfast, 1/3 dropper full after lunch, and 1/3 dropper full after supper. I have noticed that scars that seemed to be getting deeper with age began to disappear, to where they are barely noticeable nowadays. I am 81.

Symptoms that might accompany this remedy being more effective: the tongue is red compared to a fresh cut pork chop. The left pulse between the wrist crease and the head of the radius tends to be weak, perhaps weaker than the pulse at any other position.

I can't guarantee this will work for you. I can tell you it is greased lightning working on me. My incidence of heart palpitations has dropped from several bouts per week to perhaps one every two to five years. I NEVER leave my hawthorn-motherwort on the dresser at home. It is in my pocket at all times.

If you need any further info, I'm at jerrmar1(at)verizon.net

Replied by Donna
Drexel Hill, Pa
11/15/2011
Thanks Jerry from Seal Beach, Cal. I have had episodes of Tachycardia for close to 30 years and I really appreciate the advice you gave on Motherwort and Hawthorn. I will have to do a little more research into these two herbal treatments but it sounds like a good answer to my heart palpitations. Right now I use cayenne pepper in warm water to help slow down my racing heart. Thanks again and God Bless!
Replied by Mike
San Francisco, Ca
06/27/2013
[YEA]   Thank you so much for this tip. My palpitations lasted sometimes for hours. I am convinced that motherwort which I take under the tongue at the first sign of a flare up is as helpful as you describe. I had been doing many other things, including rubbing myself with magnesium oil, eating smaller meals, and so on, too. Thank you very much. This is the first time in my life that I have ever commented at a forum like this.
Replied by Elise
Brooklyn, Ny
12/19/2014
Well done.

Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome Remedies   0  0   

Posted by Clare (New Jersey) on 08/23/2013

I have used your site for many years now to treat a myriad of ailments. However, when I needed information to help my postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, there is no information. I would really appreciate a tab being opened where new information on how to help those of us with this condition gather knowledge.

Thank you, did I mention I love ec? I love your site and am thankful it's been a ton of help

Replied by Toourlady89
Ca, Usa
08/23/2013
One reason this could possibly happen is when someone is hypertensive and is taking diuretics. Diuretics pulls out body fluids which could lead to dehydration. So if and when you stand up and feel tachycardic (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia), it could be telling you that you need fluids. Coconut water is one of the best fluid replacement for dehydration from diuretics, or from losing fluids thru exercise, etc. Magnesium supplementation would also be a good idea to relax your heart and prevent rapid heart beats. Mg Glycinate is a good form of Mg, without laxative side effects.

Pots Syndrome   0  0   

Posted by Anon (Anon, USA) on 01/28/2013

Looking for wisdom, guidance, and help for Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome.

Thank you!

Replied by Connie
Slc, Utah, USA
01/29/2013
Hi Anon; There's only a little info about this, but POTS [Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome] is associated with B12 deficiency.

Personally, I haven't been diagnosed with POTS, but I've had severe orthostatic intolerance, vertigo, and tachycardia from B12 deficiency.







 



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