Osteopenia Remedies

Last Modified on Jun 21, 2014

Treating osteopenia involves boosting the bone mineral density. Natural options for treatment include a variety of minerals and mineral rich supplements. In addition to a healthy, balanced diet, supplements can effectively treat osteopenia.

What is Osteopenia?

Osteopenia is a condition defined as lower than normal bone mineral density. The mineral density associated with osteopenia is low compared to peak levels however still higher than that labeled as osteoporosis. The condition has no symptoms although the risk for bone breakage or fracture may be greater than normal.

Osteopenia is a condition that typically develops with age. While some individuals may naturally have a predisposition to a lower bone density; however, several other factors contribute to osteopenia. Eating disorders, metabolism issues, chemotherapy and other medications as well as exposure to radiation may contribute to low bone density. Additionally, being thing, Caucasian or Asian, getting limited exercise, smoking, drinking cola and consuming excessive amounts of alcohol also contribute to osteopenia.

Natural Remedies for Low Bone Mineral Density

Osteopenia treatments include remedies that boost bone mineral density. Vitamin D and calcium are two of the most important supplements. Additionally, exercise helps maintain strong bones and reverse the symptoms of osteopenia.

Calcium

Calcium is one of the most important bone-building minerals. A calcium supplement fortifies the bones and aids in a number of other bodily processes.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D helps the body absorb and utilize calcium. A calcium supplement is only effective if the body has an appropriate level of vitamin D, so taking a vitamin D supplement is also important.

Exercise

Exercise is one of the most important components of maintaining strong bones. Bone forms and grows in response to physical stress, so weight-bearing exercises help build and rebuild bones. Walking, hiking, dancing and light weight lifting are all effective exercises for treating osteopenia.

Osteopenia is a condition characterized by lower than normal bone mineral density. A condition that increases in risk over time, osteopenia can be managed and treated effectively using supplements and other natural treatment methods.

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Posted by Terri (Lincoln, Mt) on 12/10/2009

Ted, are there any natural remedies for osteopenia? Would Apple Cider Vinegar be a good form of minerals and vitamins for this?

Thank you,
Terri

Posted by Janet
Benton Harbor, Michigan
05/10/2010
I was diagnosed with "osteoporosis" about 18 years ago. I took all the different meds you hear so much about including hormones. I was told that each one was the best thing since sliced bread. Only to find out by the doctors, themselves that most were doing harm to my body instead of good. As it turned out these meds were NOT working as well as planned anyway. (along with all the side effects)and decided I would find a natural way...........I read and researched anything I could get my hands. I talked to many, many naturalists, herbalists, and healthfood store employees/owners...........I stopped taking the meds for two years before I started my new plan........For starters I got a bone density test one year after I "stopped" the meds for osteoporosis..........I took herbal calcium, herbal bone and tissue, and 4,000 to 6,000 i.u. of vitamin D daily. Exactly 1 year later I had another bone density test done...........My numbers had gone from "Osteoporosis" to "Osteopenia" in just one year. I was doing cartwheels I was so happy............You MUST always have your density tests done on the same machine each time because machines can be calibrated a little differently. This way it is more acurate and will show progress (or degress)more accuratly.....It's only been 1 year so I am still watching my progress carefully just in case, but I am VERY hopeful about this....TO START:

(1) get bone density test done

(2) get vitamin D test to see

where your D level is( this

should be done every

6 to 12 mo.to keep it at

at the right level.

(3) start the herbal calcium

(4) start the herbal bone & tissue

(5) start vitamin D, 4,000 to 6,000 i.u.daily.
(get a good one)
You can do the research.

(6) walk or lift weights 20 to 30

minutes 3 or 4 times /week.

the more the better.

Posted by Mary
Regina, Saskchewan
05/29/2010
83 Posts
Hello: thanks for all your diligent research. wondering if you could tell me more about this herbal bone and tissue, and also what exactly is in it and in the herbal calcium? Also did you know how much radiation we get when we get a bone density scan?

Thanks alot.
Mary

Posted by Ethne
Ariel, Samaria, Israel
10/25/2010
I am interested to know more about herbal calcium, and herbal bone and tissue mentioned. Does the dexa scan for osteoporosis have radiation risks if done once a year in order to check on bone density changes?
Thanks, Ethne
Posted by Melissa
Old Saybrook, Ct.
02/08/2011
2 Posts
Osteopenia, I would like the two questions asked to be answered.

1. what is herbal calcium????

2. what is the herbal bone and tissue they talked about to take????

Posted by Patti B
Jamison, Pa, Usa
05/09/2011
7 Posts
Would Janet from Benton Harbor, Michigan please answer the questions posted?
Posted by Mary Anne
Yucca Valley, Ca
05/18/2011
I typed in herbal calcium on the internet and discovered a product made of plant calcium by a company called Dr. Christopher, who also makes an herbal bone and tissue product.







 



DISCLAIMER: Our readers offer information and opinions on Earth Clinic, not as a substitute for professional medical prevention, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with your physician, pharmacist, or health care provider before taking any home remedies or supplements or following any treatment suggested by anyone on this site. Only your health care provider, personal physician, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for your unique needs or diagnose your particular medical history.

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