Remedies for Rectal and Anus Issues in Dogs

Oct 30, 2014

Some of the most uncomfortable problems that our dogs have to deal with are diseases of the anus and rectum. While some of these ailments are inherited, others are often seen in older dogs. Early diagnosis is recommended; some conditions are easily treated while others may become chronic.  It's worthwhile knowing what 'normal' is for your dog, so that anything out of the ordinary will be spotted.  High performance dogs and dogs with lumbar spine injuries may also have anal gland problems.

Natural Remedies for Rectum and Anus Issues

Anal gland problems are a signal that something is going wrong in the dog's body. Processed pet food and treats can cause or exacerbate the problem.  Eliminate grains, corn, potato, oatmeal, wheat, rice or soy.

Don't feed the same protein all of the time.  Try something new, like rabbit or bison.  Food allergies can cause chronic anal sac problems.

Pumpkin and soft kibble are useful natural remedies.

Fish oils / Omega 3 oils are often effective for reducing itching and inflammation.

Strengthen rectal and abdominal muscles with regular exercise.

It can be worthwhile to run a HairQ test which will show the dog's endocrine balance, any mineral dificiencies or excess and the levels of arsenic, lead and mercury.

Anal and Rectum Ailments

Anal Sac Disease is the most common disease of the anal region.  It is caused when the glands on either side of the tale become clogged or infected and produce dark, foul-smelling liquid.  This is primarly a small breed problem.

Perianal Fistula Is usually seen in German Shephers, setters and retrievers, especially in dogs over 7 years old and who have skin problems.  A weak immune system or low thyroid hormone levels are linked to this condition.  Hair follicles and anal glands become contaminated by fecal material.  The infection must be treated promptly to prevent it from spreading.

Perineal Hernia refers to a hernia near the anus, seen most often in 6-8 year old unneutered male dogs.  Breeds most at risk are Boston Terriers, Boxers, Collies, Kelpies, Dachshunds, Old English Sheepdogs, Pekingese and Welsh Corgis.  Diagnosis is done by a rectal examination.

Rectal and Anorectal Narrowing (Strictures) are caused by scar tissue resulting from injury, trauma or inflammation.  German Shepherds, Beagles and Poodles are most prone to this problem.

Rectal Prolapse refers to rectal tissue protruding through the anal opening.  The dog will strain when going to the bathroom.  An incomplete rectal prolapse means that when the dog is passing a stool, some of the rectum's lining is visible, but only for a few minutes.

Rectal Tears happen when a dog is injured or swallows a sharp object.  This should be treated as soon as possible to avoid infection.  The tear needs to be stitched closed.

Rectal Tumors are often treated with surgery, if the cancer has not spread.  Symptoms are diarrhea, blood in the stool, pain when defecating and straining.

Early diagnosis is important since symptoms can be similar for both chronic but treatable conditions and for life-threatening ones.  Changing the diet will often be necessary.  If you have had success in treating your pet, please let us know.



Incomplete Rectal Prolapse Remedies  

Posted by Pauline (Colorado, USA) on 09/22/2014

Hello. I rescued a Pekingese 16 years ago. We have been blessed to have her this long. She has always had UTI, and bladder stones, as a young dog. I make homemade food for her, as 16 years ago, there was nothing available to feed her with out costing an arm and a leg, besides I give her the best food for her condition. Recently, she has come up with a condition called incomplete rectal prolapse. I'm not sure what to do? I cannot have surgery, as I feel she would not survive it. Her age and her short nose are tworeasons. Just wondering what I can do to make her comfortable? She gets apple cider in her food daily, that has helped her all these years control her UTIs. She eats and does her business daily, but the one inch protrusion must bother her. It does go back in after about 10 minutes. Anyone have any suggestions as to what I can do to help her? Thanks

Replied by Theresa
Mpls., Mn
09/23/2014

Hey Pauline!

I agree re: not wanting to put your senior through corrective surgery.

If the prolapse evenutally resolves after 10 minutes or so, tI see the main concern with keeping the tissue lubricated so it doesn't dry out; if it dries out then you open the tissue up for infection. You might consider applying a lubricant to the prolapsed tissue so that it doesn't dry out while it slowly returns to the correct position. It might mean your girl will need a wipe to dry off any extra lubricant when done, but I am sure having the tissue protected will kept keep the tissue healthy.

Replied by Julie
Toledo, Oh
10/30/2014

I have a dog who had the prolapse and didn't go back and had to go in and have a "drawstring" around his anus for 5 days to allow the tissues to become un-inflamed and relax. Then have the stitch removed. I have switched to Hill's Ideal Balance Grain Free Salmon. No irritation and no more occurrences and now he has a very silky coat. Good luck to you with yours.