Anal Gland Remedies for Cats and Dogs

Pumpkin
Posted by Kelly (Nashville, TN ) on 11/21/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Canned pumpkin (100% pure pumpkin) is a great cure for dog who must have their anal glands expressed due to impactions. Also, my two dogs take enzymes and herbs daily. The herbs smell (and most likely taste) really bad. I mix them in a few teaspoons of pumpkin and add a couple of drops of omega 3 and vitamin E and a drop or so of Agave nectar. No problem getting them to eat this.

Pumpkin
Posted by Kari (Oxnard, Ca) on 10/12/2008

I have not used it on a cat, however we have a cocker spaniel who weights about 20 pounds and we would mix the pumpkin with honey, as per our vet 1/4 cup 2 times a day. Good Luck


Pumpkin
Posted by Linda (Moncton, New Brunswick ) on 10/11/2008

Hello, my dear sweet old cat Murphy had an infected and impacted anal gland, the my golden. Have purchased 100% pumkin and started the dog on it. Had anyone tried it on a cat? If yes how much per day?

with thanks! Lg

Prunes
Posted by Brandie (St Louis, MO) on 09/10/2008

I just wanted to say that prunes are NOT related to raisins. Raisins are dried grapes, and the grape seed is what is toxic to dogs. Prunes are dried plums. Since plums have a large pit, before drying they remove that pit. I dont think there is any problem feeding a dog prunes. I'm not sure if you will see this, I noticed that it has been quite a while since you posted, but I thought I would tell you anyway.


Coconut and Coconut Oil
Posted by Elaine (Edmond, Oklahoma, USA) on 06/04/2008
5 out of 5 stars

My little chihuahua would yip whenever he would have a bowel movement. His stool was also hard and light in color and hard to pass. Thank God for this site it saved me a vet bill. I remembered reading about coconut oil for people. I went to the kitchen and got a small amount on my finger, pried his mouth open and smeared in his mouth. I thought he would really protest, but he seemed to like the taste. Sure enough the next day he had a very healthy bowel movement. It turned out he had a swollen anal gland. I put witch hazel and hydrogen peroxide on it. It ruptured, drain and his fine now. I LOVE THIS SITE!

Homeopathic Gunpowder 3x
Posted by Sue (Otago, New Zealand) on 05/14/2008

I also have a german shepherd with an anal fistula. It was the size of a pea and growing - opening fast. The vet put him on some over-the-counter drugs, (Very very Inexpensive) about $20 worth, and it closed up like magic. Since then he has been on a low dose of prednisone for about 2 years, I am now wanting to get him off that so have started weaning him very slowly and at the same time changing his diet to include coconut oil, kelp milled flaxseed, acv, yoghurt and a few other bits and bobs. So far so good. Every time I googled "Fistula" up popped thousands of sites on Crohns Disease in Humans. It appears to be very similar, so in the end I searched for natural cures regarding Crohns disease. If you want the name of the drugs I initially used to HALT and SHRINK the fistula, I will find out for you.


Raw Food Diet
Posted by Suzanne (Southeast, Michigan) on 04/27/2008
5 out of 5 stars

For those of you who have dogs with skin problems, skin allergies, anal gland issues, smelly coats, dirty or greasy feeling coat, smelly breath, please consider a raw diet. This is something that is becoming more well known and is growing in popularity. Commercial dog foods are the cause of so many health problems in pets. My dog had horrible anal gland problems(have you ever smelled anything so horrid?) Instead of having his anal glands extracted over and over, and for other health reasons that need to be addressed, I switched him to a raw diet. My three dogs and one cat have now been eating a raw diet for two years now. Raw meaty bones, some organ meat, and then a couple times a week, a few supplements like fish oil, yogurt, raw egg, kale. It's similar to something called the BARF diet for pets, but a simplified version. Two books by Tom Lonsdale, Raw Meaty Bones, and Work Wonders, are a good place to start reading about the diet. There are web sites and yahoogroups as well. There is a formula for percentage of meat/bones/organ, so it's important to read about the diet before jumping into it. It should also be a very gradual transition. My dogs teeth are super clean and white (even my 9yr old lab) because they're eating like their ancestors did; ripping the meat off bones, chomping on bone (raw bones only -- cooked bones are a choking hazard). Since starting this diet, besides being overall healthier pets, other benefits: clear anal glands because the poop is a bit harder, healthier skin and coat, no dog smell or doggy breath, much less poop because no fillers, etc., as in dry food I never have to clean up poop in my yard! Natural diet means natural poop; in a few days, it turns white and crumbles away. Also, my dogs are happier. They love the raw diet. I had one very stubborn cat who I just couldn't get to transition to a raw diet, so I fed her Evo, the more natural dry food. That did help her allergies, but I still would rather she went raw.

Coconut and Coconut Oil
Posted by Sue Ann (Beachwood, NJ) on 11/17/2006
5 out of 5 stars

I read an article in a natural dog publication I receive about giving a dog with anal gland iissues unsweetened coconut and coconut oil (both can be purchased at a health food store). The coconut bulks up the stool with fiber and the coconut oil softens the bulked up stool a bit. For a dog about 30 lbs., you work up to 1 teaspoon of the coconut oil, and work up to 2 teaspoons of the unsweetened coconut. The coconut has to be soaked in water until its wet so it can be digested more easily. I only began this remedy 2 weeks ago, but don't notice my dog "scooting" as much as he used to.


Pumpkin
Posted by Margaret (Worcester, MA) on 11/11/2006
5 out of 5 stars

feeding approximately 2 tablespoons canned 100% pure pumpkin 2X per day (for a dog weighing about 100 pounds). This cures anal sac impaction. My Rottweiler had anal sac problems from too soft stools and was in misery after eliminating. We had to take him several times to the vet for her to express the sacs- which he found rather unpleasant. She suggested we increase the fiber content of his diet and suggested we try the pumpkin. We started out with 1 tblsp/feeding (twice a day) and then upped it to 2 tblsp/feeding (twice a day) because of his size. He loves his pumpkin and has it every day. He has not had one bout of anal sac problems since we have started him on the pumpkin and this has been for almost 2 years now.

Pumpkin
Posted by Laynie (Lakewood, NJ) on 03/25/2008
5 out of 5 stars

I cannot even tell you how thrilled I am to have found the "pumpkin" cure for anal impaction! My dog, a small mixed breed, was at the point where I was taking her at least every two weeks to have her glands expressed! I started her on one teaspoon (she is small) of pumpkin mixed with her food and she has not had to have them expressed in over three months now!! It's a wonderful cure! If you haven't tried it, do so!! THANK you!!!

Homeopathic Gunpowder 3x
Posted by Dharma (Phoenix, Az) on 04/17/2007
5 out of 5 stars

Hi, About 20 years ago I spent thousands on antibiotics for my Borzoi's anal gland infection. I finally had a radionic analysis done and the homeopathic, Gunpowder 3x was prescribed. It can be highly antiseptic/antifungal. Since then I have seen that in animals if antibiotics do not work it is often fungal. For whatever reason gunpowder 3x has saved more than 1 animal from dangerous surgeries and amputation.

I do have a challenge I am working on and would like some advise if any have suggestions. What would you use for a deep anal fistula in a German Shepherd? What is generally used is an immune suppressant such as cyclosporin and it works well at close to $300 a month forcing many owners to have to make terrible choices and with cyclo it is evident that the animal feels awful and soon will begin to limp and become very weak. This is common in Shepherds and is quite a challenge.

I have tried the standards such as Silicea, Arnica Calc Sulph. Some temporary relief from Glyconutrients mixed with Three Lac but then it fights back and gets considerably worse. I thought primal defense or Ohira's would do it but not so.

Prunes
Posted by Cindy (Reese, MI) on 01/06/2008
5 out of 5 stars

A few years ago, German shepherd was very smelly and vet had to express his anal glands. After the 2nd trip to the vet in less than a year, plus the fact that the dog greatly dislikes going to the vet, did some research on Internet and found out someone recommended prunes. I give my 88 lb dog 2-3 prunes per day and have had absolutely no problems since. Was concerned that prunes might be in the same family as raisins (which are toxic to dogs) and possibly toxic but have not been able to find definite information. If there is a problem with giving dogs prunes, I would appreciate if someone would post something to that effect.


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