Manganese Cures and Side Effects

Bursitis



Posted by Denis (Luo Dong Township, Taiwan) on 05/12/2007
5 out of 5 stars

Some years ago I had a hair mineral analysis done. In general, the profile of minerals was on the low end of the normal range. However, copper was only about 85% of the minimum considered normal and manganese was only about 50%. I have severe food allergies and apparently the inflammation is interfering with normal mineral absorption. I have always been athletic and have more or less kept up a regular schedule of aerobic exercise for the last 38 years or so. One type of exercise I have had trouble doing is dips. Beginning in my late teens, whenever I started doing dips, I would get severe bursitis and have to quit. It was not until I was in my late forties that I had this hair mineral analysis done. I went to a local chemical shop and bought the purest form (high quality lab chemicals manufactured in Japan) of Manganese Chloride I could find. I began taking small quantities, only a few tiny crystals a day. Before long, for the first time in my life, I was able to do dips without getting bursitis. Now, caution is warranted. I knew I was low in manganese. However, it is a trace mineral, and too much can cause nervous system damage. After several years, I more or less forgot about it and my shoulder joints starting getting weak again. Two falls on two separate occasions resulted in dislocating both of my shoulders within the last year. Now, I am taking a little more, about 90 mg a day in order to strengthen my shoulder joints. I also have a very weak liver, and I suspect that manganese deficiency is a big part of this as well. If you want to try manganese chloride, first make sure you have a deficiency and then, take no more than 50 mg a day of the pure manganese, i.e. you must figure the weight of the choride and water molecules attached.