Borax for Fluoride Detox

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Ted (Bangkok, Thailand) on 02/01/2010:
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Borax was used to remove fluoride poisoning in a Rabbit study given toxic doses of fluoride. Boron is also a required mineral. The doses of boric acid (which is more toxic then borax) in the study quoted is estimated at doses of roughly 4.5 g to 4.90 grams/kg, would be equivalent of taking boric acid (which equivalent) in a typical 70 kg adult of 4.5x70 grams to 4.98 x 70 grams. The idea of fluoride removal using borax was based on a toxicity research on giving fluoride at toxic dose, rabbits fed on borax were protected from the fluoride poisoning. If there is difficulty in using fluoride or obtaining them, it's possible to eat tamarind which is also an good chelation agent of fluoride too, however, borax has a unique property in being less toxic then boric acid, and it's alkaline, but it's also a required mineral and normalizes hormone level. Different studies used higher LD50 on borax toxicity, but I used a much lower figures about 2 grams/kg, where the toxicity is equivalent to salt, which has a value roughly 2 grams/kg weight also. A chelation agent of mineral I can use humic acid, zeolite, or a mixture of humic acid and zeolite together also. However, humic acid interestingly enough lowers excitotoxicity (aspartate and glutamate) that's found high in ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease) and aspartame poisoning, found in many sugar free products, one interesting side effect is the desire to pee every 30 minutes or so throughout the day. It takes about 1-4 weeks to remove this extreme urinary urgency. Fluoride on the other hand has a suppressive effect, but both together cause (with aspartame) caused extreme sleeplessness and apathy at even low doses, found in fluoridation and fluoridated toothpaste. As to whether borax removes or chelate fluoride, the idea of chelation requires more chemical analysis at a molecular level, and i can't find a research study on that one. However, there is increase in fluoride excretion when borax for example, implying the removal of fluoride, and possibly chelation of fluoride. In which case the level of toxic reaction to fluoride is removed whenever fluoride is taken at toxic doses, and using the borax, for example, as the antidote. The idea of using borax is based on subacute doses of luoride poisoning, which is a common one given the excessive fluoride consumption, is based on this study:

Fluoride 1981; 14(1):21-29

Boron as antidote to fluoride: effect on bones and claws in subacute intoxication of rabbits

Elsair J, Merad R, Denine R, Azzouz M, Khelfat K, Hamrour M, Alamir B, Benali S, Reggabi M

Laboratories of Physiology, Toxicology and Galenic Pharmacy, Medical Institute, Algiers, Algeria

Summary: Rabbits were "subacutely" intoxicated by administration of 30 mg/kg/day of fluoride for 3 months followed by 15 mg/kg/day for a subsequent 3 months (F). Boron was given alone (B) as preventive and simultaneously with fluoride prophylactically (F + Bp), as well as therapeutically namely midway during the experimental period (F + Bpc) while fluoride was being administered and after it was discontinued (Bc compared with fluoirde interuption F*), at a constant F/B ratio. All groups were compared to normal controls.

Boron administered during fluoride intoxication or after its interruption, reduces fluoremia and increases urinary fluoride excretion. Skeletal fluoride levels are directly relatd to those of claws. They bear no relationship to fluoride in hair. The high fluoride content in bone in lot F decreases with addition of boron. It is still high in lot F* but returns to normal in loc Bc. Calcium content of bones remains normal in all lots. Posterior pad radiography shows a cortical thickness in lot F which is less pronounced in lots F + Bpc and F*, and returns to normal in lot Bc.
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If a person were to take very high amounts of fluoride, then you need a combination of other remedies including tamarind, and grinded seeds of tamarind, which is also used to detox fluoride in the environment, especially the tamarind seed powder, or possibly tamarind seed extract. Unfortunately tamarind is a food and is not a required mineral as in boron, so it's considered a fruit, but can also be used to remove fluoride. Tamarind is a common candy in Thailand and is easily available here and is used in preparing various food delicacy here in Thailand also. It's not possible to prove the chelation of fluoride per se, but researchers assume they do, and from a practical point of view, as a consumer, it reduces fluoride toxicity and subacute doses, and that I find it just fine for most applications.

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