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Bladder Infection Remedies for Dogs

Last Modified on Feb 10, 2016


Cinnamon and Yogurt  

Posted by Jim (Bellingham, Wa , Usa) on 11/24/2011

For UTI's give your dog Cinnamon mixed into some yogurt - we do a level teaspoon for our 45# female. As a preventative they have been getting this weekly and no issues and no more UTI's. And yes, it does work with people - adjust accordingly.


Cranberry  
3 User Reviews | 3 YEA

Posted by Shannon (Portland, Maine) on 12/01/2009

[YEA]  Cranberry and Cantharis for Dog urinary problems

If my Rottweiler mix eats birdseed, he inevitably will get a urinary tract infection. One Sunday, when the vet was closed we decided to try cranberry and cantharis and it was amazing! Worked even faster then the antibiotics prescribed by the vet. Firstly, if your dog likes the taste of cranberry jiuce, as mine does, give several 'doses' of unsweetened cranberry juice along with remedy. If not I am sure it will be effective in just pill form. Cantharis is available in most natural food stores as little blue pills. We gave our 110# dog 5 cantharis pills 3 times a day along with 2 cranberry pills. Cranberry pills come in different strengths so I would follow the directions on the bottle, but I think generally 1 pill for dogs under 75# and 2 pills for dogs over 75# should work. For cantheris, I would use a 1 pill per 20# ratio. We continued this treatment for one week after the first sign of blood in the urine and he had no issues. In fact, after the first dose and drink of juice, he was able to urinate within an hour and had a clear urine within about 3 hours. If your dog does not like cranberry juice, it is still important to encourage lots of fluid with this remedy, as the kidneys will need to be well hydrated for the acidity of the cranberry to flush the urinary tract.


Posted by Jan (W. Ma) on 09/27/2009

[YEA]  Cranberry extract (just a drop or two - it's potent stuff!) clears up urinary tract infections in humans and dogs (probably in cats also, but I've never tried).

Humans: dilute two drops in 8 oz. of water and drink. Use twice a day until gone (usually within 36 hours). Or just drink diluted regular cranberry juice, sugar-free.

Dogs: dilute one or two drops (depending on size of dogs) in water and squirt down throat with a medicine syringe. Use twice a day until gone (usually within 36 hours).


Posted by Tammie (Titusville, FL/USA) on 10/21/2008

[YEA]  I was told by my vet that I could use cranberry pills (1, once a day) as a way to prevent UTI's from re-occuring. I have tried this and it seems to work, but I would like to know what you think about this natural remedy and in what doses you might suggest. I'm thinking that after the dog is treated with vinegar to get rid of a UTI, then preventative measures are ok with the cranberry. However, if using vinegar as a preventative works too (and it's cheaper), what would be the recommended dosage for that?

I am SO glad I found this site! My lab mix (age 13) gets UTI's often (like right now!), and vinegar we can do! :) Do you recommend the vinegar remedy for UTI's to be done for a full 2 weeks or what?

THANK YOU!


Cranberry Capsules  
1 User Reviews | 1 YEA

Posted by Monica (Reseda, California) on 03/01/2012

[YEA]  I tried apple cider vinegar on my 2 1/2 year old male cat, Benzi and it worked for a while but it was a strugle to get him to swallow it and, the moment I stopped giving it to him the infection would come back in a couple days. I found this cranberry capsules that treat UTI's in humans and have been diluting 2 capsules in 1 oz of distilled water and have been giving it to him twice a day for 2 weeks now and no sign of UTI's! Not to mention he doesn't mind the taste of it at all. I highly recommend them. I had taken him to the vet back in January and spent 700.00 dollars on a flush and antibiotics and diet food. A few days later he was sick again, so for those that say take him to the vet right away, unless you can afford 1000.00 dollars every vet visit, try alternative natural remedies, They Work!


Cream of Tartar  
1 User Reviews | 1 YEA

Posted by Lisa (Kaplan, USA) on 08/19/2008

[YEA]  I use a teaspoon of cream of tartar in my dogs water every day for about a week and UTI'S are usually gone, say goodbye to ugly vet bills , at least for this problem.


D-Mannose  
4 User Reviews | 2 YEA

Posted by Monroe444 (British Columbia, CA) on 04/10/2014

I was wondering what you mean by natural antibiotics - do you mean colloidal or ionic silver water? I was thinking about giving my dog colloidal silver for her UTI but decided against it because it's still an antibiotic, and I figure that if I disturb her gut flora it will just lead to more UTIs in the future, so I'm going to stick with D-mannose powder and cranberry capsules for now. I don't think her UTI is severe though, so maybe if it were I would do the silver. But if there is something else out there, I would love to hear about it.

I am also giving her herbs for Cushing's (the ones from Adrenal Harmony Gold) and have just added some more for her kidneys that are listed in some UTI formulas like stone root and oregon grape root.

Does anyone know anything about using human UTI test strips for dogs so I don't have to keep going back to the vets? Human test strips are so much less expensive than dog test strips - $13 for 10 as opposed to $40 for 2.

Replied by Theresa Donate

Mpls., Mn
04/10/2014
Hey Monroe444!

It appears the post you replied to is from last year; not sure if the poster will answer about the natural antibiotics - I hope they do!

I did research into using human UTI test strips for dogs, and it appears the ones used for dogs are the exact same ones used in humans - so yes, you can save money and buy the human test strips for your dog.


Posted by Jody (British Columbia, Canada) on 07/04/2010

[YEA]  My 3 year old female St. Bernard has had three UTI's. Getting a urine sample from a St. Bernard is not easy to say the least:) The one before her present one I had tried the ACV and yogurt, unfortunately to no avail and had to resort to a vet visit and antibiotics. Two weeks ago I noticed her frequent urination again and went out and bought D-Mannose, which I had read great reviews about. WOW! In one to two days her urination was back to normal. I've given her one 500mg pill (opened in her food) three times a day since and was just researching when to decrease that dose. I may put her on one pill for maintenance now. It's really worth a try for all the damage antibiotics can do to animals and people (although yes, they do have their place in many instances:)


Posted by Jan (Seattle, Wa) on 01/07/2009

[YEA]  D-Mannose powder (simple sugar) eliminates urinary tract infection quickly (24-48 hours) and safely by causing the bacteria to be flushed right out of the body with normal urination. D-Mannose is easy to buy, your local Health Food store has it.

It is a shame and unforgivable that doctors are not recommending this product - to people and to pets! I have small 16 years old dog, the dosage I use - 1/2 teaspoon with a little of her favorite treats crumbled in it - 3 times for only 1 to 2 days, and the infection is gone! (No more blood in urine, no rotten smell.) It works like a magic for people and pets! No antibiotic needed!


Dietary Changes  
7 User Reviews | 1 YEA | 1 WARNING!

Posted by Rosanna (Illinois, US) on 02/06/2015

[YEA]  GRAIN DIETS are the biggest problem and create UTIs. Get off of grains!!


Posted by Lucy (Iowa) on 06/06/2014

My dog is peeing all the time every few minutes see her squat..vet put her on amoxi pills for 2 weeks but still squatting all the time. doesnt seem to hurt and no dicolored urine. I am going to try some of the natural remedies I have seen on this page bur I am wondering if the food I have my older dog on is causing the problem. I switched a couple months ago to a no grain diet as 1 of my dogs seizures were becoming more frequent and this seems to have helped her, however the 1 with the bladder infection sneaks into this food dish and eats it as well as her own. So now wondering if this is the cause.?????

Replied by Theresa Donate

Mpls., Mn
06/06/2014
Hey Lucy!

What food are you feeding your older dog? What food are you feeding your younger dog with the UTI? Without knowing what you are feeding I cannot comment on the diet being the cause of the bladder infection.

That said, Ted from Bangkok suggests sea salt for a UTI:

Ted from Bangkok, Thailand: "Sea salt added to the dog's drinking water, 1 teaspoon per liter of water should reduce the UTIs if taken for 1-2 days; then a maintenance dose of 1/4 teaspoon per liter of water of sea salt should be fine. If it is not working then I would likely add some cranberry juice to the water instead of just plain water with sea salt."

If your dog won't take the sea salted water, you can hide the dry salt in the middle of a wad of cheese or in soft canned food - but break the dose up into one half teaspoon doses if you go this route.


Posted by Christine (San Jose, Ca) on 11/14/2011

Hi, all. My 20 lb. Cavalier King Charles developed frequent UTI's. Every time I took her in (which stressed her because she knew she'd, once again, be poked and prodded) the vet would charge see her for 2 minutes, diagnose what I already knew (UTI), prescribe the antibiotic, Clavamox (which can cause a host of other issues, the least among them is a yeast infection), and charge me a huge amount of money. She would also insist on sporadic blood tests, withholding the Clavamox until I conceded. I got REAL tired of this CHIRADE, went to Pet Food Express, obtained the advice from one of their clerks who suggested more protein (she was only on dry kibble - not good for dogs to begin with), and I soon began to giver her ~ 2 TBSP of raw hamburger per day. She hasn't had a UTI since. She's happy and loves, loves, loves the hamburger!! :-)
I may also giver her natural, unsweetened yogurt with probiotics too.

P.S. Anyone who opposes natural remedies is clueless. We should only go to a vet as a last resort. Thanks (! ) to the person who began this site, and thanks so much to all of its contributors!!!!


Posted by Bex (Riley Twp., Usa) on 02/23/2011

[WARNING!]  While natural remedies are my first option we all must take a look at what foods we are feeding our pets. The dyes, genetically modified corn, fillers and by products cause many many issues with our beloved friends. The food you feed may very well cause diabetes, uti's tumors etc. Be aware of what you feed...


Posted by Mollie (Cambridge, Ma) on 01/23/2011

I just posted a message regarding my male cat with a urinary tract infection. I said that I now give my cats canned cat food twice a day and mix 1/4 cup distilled water in each bowl. I don't generally measure the water and when I checked today, I see that I mix a little less than 1/4 cup water into each bowl of canned cat food.


General Feedback  

Posted by Lm (Pa) on 05/18/2015

As a vet tech for 15 years who has finally seen the light, anyone depending on commercially prepared "prescription" diets is simply maintaining a medical condition with a band-aid, not curing a problem. Look into species-appropriate diets and cure your pets that way - with real, fresh food, antioxidants and some herbs that in most cases can get them OFF expensive diets and medications, and actually stop the condition. Conventional vets make a large portion of their income selling these diets, and keeping clients coming back - not because they see themselves doing anything wrong, but simply because this is what gets taught in vet school. Vets receive intentionally little true nutritional information in as far as preventing disease, a plan promoted by the pet food industry. Prescriptions, and prescription diets, are a business model taught in school that is beneficial to the practice, but not actually to the business. Do the research and learn that these diets are not the way to keep your pets healthy. Try Dr. Karen Becker's website, and any other holistic sites, for a lot of comprehensive information on how to alleviate long-term conditions through correct diet.

As for the main topic about UTIs, treating one UTI with some of the above mentioned remedies can be fine if the only symptom is frequent or smelly urination, but if there is not a quick response, there are other symptoms, or there is recurrence, diagnosis is essential to determine the cause of the urination. My general attack is to list the symptoms, decide if it seems like an isolated problem or could be a more involved one, and treat at home for a few days as long as there is improvement, and not an increase in severity or number of symptoms. This does require a good degree of knowledge sometimes, to make these decisions though. So my best recommendation is for those who feel confident in being able to make the determination from when frequent urination goes from something treatable at home to something that needs diagnosis, try it if you like, but get vet attention if there is not speedy response. For those who do not feel qualified to make that decision for their pets, find a holistic vet. Then you can have your diagnosis, and still get to use the healthier home remedies without the guilt trip that many conventional vets will lay on you for even considering it.



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