Gnat Bite Remedies

Last Modified on Jun 19, 2014

Found anywhere in the world, gnats are actually tiny flies. Small, long-legged, flying insects, gnats are often so miniscule they are difficult to detect. As they feed on the blood of warm-blooded animals to survive, gnats frequently bite unsuspecting individuals. As gnats are so small and hard to detect, these insects often bite individuals without them even knowing; however following the bite, a noticeable mark will appear.

Gnat bites generally swell at least slightly. Bites and the surround area are also typically itchy and sometimes even painful. The initial bite area often even has a small bit of blood coming from the bite where a gnat has been feeding. In extreme cases, individuals experience a slight heat or feverish feeling in bitten areas. While not common, some individuals are allergic to gnat bites and have an allergic reaction. An allergic reaction includes additional symptoms as a typical bite such as a general sick feeling, difficulty breathing and hives.



Gnat bites are a result of the insect’s natural feeding habits. A gnat bites a warm-blooded animal to drink the blood. When done feeding, the gnat spits an anticoagulant into the bite, which is actually what causes the associated stinging and itching.

Natural Gnat Bite Prevention and Remedies

The best way to avoid uncomfortable and itchy gnat bites is by preventing them using natural methods. Essential oils work especially well as natural repellents. Spearmint, peppermint, geranium and eucalyptus globulus essential oils work the best. Basil and cedar are also effective gnat repellents. Natural methods also work well for treating bites. Oil of cloves and rubbing alcohol applied directly to the site of the bites treat itching and prevent further issues.

Print Print

User Reviews





Oil of Cloves   1  0   

Posted by Brenda (San Diego, Ca)

[YEA]  For No-see-ums in the ears, be sure to dilute a concentrated solution of oil of cloves, since it will cause your skin to peel. Start out with a very small diluted amount and work up a little at a time until no-see-ums are gone.

Posted by Carol And Harold
Cleveland, Ohio
12/08/2012
I read these no-see-ums are attracted to particular scents like mildew, mold and especially fungus. They can also be found in soil near garbage.

Residual pesticides are substances in micro crystal form that when dried, remain present and kill on contact or shortly after. The most effective pesticide for these things is Deltamethrin. It can be bought online and it totally works! Its not as toxic as you might think for a commercial grade pesticide. So far its not proven to be carcinogenic.

Diatomatious earth is good for some surface areas however these things hide on walls or under shelves near kitchen trash cans or bathroom walls.

However a simple less toxic way to eliminate them was to spray adheasive spray in places they hide. There are 5 dead ones stuck to the kitchen ceiling near the trash area and near the light bulb in the bathroom. They come out at night more than day. I also sprayed around my bed, the adjacent walls and ceiling, under and around the computer desk. Sometimes I wear a knit hat to bed.

It has been documented that occasionally these things can lay eggs in human skin. This may contribute to a variety of similar ailments classified as Morgellons. Ivermectin may not be as effecive as Mebendazole as I have tried them both. I just finished my last Mebendazole last night and have mild flue like symptoms. Still feel crawling on the scalp but not under the skin as before.

They were attracted to the fungus in my scalp. They layed eggs and I could feel larva moving under the skin. I thought it was scabies and treated as such. OVer time nothing seemed to work. Oils, vasiline suffer and pine oil did not do a thing to effect these things that are in the scalp. Not even staying under water for 2.5 hours. Permetherin worked for a day. I noticed these gnats landing on my head and at one point relieved, hoping that was the cause of feeling things crawling in my scalp - thinking it was harmless. One day I put hair gel thickly on my scalp. While it was stil wet, I felt something and wiped with toilet paper and found a freshly dead gnat. Only then did things start to make sense.

I am still suffering with this in my scalp but things are very slowly getting better. I am going back to using neem oil. I do think I also have mites in my scalp as at one point I could feel them crawling on my face and ears. Bleach, borax and epsom salt has eliminated 95% as now.

Rubbing Alcohol   1  0   

Posted by Mike (Evansville, IN) on 08/01/2006

[YEA]  Rubbing alcohol, applied liberally helped stop biting midges or no-see-ums. They [no-see-ums] get in your nose and bite on the inside of your sinus passage.

Posted by Ivory Coast
Loco, Ca
01/17/2010
10 Posts
I AM HAVING A LOT OF TROUBLE WITH GNATS NOT TO MENTION FLEAS AND SCABIES. I'VE BEEN USING DE AND THERE WAS A LOT OF DUST ON THE OVEN SO I BEGAN TO CLEAN IT OFF. MUCH TO MY SURPRISE I FOUND TONS OF DEAD BUGS IN THE VENTS AND INSIDE THE FRONT PANEL ON THE OVEN DOOR. SO I CLEANED TONS OF THEM OUT. I NEVER WOULD HAVE THOUGHT OF GNATS, AND THESE LITTLE BLACK ROUND THINGS BEING IN THERE. THOSE LITTLE BLACK THINGS ARE EVERY WHERE. THEY COME OUT OF AN ELECTRICAL OUTLET IN THE KITCHEN. I PLUGGED ONE OF THOSE R_ _ _ X P_ _ S THINGS IN THE OUTLET NOW THEY ARE IN THE OTHER OUTLET TOO. THE OVEN INSIDE IS QUITE CLEAN BUT I AM RUNNING THE SELF CLEANING THING FOR 4 HOURS ANYWAY.

THEY DO INDEED LIKE A BOWL OF RED WINE AND AND DAWN DISHWASHING LIQUID MIXED. THEY SEEM TO LIKE A BOWL OF COFFEE WITH APPLE JUICE, APPLE CIDER, MANGO OR BANANA PEEL AND DAWN DISHWASHING LIQUID.

AFTER I FINISH VACCUMING AND CLEANING UP A BIT I WILL SPRAY BOMB WITH SIPHOTROL. I BELIEVE THIS IS THE CHEMICAL NAME NOT SURE BUT IT HAS PEMITHERIN AND PRECOR IN IT.







 



DISCLAIMER: Our readers offer information and opinions on Earth Clinic, not as a substitute for professional medical prevention, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with your physician, pharmacist, or health care provider before taking any home remedies or supplements or following any treatment suggested by anyone on this site. Only your health care provider, personal physician, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for your unique needs or diagnose your particular medical history.

Copyright © 2014 | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | About Us | Contact Us | Search