Dog Yeast Infection Treatment: Home Remedies for Pets: Q&A

Last Modified on May 27, 2012

Puppy with Yeast Infection

05/27/2012: Zoeysmom from West Jordan, Utah: "I think my 7 month old female border collie/lab mix puppy has a vaginal yeast infection. When we first adopted her we noticed she had a certain smell, but thought it would go away with a few baths or after she was fixed; thought maybe she got it from the humane society we adopted her from. Now she also has discharge with a smell and sometimes she frequently urinates though not every time I let her out. I don't have the money to take her to the vet just yet I have to save up so I would appreciate anyone's feedback on the matter maybe there is a remedy at home I can use?????"

Dog with Chronic Yeast Infection

08/29/2008: Emily from Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island: "Quincy is a 7 year old lab/rotty/husky mix. My vet has told us that he has a yeast infection in his ears.
I've read and tried the ACV stuff, but it only appears to be getting worse. I've also noticed that he has delveloped raw bumps on his front paws, I tried aloe vera on those, and it seems to be helping. He's also been really down and sad lately, due to some extreme renovations going on at my house, he's completely out of his norm. But his ears aren't getting any better. If anything, they're getting worse. I've noticed that by spraying a 50/50 mix of ACV and water on his skin, he hasn't been scratching near as much, but I need help with his ears. I've had him at the vet many times, and he's been on many different meds, and none of them helped. He's allergic to the only med that seemed to have helped at all. Please, help. I don't think I could bear to put him to sleep."

09/05/2010: Sophie from Houston, Tx replies: "Have you looked into systemic yeast infections or leaky gut syndrome? I think my dog has it so, we are off to the vet. Mine stinks under his legs (like rotten cheese) and has these little black spots and bald spots. He was a rescue and I too can not bear to put him down. I think it can be fixed with diet as long as he doesn't have thyroid problems. He has had this for 2 years now. He's not depressed, but itches like mad. Good luck with your baby! :("
09/06/2010: Linda from York County, Maine replies: "09/06/2010: Linda from York County, Maine writes: "Hi Emily - my family enjoyed the company of a Yellow Lab mix for 13 years. She was my 'problem child' with chronic skin problems... Scratching and biting and shaking her head consumed more of her life than was necessary; her aroma was not pleasing at all - some of her skin was black with what the vet called 'saliva stain'; her ears were smelly, itchy, red and almost hot to the touch. Poor thing went through the anti-biotic/steroid scene for years..... Finally, I began feeding her a grain free dry food which made a HUGE difference and I added home cooked protein nightly...... Just a thought. Good luck ~ Linda"

[YEA 02/12/2007: Wendy from Brooklyn, NY writes: "Years of constant sinus infections led me to many doctors and I was told to get surgery, which didn't help a lot. Finally an allergist suggested I cut out wheat; and it has been amazing! Though I still occasionally have a sinus flare-up it's been a HUGE difference and I now think that I didn't have as many infections as I thought, that I was having allergic reactions to wheat! I would advise anyone considering sinus surgery to try this first. I would not have gotten the surgery had I known. "

09/06/2010: Linda from York County, Maine writes: "Hi Emily - my family enjoyed the company of a Yellow Lab mix for 13 years. She was my 'problem child' with chronic skin problems... Scratching and biting and shaking her head consumed more of her life than was necessary; her aroma was not pleasing at all - some of her skin was black with what the vet called 'saliva stain'; her ears were smelly, itchy, red and almost hot to the touch. Poor thing went through the anti-biotic/steroid scene for years..... Finally, I began feeding her a grain free dry food which made a HUGE difference and I added home cooked protein nightly...... Just a thought. Good luck ~ Linda""
06/06/2011: Ahartnoll from Melbourne, Fl, Usa replies: "Check out these links for info on Yeast Infections and how to get rid of them:

http://www.thewholedog.org/ArtYeast.html

http://www.greatdanelady.com/articles/systemic_yeast_mini_course.htm

http://67.192.62.47/pc/articles.asp?article_id=53&type=9&condition_id=&product_id=&panel=0

http://67.192.62.47/pc/articles.asp?article_id=63&type=9&condition_id=&product_id=&panel=5

Hope that helps, Alice"

08/06/2011: Rene from Arvada, Co replies: "I have followed some of these forums for the past year. That is how long I have been trying to find a cure for my Cocker Spaniel's skin yeast infections. I have worked with a vet and we have tried several antibiotics, medicated shamoos and topical creams without any progress. I tried all of the home remedies- like the vinegar rinses, yogart, without any positive results.

I change her diet from bag food to home prepared food, and while this did not help the skin condition, I was amazed at how it did improve her overall heath. She has lost about 5lbs and is much more agile, playful and energetic.

Finally, in dispair I took her to another vet who prescribed a new antibiotic called Simplicef. It is a 100 mg tablet taken once a day with meal. She has been on it for 12 days now of a three week treatment and I am extremely joyful to say there is no sign of the yeast infections. This antibotic is also friendly to the digestive system of my dog. The only one that has been.

Is she cured? I don't know. I hope so, but only time will tell if it comes back. But this is the first time in a year that I have hope.

If your dog is suffering with Skin yeast infections ask your vet about this drug."

11/06/2011: Anonymous Yorkie from Los Angeles, Ca replies: "My yorkie has had serious skin problems for the past couple years. Think horrible smell, flaking, hair loss, and these persistent bumps on his skin that would ooze pus when they got bad enough. I've visited a few vets who have prescribed antibiotics, antifungals, and steroids for the itching. Trust me, it was bad. As soon as the meds ran out, the problems returned within a week. I was afraid of the side effects if I kept him on the pills so I tried the vinegar and yogurt remedies to no avail. Some medicated shampoos worked but only if used daily and the results wore off over time.

Recently I found my grandmother's stash of powdered sulfur, which I've heard is very good for your skin (in Asia sulfur springs are quite popular). It worked amazingly. Mix about a spoonful in a bowl of boiled water and wait for it to cool a bit (my dog is 6 lbs so adjust sulfur and water levels accordingly). Wet your dog and work the sulfur water into the skin (process will be easier if you shave, or at least shorten, your dog's hair). Place your dog in a bucket of regular water and just let him sit there for 15 minutes. Then rinse off thoroughly and dry your doggie. There will likely be some yellowing of the skin for a few days but you know you'd adore your dog even if he were green.

After a few days, my yorkie's skin and hair got all smooth and silky. Now I control his skin with a sulfur bath about once a month. The rest of the time I just wash him in medicated shampoo once a week. Now for one last note: yes, your dog will smell like he's been burnt (in the sulfur pits of hell). Let's face it though, I'd rather have an energetic little hellhound than a miserable, itchy, medicated, balding, yeasty-smelling dog. I personally think the smell is much improved in comparison."

02/15/2012: Bam from Brooklawn, Nj replies: "My chocolate lab Kaylee is 6yrs old. She has had various infections for years caused by allergies. She had allergy testing done. She was on antibiotics and steroids for ear infections, urinary tract infections and infections of the skin. In the past year she is having yeast infections. We have tried antifungal meds and shampoo. And they work great BUT the yeast comes back. She now has an eye infection. She has been on a high quality grain free diet. I started giving her yogurt, probiotics and I am about to try the apple cider vinegar. This has been years of turmoil. Kaylee also has a thyroid problem and seizures. Her seizures are managed and she is on the thyroid med (soloxine) I think the years of "not knowing" and treating her with antibiotics has created an even bigger problem. I believe she has systemic yeast and I am trying my best to treat her. She is loving. An energetic lab that acts as though she hasn't a care in the world. What a good nature. I am curious to hear of other people who have gone through the same with their animals. I am going to research more treatments and may even see a homeopathic vet. This is tough!"
11/12/2013: Mario Marini from Cleveland Oh replies: "I feel for everyone writing their struggles. This is such a difficult life to endure. We try all sorts of things to fix our dogs, rarely anything works. I spend so much mental time and money on trying to solve this problem.

I rescued a pit bull from LA that experienced horrific conditions for a year. He is a wonderful dog, but these paws, sore and swollen have me at my wits end. It's manageable, buts it. Nothing has worked. Most things make it worse. To be honest, many of you seem to have much more difficult situations. I pray that you stay strong and discover something.

I have heard of this issues as a child. I think it's too much breeding, too many dogs. I know two things, I'll continue to fight for Reggie, my dog, but I will never adopt, buy or accept a purebred dog again. Good luck to all of you."

ACV and Yogurt Questions for Yeast Issues in Dog

06/23/2008: Bari from Staten Island, New York: "I just found this site while searching for holistic treatments for yeast in dogs. I have a 14 year old shitzu who for the most part is healthy but has terrible skin, ear and eye problems caused by yeast. She's been on prescribed medications but nothing helps for long. What I've been reading about apple cider vinegar and or yogurt sounds promising but I'm not sure how to use either. How much yogurt do you give the dog and is the vinegar used internally or externally and in what amounts? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. The dog is suffering and we can't stand the smell!!"

06/24/2008: Joyce from Joelton, Tn replies: "Hi Bari with the sick Shih tz(or however you spell that)- On the apple cider vinegar, I would start by adding l tsp. to the drinking water and if she doesn't balk at drinking it, add 1/2 tsp. daily up to maybe a total of 3 tsp. On the yogurt, I'd give her plain, non-fat, unflavored & unsugared, as much as she wants to eat - start with a tsp. or two - until you find out if she will eat it. You can also bathe her in half water/half ACV but be very careful not to get it in her eyes - it stings or burns when you get it in your eyes."
06/25/2008: Ted from Bangkok, Thailand replies: "For dogs, especially the smell can be reduce almost overnight with borax and hydrogen peroxide bath first, unrinsed. The dog will naturally lick off some of the borax and it will have a killing effect on the yeast infection. However, in a liter of drinking water 1/4 teaspoon of sea salt is added plus 1/8 teaspoon of borax for only 1-3 days. Thereafter, only a 1/4 teaspoon of sea salt is added into the drinking water.

The borax and hydrogen peroxide goes like this: In a hydrogen peroxide 1% solution of one liter for example, I will add one tablespoon of borax and stir it and apply on the dog throughout. This is applied everyday for a week.

Most of the smell should go away by the second week.

One other the reason why most domesticated dogs and cats have diseases is the problem of industrialized farming practices which induces omega 3 deficiency in all farm animals raised on grains instead of grasses, a practice that is popular in the U.S. Therefore one capsule of fish oil omega 3 is added to the dog for about 5 days, plus domesticated, dogs, cats (and humans!) typically have very low diets in bicarbonates. Therefore a more ideal drinking water for dogs and cats (and humans!) is:

1/4 teaspoon of sea salt, 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda, in 1 - 1.5 liter of drinking water.

As to whether apple cider vinegar and yogurt will help, it might, but some animals may be lactic acid intolerant, such as cows and horses. However, if fed to dog, typically 1/2 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar is added into food or water. As for yogurt, it's between 1/2 tablespoon to 1 talbespoon of yogurt. My guess is apple cider may work a little better han yogurt, but I prefer to deal the problem through baking soda, omega 3 fish oil, and the hydrogen peroxide and borax remedy."
09/27/2009: Helene from Wetumpka, Alabama replies: "what do you do for the eyes? i did the borax & peroxide for my 60lb dog and it is working great on his coat. but i don't know what to do for his eyes. can you help me please. thank you Helene"

Dog with Yeast Infection on the Neck

06/23/2008: Stacey from Bellefontaine, Ohio: "my dog has been itching and has lost her hair under her neck when i woke up this smorning she had a knot on her neck that was hard and full of puss i asked the humane society what it was forsure and they told me that it was yeast infection on the neck i dont know what to use at home to get rid of this and was wondering if any one can help me i dont have anymoney to take her to the vet. so my mom told me that she had my dad squeeze it out of her dog when she had it but im afraid i'll hurt her.."

10/22/2010: Amanda from Dade City, Florida, Usa replies: "Well for a long time now my sister has a German Shepard mix and he has a nasty nasty yeast infection. After coming across this website and seeing how Apple Cider Vinegar and White Vinegar cures this on the skin I am also going to go buy her some plain yogurt and some Acidophilus pills for Joe Bobby and we are going to see how this works. We have tried everything at this point and nothing has seemed to work, so we are going to get on the ball with these remedies. The poor poor dog has very itchy, dry and an awful smell, kind of smells like hot fritos it's awful!! We love him and he is older so I am hoping some of this works. She feeds him very expensive dog food that doesn't have corn in it or potato because both of those are bad for dogs. I will keep you all posted on how Joe Bobby is doing."
11/02/2010: Jb from Atlanta, Ga Usa replies: "Organic extra virgin coconut oil is antifungal, antibacterial antiviral, rub some on spot & add some to food. Also try a probiotic that has more than one bacteria."
11/10/2010: Dr Know from Ny, Usa replies: "Try iodine tincture or an iodine spray. Iodine is well known for killing yeast based infections."
01/29/2011: Sandy from Roanoke, Virginia replies: "First thing to do is CHANGE YOUR DOG FOOD. My bulldog has had yeast in ears tailpocket on pads of feet in between pads of feet hair loss and blackened skin and such. When I changed her food it has made all the difference. I put antifungals on her tailpocket and pads of feet and back. Things like gyna lotrimin or tinactin can be used. I put my dog on Halo and its made a huge difference. Cut out all people food, check canned food labels, check treat labels for yeast promoters."

Remedies Needed for Yeast Infection in Dog

05/04/2008: Laura Ann from Long Valley, NJ: "my dog is allergic to Epi-Otic so I NEED a good wash, and ear/yeast infections cure. I ilke the idea of ACV to treat it. How much ACV do I use, is there a good wash that I can use to keep her ears clean? She is a 1 year old Haveses (12 lbs). homecooked for (trying to switch to raw but she won't eat it). no veggies except sprouts, meat med/rare, no graing/starches. She is on missing link joint support vitamins (she has MLP). Help! We have been fighting this ear thing for over 5 months, and now with spring her paws are driving her nuts too!"

05/24/2008: Gina from Iuka, Mississippi replies: "Our yorkie also had a yeast problem in his ears. I used an over the counter yeast cream (the kind women use for yeast) rubbing it in the ears for seven to ten days. After that to keep it in control use half water half white vineger in ears at bath time. It might also help to give your baby a tablespoon of yogart for a treat or in his meal. Hope this helps!"
09/24/2012: Wren from Newport, RI replies: "I have a 10 year old pug who at 8 became unbearable with yeast issues. Ears, under arm, neck and stomach all were affected and he ended up loosing all his hair underneath. It was hard to live with because he smelled so bad and iched all night long. I tried: Benadryl, ACV, tea tree oil, yoghurt, coconut oil, olive oil, liquid lethecin, Vit E, avacado and nothing even touched it. The vet precribed a steriod that did work but I didn't want him to stay on it for longterm. Then a miricle happened, my neighbor watched him for a couple weeks and gave him purified water and added an acidophilus pill sprinkled on his food(wheat, corn and soy free). We are now 9 months into this routine and all his hair is back the smell is gone. Still regular cleaning with his ears but that is a breed issue. No one is our house drinks the water from the tap any longer."
09/26/2012: Diamond from Salisbury, Ma. replies: "Wren from digby; I generally use sea salt with spring water for infections but I wouldn't agree with giving salt to animals. Thats some thing needing to find more answers on. But it works great on humans. The greatest cures is ACV, honey and cinnimon cures most illnesses."

Zinc and Copper Chloride

02/18/2008: R from FL: "My dog has a yeast infeciton and Ted says to use zinc and copper chloride. I have been everywhere and no one even knows what I am talking about. Where do you get it and what is the cost and how soon can I get it."

Ted from Bangkok, Thailand replies: "I used zinc chloride 1% and copper chloride 1% for external use in the skin area. However, this has limited use for external only to deal with skin problems.

However, I would much prefer the saturated borax in 1% H2O2 solution. However, the reason for the mentioned was that I once came into a nasty fungus infection that required a stronger solution. If you are observant and read the labels in some supplements for human uses, they actually add copper chloride, or even cupric oxide and chromium chloride in Kirkland Multivitamins

For yeast infection in dogs, if the dog is to take it internally, the best remedy is to add 1/4 teaspoon of borax, 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda and additional 1/4 teaspoon of sodium carbonate (washing soda) in one liter of drinking water. This is a rather mild remedy at least for my dog, I will let him take it for about 1-2 weeks to start seeing improvements.

A dog should also stop eating dog pellets and eat boiled chicken and meat (never overcooked, partially uncooked is best). Certain ingredients added into processed dog food might also cause yeast infection. If the dog is fed homecooked partially boiled meats, it should help the dog recover faster. No milk should be given. Milk is an antinutrients and the milk proteins covers whatever food the dog eats, preventing digestion. This is why milk is used in the even of food poisoning. Other anti-nutrients are burned toasts and white eggs. Albumin in white eggs are anti-nutrients because they bind to many nutrients preventing absorption."

TROUBLE LOCATING TED'S REMEDIES

09/05/2007: Harold from Shreveport, Louisiana: "I've read the post about using Copper Chloride, Zinc Chloride and ACV for curing yeast infection on dogs skin but I am having a time finding these two chemicals locally. Do you have a suggestion as to where I might look. I've tried local farm supplies and even pharmacies."

Ted from Bangkok, Thailand replies: "A yeast infections in dogs, if supplies can't be found is just to switch the dog to eating fresh partially uncooked meats and liver. A packaged dog food can be high in fungus count as a result of long term storage. The drinking water should add 1 teaspoon of baking soda in one liter so that the dog has proper alkalinity so that the yeast infections becomes reduced. Many dog foods add excess crude fat, which are not helpful yeast infections, therefore lean meats and liver are more preferable. Pork and Chicken meat is acceptable also, but it should be prepared at home so that the nutrients of the food is still there."

Skin Infection

03/09/2007: Paula : "My dog has had a yeast infection on skin for several years. Not sure if it is systemic fungal problem. He is now on Atopica for suppressing his immune system not much better than the antibiotics and steroid shots pushed by the vet. I wanted to try the solution of 1% copper chloride, 1% zinc chloride and 20% vinegar. Can't find where to purchase the copper and zinc compounds. The chemical companies only sell in bulk and I have only one pharmacy in the area that does compounding and they are going to check to see if they can get it for me. Do you have any suggestion on where to purchase? He is eating holistic dog food by Solidgold Gold n' Flocken but I may talk to butcher and see about getting him scraps of chicken, pork and liver which is very cheap. My poor dog get such smelly, black crust on his tail, butt, and inner thighs so bad but it does show up also on the rest of his body and around mouth but not as bad. During allergy testing (by blood) he was determined to be allergic to grass and trees but that wouldn't account for the outbreaks in the winter."

Ted from Bangkok, Thailand replies: "Dear Paula: In case you can't find it try another option. This one is bit easier to find. Apply a saturated solution of borax to the dog's skin. One tablespoon of borax per liter of water plus one tablespoon of baking soda and wash it. The dog may lick it also, but this is acceptable and this will also resolve the yeast infection. You can also add 1% hydrogen peroxide plus a couple of drops (5-10 drops per liter of water) of iodine in combination. Iodine will prevent yeast from sticking to the skin. Yeast is a bit harder to kill, so when washing the dog or applying it, do not rinse. The dog may lick it, but it won't hurt the dog. It is a bit harder to kill than the dog mange. Also added to the drinking water is 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda plus 1/8 teaspoon of borax per liter of water to the dog's drinking water. Alkalizing and borax it will discourage the yeast infection from the inside out."
10/26/2011: Gavin from Malacca/ Malaysia replies: "Hi Ted, I have a GSD with major yeast problem. Been in an out of the vet, tried everything and every test. Nothing seems to work. Was reading your site and I am very keen on trying this method. However will first try to get some Borax powder. I am from Malaysia and hope I can get it here. On a separate issue, for their drinking water which as per your instructions to also add borax and baking soda, will it be ok if the other two dogs drink it. They don't have this problem. Please advise. Thank you."

Dog with Yeast Fungus

11/29/2006: Cindy from Hilton Head Island, SC: "I need your help. My dog is suffering from yeast fungus and the vet continues to give her anti fungal pills and antibiotics, I thought too much use of antibiotics caused yeast. I would love to try the ACV, could you tell me how much to use and how often, she weights about 50 lbs. Thanks so much, I am desperate."

Ted from Bangkok, Thailand replies: "Cindy: Yes, people have a huge bout of fungus infection after an antibiotic treatment. There are certain anti-fungal's that will kill the fungus but their record in killing them is not so good as many seems to be relatively resistant.

Most dogs that do get yeast infections often eat prepared dog foods. Prepared dog foods are quite often acid forming for the dog and certain minerals are missing from the dog food such as chromium, zinc, vanadium, tungsten, manganese, for example.

Sugar in dog foods is quite often an unacceptable issue and bring on fungus infection quite easily. A switch, gradual of course to fresh foods, semi cooked meats, and other foods that the dogs are more accustomed to will often resolve this problem, at least it did with me. My dog eats partially cooked chicken and pork, with some partially livers and sometimes raw liver on occasion.

Livers are often rich with minerals and amino acid and can in some cases restore the dogs immunity. Fungus will grow when the body is acid and this is something that you need to deal with. Lemon with baking soda and some sea salt added to the diet can relieve the condition, but so can ACV and baking soda. The best way to approach is a little of everything to get the the body well balanced nutritionally.

Heavy metals is another issue to consider, so adding fresh chinese parsley (cilantro) mixed into his food can remove a lot of heavy metals thus reducing the yeast. Yeast needs heavy metals to survive, antibiotics are not helpful but certain anti-fungal's might, but often not that useful if we don't take the responsibility of taking care of the dog ourselves. It is easy to throw money to the vets, but they are just merely drug dispenser and switching from one antifungal's to another is not the only answer.

It is one of those classic case of Louis Pasteur vs. Beauchamp, where Pasteur favors killing them while Beauchamp favors making an environment unfavorable for yeast growth. Of course all humans and dogs have yeast, it is the issue of what "terrain" is causing them and in my opinion it is the sugar, acid, and minerals. A yeast can grow on ad infinitum even if you DO kill them, because they have always existed before or after the "yeast infection" they are uncontrollable because of the bad diets.

Human food is no different, we get really sick of processed foods too. "

Ted from Bangkok, Thailand replies: "Keri: Additional information. If you think I am getting off easy with no mention of how to cure a dog with a yeast infection (internally) as opposed to externally. The method that seem to work potentially the best is the use of common food preservatives, which are much safer than the use of antibiotics. Also, amazingly enough food preservatives are more effective against yeast and fungus then antibiotics since antibiotics are often effective against only bacteria.

People need to understand that some food preservative are actually naturally found as in cranberry. Cranberry do have benzoates, which is exactly how it was discovered to be used as a food preservatives.

So a mixture of potassium sorbate 250 mg, sodium benzoate 250 mg. is added to a medium large dog to help reduce the yeast infection. Sodium metabisulfites is a possibility (50 mg) but you need not add that.

My rough estimate is given twice a day along with food. Vitamin B complex should be given at separate times to prevent sulfites (if the yeast are stubborn and sulfites are needed) from eating away at the dog's vitamin B1 reserves.

Other possibility is the use of polysorbate 90, and benzoic acid, but those mentioned should help. Side effects from food preservatives are often less severe. There is some potential, especially candida, yeast infection for dogs in the use of food preservative in place of antibiotics. "

08/20/2009: Naomi from Burtonsville, Maryland, Usa replies: "My dog is a begeal/lab mix overweight, he is 4 years old and has previously been diagnoised with a yeast infection from your everyday meats, ex-chick, beef, liver, turkey. he can eat the other meats, vension, rabbit, lamb, bison,etc. Over the past month he has been on a chicken and rice dinner due to upset stomach for a while, after feeding him this mixtue for a month, he seems to have regained the systoms of the yeast infection, licking the paws, ear itch, under the chin itch, spining around on his bottom. These are the systoms that he showed when he was first determined with the allergic reaction. Can you please give me an exact breakdown of your remedies to use for a 102 lb male begeal/lab mix, who steals and eats people food to contain his allergic reaction without going to the vet. I am aware of the change of diet, but need to cure the yeast infection without going to the vet. He also takes benedryl 75 mg 2 x a day, with no releif. Please advise"

Yeast Infection or Mange?

10/14/2006: Keri : "Ted - What a wonderful wealth of knowledge you are! Thank you for your input on my previous ? Yeast Infection vs. mange.. My Golden, as well as I can decipher, has had internal yeast symptoms and we have now been treating him by 1. Universal Medicated shampoos (leaving on 15-30 min.) then rinsing. every third day.2. Giving natural Nyzmes Yeast kit products for cleansing and rebuilding the GI tract. 3. Switching to Eagle Pack food( were feeding Bil Jac) 4. using and E- collar when we are away from home and nightly.. He is still desiring to itch, has some redness of skin, and a few patches that are similar to hotspots although he has no real distinct foul smell.. He is experiencing a blackening of the skin where he had yeast breakouts.. (around his rectal area, under his arm pits and under his rear stomach area.. ) and the spots where the hair is showing regrowth are grey.. His ears are remaining clear up to this point, and we are grateful for this.. Do you see any other ways we can help him.. It has been 4 weeks.."

Ted from Bangkok, Thailand replies: "Dear Keri: Yeast infection of dogs is also often a sign of some kind of mineral deficiency, in particular it is zinc (in form of zinc acetate), molybdenum (in form of sodium molybdate), and manganese (in form of manganese chloride or manganese sulfate). The dose for dogs is simple give say 25 mg of each, and the dose will not go beyond a couple of days, then stop. You should notice reduction in itchiness the next day. If not, then it it might not be working because the the supplements was not properly grounded, not mixed in drinking water, etc. If it does not work after one week, then you may discontinue. However, I find yeast infection is a mineral imbalance. I could not possibly cover all the things, but adding 1/4 teaspoon of borax, in one liter water ONLY one time, will cause the yeast to be starved and dies. The borax prevent sugar from reaching the yeast, thus killing them or at least reduce them too. You use borax both internally and externally. Externally just prepare a saturated borax solution with some hydrogen peroxide 1% to allow penetration thus effectively killing the yeast. However to make this more effective, I prefer to add some 1/2 teaspoon of manganese chloride and 1/4 teaspoon of zinc acetate to the one liter of water. It appears to be rather mild, but it works quite quickly stopping the itch.

An excellent topical solution to area of itchiness I found to be a 5% solution of copper chloride. Vinegar is somewhat less effective and the actions takes a while longer, but copper chloride seems to be fast acting. I have also found in some latest experiments is the manganese chloride, which is safer, although a bit slower to react, but seems to have a longer positive effect on skin condition. However, manganese chloride requires a much higher concentration, such as 30% solution. External treatment can also indirectly correct internal mineral imbalances too. So if you can find zinc, molybdenum and manganese, to treat externally that would be great too. They all have antifungal properties. "

Mange Vs. Yeast Infection

10/08/2006: Keri from Bradenton, FL: "Does anyone know the difference between a yeast infection and mange? I have been detoxing my 11 yr. old golden for nearly 3 weeks, and now am concerned that it may be mange.. Any feedback would help, as I am not completely sold on the orthodox vet care he has been receiving.. antibiotics for everything etc.. Thanks Keri"

Ted from Bangkok, Thailand replies: "Keri: Yeast infection causes the dog to have improper digestion of food, constipation, and other internal problem. Externally yeast and mange look alike, but mange causes skin problems much more severe then a yeast infection, extreme hair loss being the obvious clues. Yeasts are mostly internally, but externally as well. Both yeast and mange causes foul smell.

The best way I can tell a yeast from a mange, is simple. I will treat the dog with a mange first using the 1% hydrogen peroxide with saturated solution of borax first, doing frequently enough. If it doesn't go away then you are facing the issue of the yeast infection. Yeast infection takes advantage of the dog's oily skin as a way to spread it. So if your dog has oily skin, it is likely to be a yeast infection.

Treating a yeast infection if the dog has it on the skin, required some changes in formulation. That means 1% copper chloride + 1% zinc chloride + some vinegar say 20%. Zinc is used to stop the zinc deficiency in dogs, which causes the oily skin, as well as certain yeasts are deadly to them to.

As you can see yeast are somewhat more difficult. Vinegar is used to disrupt the yeast membrane. I am using vinegar in place of hydrogen peroxide as a penetrant, since hydrogen peroxide will react with copper chloride to form copper oxide, thus completely neutralizing the hydrogen peroxide from acting as a penetrant. Therefore, vinegar is the preferred choice if it is indeed a yeast.

It must be noted that if it is yeast, however, you must rinse after the application after a about 10 minutes on the dog. It might be somewhat of an irritant depending on the severity, but the itchiness that the dog experiences should go away in no more than 10 minutes after the application sets in. But if it is mange, you cannot rinse the dog at all. The copper is often quite toxic to certain yeast and fungus. Since fungus have a weakness of copper and zinc, this is added, whenever I needed to get rid of it real quick. Again I am assuming this is external conditions of yeast. Internal yeast infection are a bit more tricky for the dog however. "

Ted from Bangkok, Thailand replies: "Keri: Additional information. If you think I am getting off easy with no mention of how to cure a dog with a yeast infection (internally) as opposed to externally. The method that seem to work potentially the best is the use of common food preservatives, which are much safer than the use of antibiotics. Also, amazingly enough food preservatives are more effective against yeast and fungus then antibiotics since antibiotics are often effective against only bacteria.

People need to understand that some food preservative are actually naturally found as in cranberry. Cranberry do have benzoates, which is exactly how it was discovered to be used as a food preservatives.

So a mixture of potassium sorbate 250 mg, sodium benzoate 250 mg. is added to a medium large dog to help reduce the yeast infection. Sodium metabisulfites is a possibility (50 mg) but you need not add that.

My rough estimate is given twice a day along with food. Vitamin B complex should be given at separate times to prevent sulfites (if the yeast are stubborn and sulfites are needed) from eating away at the dog's vitamin B1 reserves.

Other possibility is the use of polysorbate 90, and benzoic acid, but those mentioned should help. Side effects from food preservatives are often less severe. There is some potential, especially candida, yeast infection for dogs in the use of food preservative in place of antibiotics. "

08/19/2011: Willy from Venice, Ca replies: "Could you please stick with remedies that use ingredients people can actually buy? copper chloride? to find these things and have them shipped would take precious days if not weeks for people to receive. all while our pets are suffering. Sorry but suggesting hard to get chemicals is not helpful at all.

And are you suggesting feeding cranberries for systemic yeast infection? I don't always understand your wording of these remedies. thanks."

08/19/2011: Alicia from Vancouver, Canada replies: "To Willy from Venice: Great point and thank you for making it. I agree 100%. I LOVE this site and have gotten so much useful information but I also tend to find that alot of remedies are unrealistic in terms of costs / availablility."


 

 

DISCLAIMER: Our readers offer information and opinions on Earth Clinic, not as a substitute for professional medical prevention, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult with your physician, pharmacist, or health care provider before taking any home remedies or supplements or following any treatment suggested by anyone on this site. Only your health care provider, personal physician, or pharmacist can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for your unique needs or diagnose your particular medical history.

 

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