Boils, Abscesses, Staph Infections and MRSA

Last Modified on Mar 27, 2008

This page takes a look at the difference between boils, staph infections, MRSA and abscesses.

Return to page 1 (Boils and MRSA cures page)

Boils (or furuncles): is a skin disease caused by the inflammation of hair follicles, resulting in the localized accumulation of pus and dead tissues. Individual boils can cluster together and form an interconnected network of boils.  This cluster is called carbuncles.  In severe cases, boils may develop to form an abscess.

Boils are usually caused by an infection of the hair follicles by Staphylococcus aureus (or staph). Staph is a strain of bacteria that typically resides on the surface of your skin.  The medical community believes that a very small cut in the skin allows the staph to enter the follicles and cause an infection.

Abscess: An abscess is a pool of pus that has accumulated in a cavity formed by tissue by bacteria, parasites, or other materials like splinters or bullets.  It is the body's response to prevent the spread of the infection to other parts of the body. The organisms that gain access to the tissue kill off the local cells releasing toxins and triggering an inflammatory response. Symptoms of an abscess include: heat, redness, swelling, and pain. Abscesses usually occur on the skin's surface (boils) but can also infect the lungs, brain, kidneys and tonsils. Gangrene is the complication that occurs when the abscess material is spread to other tissues.  Prompt medical attention is indicated when an abscess is suspected since the body can rarely heal it on its own.

Staph Infection: The most common cause of staph infections is a bacterium called Staphylococcus aureus which frequently lives on your skin or in your nose. It can cause a range of illnesses like acne, boils and abscesses, to more serious and life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis and Toxic Shock Syndrome.

MRSA Infections: Staph infections which have become resistant to commonly used antibiotic treatments are called methicillin-resistant S. aureus, or MRSA. Since the 1990s, MRSA has become endemic in hospitals. Spread of S. aureus is through human to human contact. Environmental contamination is not considered by the medical community to be an important part of the spread of MRSA!


Check for a Different Diagnosis

Approval Ratings
YEA (1)
100%

[YEA]  04/08/2007: Eileen from Northwest US, US: "I've experienced extremely painful boils/ acne-like, very hard but with no pus starting about 2 yrs ago. I am of average weight and have a healthy diet. I spent many, many months trying to pinpoint the source, doing lots of research. I did finally go to an allopathic nurse pracitioner who said it was impetigo (because they use yes/no answers on a computerized diagnosis program. WRONG! I believe that it's dermatitis herpetiformus, but I didn't want to go through a biopsy to confirm it. It only occurs when gluten is consumed (which is in just about everything packaged). It is exacerbated by hormonal cycles and low thyroid. I think that perimenopause has thrown off my hormone balance and has led to gluten intolerance. Here's what helps: stop consuming all grains and follow a diet for candida/yeast. This takes a long time, and it was really hard to do, but it is the only real solution I've found. (After finally healing and staying off flour for a year and a half, I had one slice of pizza, and it's deja-vu all over again). Topically, use niacinamide gel (Metazine from Life Link) very frequently (really helps reduce inflammation), salicylic acid gel, and yes, I use cortisone too. I think the niacinamide works best. Vit E is ok if not sourced from wheat. Taking massive supplements hasn't helped (like high doses of A, D, E, selenium, zinc, even up to 400mg CoQ10 -no response. I do use curcumin, wobenzym, niacinimide, colloidal silver. Thyroid supplementation has been a significant help. I have used real low doses of doxycycline for a very limited time and it did seem to help a bit but I stopped due to a reaction beginning. I used activated charcoal and it's possible that considering the link between wheat sensitivity, leaky gut or IgA deficiency, and the breakout a few days later, that it's the charcoal's work not the doxycycline that really helped at that time. Of course, maybe it's really from chemtrail fallout. Who knows? Whatever it is, it is HELL and the Metazine works wonders. Good luck."


Hidradenitis Suppurativa

Approval Ratings
YEA (1)
100%

[YEA]  01/18/2007: Jan from Perth, Australia: "Several people have mentioned cures that did not work for their boils - particularly those people who had a number of boils in their armpit, breast or groin area. They may want to check to see if they have Hidradenitis Suppurativa which presents like boils in those areas but is not curable. There is a lot of information about HS on the web and it seems to be often misdiagnosed so it may be worth seeing a dermatologist for a second opinion."

EC: Hidradenitis is a chronic disease of the apocrine glands (sweat gland found on certain parts of the body). These glands become plugged or clogged. The condition causes chronic scarring and pus formation of the underarms, groin and/or inner thigh areas. In women it can also occur under the breasts. Hidradenitis begins with a red, tender, swelling in the groin or armpit. Over time the lesions enlarge and burst open at the surface, draining clear to yellow fluid.


Kelfex

Approval Ratings
YEA (1)
100%

[YEA]  09/04/2007: Susan from Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S.A.: "M.R.S.A. Boils -- Health care worker who contracted M.R.S.A. Had developed a boil the size of my shoulder with the open area larger than a nickel and deep. Excruciatingly painful to lift my arm and had a large lymph node developing in my arm pit. Determined not to be scarred by this nasty boil, it was drained, then I used Arnica on (not in) the surrounding tissue (three times a day) then neosporin within the open wound. Kept it covered and continued treating it and keeping it clean.

M.D. prescribed Kelfex...which was a waste of time and money. The boil healed beautifully, no crater or pain left. However, I was growing weaker/ sicker and fairly sure I would end up in the hospital or dead. Both not on my list of "fun". Currently on Doxycyline. Do I think it's working? Reserving judgement at this time. Will be trying tumeric and Hibiclense."








 



 

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